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Guest bayhound

Hi there! Guess I should do a little bit of an introduction first before asking my quirky questions. I was first introduced to greyhounds through my local rescue's events hosted at Petsmart and other outdoor venues, and later came to know several personally through my work (a pet lodge/daycare). Ever since, I've fallen in love with the breed! After a few years of waiting, research, and now having an accommodating work schedule, it's finally time to adopt one of my own. Hopefully in a few weeks I'll have an in-home visit and a meet-and-greet with a few greys that are compatible for me :) It's also exciting to see such an active forum related to greyhounds! Super surprised to see that.

As much research as I've done, I feel like there's a few things that I just need to ask regarding greyhounds in particular. I'm going to underline a few things because I'll probably write several paragraphs, and I feel like nobody wants to read through all of that! What does everyone think of raised feeders? I've seen a lot of contradicting stuff, but it seems like putting a food bowl on an overturned bucket or a plant stand is high enough to be beneficial but not too high to cause bloat or anything. Does anyone have experience with slow feeders and greyhounds? Are they super opposed to them? I figure it's a case-by-case basis, but I really want to make sure my grey doesn't hoover down food. I've seen too many accidents happen from it. I'll be getting a few silicone slow feeders because I'm worried the hard plastic/steel of normal ones will deter a sensitive pointy snoot.

 

During the summer, is it not recommended to use a cooling jacket/vest for greys? I know they can't control/regulate extreme temperatures well, so I'm wondering if having a cooling vest on would do them more harm than good. I already have a cooling mat, but the vests are a lot nicer to use when mobile/walking/outside.

 

For grooming, all of the greyhounds I have seen and known have had uber long nails. I think it's just because where they're so thick, it can be a job to get them down to a shorter length, but is there actually any benefit from greys keeping long nails? I know they're a different breed in a lot of respects, so I wasn't sure if it was wiser to keep them long so they could have more traction or something similar. Personally I like nails pretty short - I want to avoid any health/mobility issues that may be caused by long nails! With brushes, I have a Zoom Groom, but is there anything else anyone suggests for their coats that doesn't damage their skin? I'm not a fan of the way the rubber on my Zoom pulls short-furred dogs' skin/hair.

 

For crating, I'm not opposed to a crate at all, but I'd love it if my grey slept in the bed with me/I don't mind them sleeping on couches. However, I'd still like for them to have a safe place or have some sort of area to be slightly confined in when I'm not home. I was thinking of getting a kuranda/raised bed and setting up an x-pen around it with a blanket over top. That way, I can take the x-pen down and they'd still have a bed out, but it won't be as bulky as a crate being up all the time. Would that be suitable? I also don't think my local rescue provides greyhound muzzles - anyone know a good place to get one? Any kind in particular I should get?

 

Right now, I think that's all I got! I'm so sorry for the novel post, but I like to be prepared for most things before the last minute. Thank you so much!

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Raised feeder/slow feeder – Always used raised feeders. They look so uncomfortable when eating from the floor! I have a 12 inches high for my 27 inches male, but used to have a 17 inches high for my 31 inches male. I have never used slow feeder, but we have always added water to the kibble. Over time, they tend to slow down their eating. Mind you it still takes less than 3 minutes to finish up their meals!

 

Cooling jackets – Never used but was thinking of getting one actually. Usually when out and about, I find water and splash them when they get too warm. And we rest up in the shade. Weather has never really been an issue, but then again, I live in Canada hahaha

 

Nails/brushes – Keep the nails as short as you can! They don’t need extra long nails for traction, you increase the risk of a dislocated/broken toe. My boy have relatively short nails. As for brushes, anything rubbery is fine. Zoom groom is perfect, or that hand rubbery glove too.

 

Crating – I don’t think a grey would be comfortable on a kuranda bed all day. Instead, a nice bed and x-pen would be ok I guess, but I would be afraid of him/her jumping out and injuring him/herself. I would advise with a crate and who knows, you might not even need it after a few weeks/months. I crated mine 3 months and that was it. The crate is now up in the study and once in a while he goes in for funsies, but that is that. On the other hand, I am currently dogsitting two dogs that are crated all day and LOVE/NEED their crates. So you never know what kind of hound you will get. Most of them are ok without a crate after a while though. You will get different opinions on this J

Raised feeder/slow feeder – Always used raised feeders. They look so uncomfortable when eating from the floor! I have a 12 inches high for my 27 inches male, but used to have a 17 inches high for my 31 inches male. I have never used slow feeder, but we have always added water to the kibble. Over time, they tend to slow down their eating. Mind you it still takes less than 3 minutes to finish up their meals!

 

Cooling jackets – Never used but was thinking of getting one actually. Usually when out and about, I find water and splash them when they get too warm. And we rest up in the shade. Weather has never really been an issue, but then again, I live in Canada hahaha

 

Nails/brushes – Keep the nails as short as you can! They don’t need extra long nails for traction, you increase the risk of a dislocated/broken toe. My boy have relatively short nails. As for brushes, anything rubbery is fine. Zoom groom is perfect, or that hand rubbery glove too.

 

Crating – I don’t think a grey would be comfortable on a kuranda bed all day. Instead, a nice bed and x-pen would be ok I guess, but I would be afraid of him/her jumping out and injuring him/herself. I would advise with a crate and who knows, you might not even need it after a few weeks/months. I crated mine 3 months and that was it. The crate is now up in the study and once in a while he goes in for funsies, but that is that. On the other hand, I am currently dogsitting two dogs that are crated all day and LOVE/NEED their crates. So you never know what kind of hound you will get. Most of them are ok without a crate after a while though. You will get different opinions on this

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Cynthia, with Charlie (Britishlionheart) & Zorro el Galgo
Captain Jack (Check my Spots), my first love

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You've gotten good info above. I'd only quibble with the raised feeders being an absolute necessity. Sweep actually seems to gag more when her bowls are off the floor. But maybe she's a weirdo. :lol She eats on a non-slip rug and we've had no issues with her going all giraffe-legged that way. We also add warm water to the kibble.

 

We're in hot, humid TN and have never used a cooling vest. We just keep walks very short (10 minutes) in the heat of the day and try to do trips to air-conditioned, pet-friendly stores to keep her from going stir-crazy during the summer.

 

A good source for muzzles is the GEM Greyhounds store. This is the exact kind that most adoption groups give out.

 

Best of luck with your home visit. Please keep us posted!

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Rachel with Sweep and kitties Olive and Momo.
Always missing my boys Mud and
Henry

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Guest bayhound

Raised feeder/slow feeder – Always used raised feeders. They look so uncomfortable when eating from the floor! I have a 12 inches high for my 27 inches male, but used to have a 17 inches high for my 31 inches male. I have never used slow feeder, but we have always added water to the kibble. Over time, they tend to slow down their eating. Mind you it still takes less than 3 minutes to finish up their meals!

 

Cooling jackets – Never used but was thinking of getting one actually. Usually when out and about, I find water and splash them when they get too warm. And we rest up in the shade. Weather has never really been an issue, but then again, I live in Canada hahaha

 

Nails/brushes – Keep the nails as short as you can! They don’t need extra long nails for traction, you increase the risk of a dislocated/broken toe. My boy have relatively short nails. As for brushes, anything rubbery is fine. Zoom groom is perfect, or that hand rubbery glove too.

 

Crating – I don’t think a grey would be comfortable on a kuranda bed all day. Instead, a nice bed and x-pen would be ok I guess, but I would be afraid of him/her jumping out and injuring him/herself. I would advise with a crate and who knows, you might not even need it after a few weeks/months. I crated mine 3 months and that was it. The crate is now up in the study and once in a while he goes in for funsies, but that is that. On the other hand, I am currently dogsitting two dogs that are crated all day and LOVE/NEED their crates. So you never know what kind of hound you will get. Most of them are ok without a crate after a while though. You will get different opinions on this J

 

Thanks! I was thinking about a 12" as well, but I'll adjust that as needed depending on the size of the greyhound I'll adopt. I plan on adding water too - along with a lot of other supplements. We'll go slowly, of course, but this is going to be a very spoiled dog, haha. I just hope they're not too picky!

 

Oh gosh, yeah, I imagine the weather is a little different there! As for the x-pen, I was hoping the height combined with a blanket over top would deter them from jumping, but I think I'll just have to see what the dog likes. Eventually I'd just like for it to be able to free-roam my bedroom baby-gated off while wearing a muzzle, but we shall see. It was an idea I had. Thanks for the advice!

 

You've gotten good info above. I'd only quibble with the raised feeders being an absolute necessity. Sweep actually seems to gag more when her bowls are off the floor. But maybe she's a weirdo. :lol She eats on a non-slip rug and we've had no issues with her going all giraffe-legged that way. We also add warm water to the kibble.

 

We're in hot, humid TN and have never used a cooling vest. We just keep walks very short (10 minutes) in the heat of the day and try to do trips to air-conditioned, pet-friendly stores to keep her from going stir-crazy during the summer.

 

A good source for muzzles is the GEM Greyhounds store. This is the exact kind that most adoption groups give out.

 

Best of luck with your home visit. Please keep us posted!

 

As mentioned by the other user, I just feel like it's so awkward for them to bend down so low - almost like a giraffe, haha. Oh, interesting! I really hope mine doesn't mind a raised bowl. Only the food would be raised, though, since the water bowl I have is a water fountain and my cat needs to drink out of it too.

 

I was worried mostly for when we'd be outside for long periods of time at the park, hiking, etc. I can't guarantee that we'll always have access to shade or a pool of water, so I think a vest would be nice :) Thanks for the muzzle website! I'll definitely make updates!

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Greyhounds are very used to being crated in their respective racing kennels, but being crated with a room full of friends and being crated all by yourself are two entirely different things. Some greyhounds like and use their crates every day/night, some just have them available, and some decide that they are done with crates all together and start being destructive or escape from the crate. But you won't know what kind you have until you bring them home.

 

We've had eight greyhounds and the only one we ever crated was the 4 month old puppy. Even then, she was soon out of the crate and loose in the house when we left. You can also muzzle and confine, as suggested. Alone Training right from the beginning is *very* important in getting your new greyhound OK with being left alone.

 

I also want to add that there are good reasons to have a dog be comfortable in a crate - emergencies, evacuations, vet treatment, vacations and visiting. So *some* crate training and familiarity are important no matter what you ultimately decide to do in your home.

 

In the kennels greyhounds are fed in their crates with the bowls on the floor and everything seems to work fine. That being said, they do seem to appreciate their food being easily available. Most also eat a lot faster than other breeds, so a slow feeder bowl may not be necessary. They also do slow down as they settle into retired life. Enough water on dry kibble seems to be the key.

 

Cooling beds and jackets do help, though mostly you'll want to avoid strenuous activity in the heat of the day, especially in summer. Again, lots of greyhounds do just fine in warmer weather, but there are those that do not tolerate anything above 78 well at all. Access to cool fresh water all the time is important for any dog, as you know.

 

I wouldn't go overboard with additives and supplements for your dog right away. Give their system time to settle down from all the changes, and to make sure they are cleared of all parasites. Get a good quality food, hopefully the same as they've been feeding at the adoption kennel/foster, and just see how it goes for several weeks before changing anything.

 

Most important is to relax and enjoy the first few weeks! Good luck and keep us in the loop!

Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

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Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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Guest bayhound

Greyhounds are very used to being crated in their respective racing kennels, but being crated with a room full of friends and being crated all by yourself are two entirely different things. Some greyhounds like and use their crates every day/night, some just have them available, and some decide that they are done with crates all together and start being destructive or escape from the crate. But you won't know what kind you have until you bring them home.

 

We've had eight greyhounds and the only one we ever crated was the 4 month old puppy. Even then, she was soon out of the crate and loose in the house when we left. You can also muzzle and confine, as suggested. Alone Training right from the beginning is *very* important in getting your new greyhound OK with being left alone.

 

I also want to add that there are good reasons to have a dog be comfortable in a crate - emergencies, evacuations, vet treatment, vacations and visiting. So *some* crate training and familiarity are important no matter what you ultimately decide to do in your home.

 

In the kennels greyhounds are fed in their crates with the bowls on the floor and everything seems to work fine. That being said, they do seem to appreciate their food being easily available. Most also eat a lot faster than other breeds, so a slow feeder bowl may not be necessary. They also do slow down as they settle into retired life. Enough water on dry kibble seems to be the key.

 

Cooling beds and jackets do help, though mostly you'll want to avoid strenuous activity in the heat of the day, especially in summer. Again, lots of greyhounds do just fine in warmer weather, but there are those that do not tolerate anything above 78 well at all. Access to cool fresh water all the time is important for any dog, as you know.

 

I wouldn't go overboard with additives and supplements for your dog right away. Give their system time to settle down from all the changes, and to make sure they are cleared of all parasites. Get a good quality food, hopefully the same as they've been feeding at the adoption kennel/foster, and just see how it goes for several weeks before changing anything.

 

Most important is to relax and enjoy the first few weeks! Good luck and keep us in the loop!

 

Like you said, I think I'm running into the problem of not knowing what kind I'll have until they're home. It makes planning ahead a little difficult. I don't mind a crate at all - I love the den/safe place aspect of it - it's just the space in my room is slightly limited for a crate big enough for a grey and I was hoping to try and find another alternative to simulate a safe place. If I can't, really, then a crate it is, haha. I'm excited to start the Alone Training too (I read the New Owner Guidebook link here a few days ago and found it very helpful). So nice to get those things established early :)

 

I didn't realize that adding water to kibble helped slow eating down so much. Maybe I won't need a slow feeder, then! I'll probably have to experiment. It'd definitely make cleaning easier if I didn't have to worry about a bunch of grooves and divets. I'm pretty paranoid about tummy upsets (probably a reason I've been so particular about raised bowls/feed mats/etc), so we'll be taking the new food and supplement transition slowly. I'm hoping to feed Acana/Orijen with some raw things here and there, but I'll definitely be getting a bag of the dog's original food and doing a several week transition.

 

As excited as I am for a grey, I'll also be taking in those nice, slow moments as well while we're getting a feel for each other - don't worry :) Thank you so much for all the advice! I'll be updating!

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Most of the people I know feed Taste of the wild. I think I've heard Acana/Orijen can be too rich. I can't recall who told me that though. I feed raw only.

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Kari and the pups.
Run free sweet Hana 9/21/08-9/12/10. Missing Sparks with every breath.
Passion 10/16/02-5/25/17

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Most of the people I know feed Taste of the wild. I think I've heard Acana/Orijen can be too rich. I can't recall who told me that though. I feed raw only.

Acana and Orijen graded food is too rich for mine too, I feed Fromm :) Really, I know people always want a high grade food, but as long as the dog is good on the food, nice output, nice fur, no farts, no itchiness, then that is the best food for them :)

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Cynthia, with Charlie (Britishlionheart) & Zorro el Galgo
Captain Jack (Check my Spots), my first love

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Most of the people I know feed Taste of the wild. I think I've heard Acana/Orijen can be too rich. I can't recall who told me that though. I feed raw only.

 

Acana and Orijen graded food is too rich for mine too, I feed Fromm :) Really, I know people always want a high grade food, but as long as the dog is good on the food, nice output, nice fur, no farts, no itchiness, then that is the best food for them :)

 

We feed Fromm too. :)

 

I'm also worried about them being too rich, especially from what I've read about sensitive tummies greys tend to have... :( But I really trust Champion pet food, so I'm going to try first and see where it goes. Acana's proteins aren't as high as Orijen's, so I'll be starting with a less "exotic" flavor from them first. If there's a lot of diarrhea, really frequent, or loose stools after several weeks... I'll be switching. I'll be upset to, but every dog is different. I like Fromm too, and would look into Zignature or Canidae as well depending on ingredients/ratios/their parent company. I used to really like TotW, but after Diamond took over, I'm leary. I'm keeping my fingers crossed it won't be too bad, but we shall see! I would love to do a completely raw diet, but unfortunately I haven't done quite enough research on it, don't know where the best places would be for me to get my stock locally, and in the long run it might be too expensive. I do plan on supplementing with it though - especially green tripe and meat/bone/organ mixes!

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You can search here in the Food section - lots of debates over the "best" kind of food to feed. Most greys seem to do best on a food with between 20-25% protein. Anything much higher and you begin to get digestive issues (farting, diarrhea, etc). Unless you'll be doing a lot of physical activity, then it will probably be fine. Lots of people feed the Coscto foods, and the Iams "green bag" version with very good success, even though those aren't necessarily high end kibbles.

 

Raw can also be a good choice. There are a number of pre-prepared raw food diets available now, though they can be prohibitively expensive. If you have local source of a raw mix, and ample freezer room, it can be a great way to feed your dog.

Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

35764734494_93de5b5963_b.jpg

Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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Hi there! I know a lot of people have weighed in, but I thought the more the merrier! First off, congrats on the beginning of your journey with a Greyhound. I just adopted my first in April. (He's, of course, the Best Dog In The World)

 

Raised feeders) Yes, people either are all for them or all against them. For me, it's more of getting the dog to eat slowly. Not all animals like soupy food, so you may have to play with exactly how much water to add. My dog, Rogue, likes to lap up the soupiness before getting to the kibble. I figure he's eaten from the ground his entire life, so I haven't made a raised feeder. I do feed him on a rug so he does not slide on the wood floor. I just ordered a slow feeder bowl online since Rogue will occasionally gulp too fast for my liking.

 

Cooling vest) I'm actually thinking of getting one, so I'm reading people's replies! We had a 2 day streak of hot weather and while waiting for the A/C repair person, Rogue did enjoy laying his head on an ice pack I wrapped in a towel.

 

Grooming) I use a rubber mitt or a soft curry comb meant for horses. Works like a charm.

 

Crating) Rogue was not fostered before coming to me so I used a crate for about 2 weeks to house train him and haven't used it since. He also hasn't figured out how to get up on the couch or bed...yet. Hehe.

 

Supplements) I'm using Olewo carrots and Rogue loves them.

 

Food) I have tried two flavors of Zignature and while Rogue eats it up, he is super gassy and the Olewo carrots are the only thing keeping his poop firm. So I'll be trying something a tier down next.

Sarah with P Kay Ruger "Rogue"

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Big Acana fans here, although our girls do well also on Costco's equivalent of Taste of the Wild. Both of our girls love their crates and can be found in them frequently by choice, although we did have one for a while that absolutely HATED his crate.

 

We do raised feeders just because it looks more comfy.

 

Our girls are both black and we've never used cooling coats, just damp clothes if really needed.

 

Welcome!

Dave (GLS DeviousDavid) - 6/27/18
Gracie (AMF Saying Grace) - 10/21/12
Bella (KT Britta) - 4/29/05 to 2/13/20

 

 

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I used a cooling coat for Treasure only, because she really felt the heat. Have never used one with other dogs.

 

I don't believe in crating, and would only do so ir the dog's safety was at risk being loose.

 

I use a slow feeder with Xavi, as he eats so quickly that he would also eat Iker's food without it.

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Xavi the galgo and Allen the cat. Missing Iker the galgo ?-Feb.9/19, Treasure (USS Treasure) April 12/01-May 6/13, Phoenix (Hallo Top Son) Dec.14/99-June 4/11 and Loca (Reko Swahili) Oct.9/95 - June 1/09.

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Welcome-in-advance from a fellow SW Virginian. Where are you getting your hound from? I get mine from Greyhound Friends in Oak Ridge NC, since that is near where I used to live. GFNC has a shop at www.greyhoundfriends.com where you can get basket muzzles.

 

Crate -- I keep a fold-down crate for the short period after the hound first arrives until I feel the dog can be trusted in a larger area of the house, or needs to be kept quiet due to injury. All the hounds here have preferred house to crate. I use closed doors and babygates to restrict areas. Milo will open sliding wooden doors, but respect a babygate in the same doorway :dunno

 

Slow feeders -- Another vote for adding a cup+ of water to kibble, but you can add large rocks or tennis balls to a bowl instead of buying something more expensive. And you'll want to save your money for more important things, like treats and collars and coats. :)

Edited by EllenEveBaz

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Ellen, Milo, and Jeter

remembering Eve, Baz, Scout, Romie, and Nutmeg

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Cat? Did anyone notice that there is a cat, too?: "since the water bowl I have is a water fountain and my cat needs to drink out of it too."

How about giving some advice on new greys and cats.

Just thought I'd throw that in the mix as mine is a real cat hater.

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I noticed that she has a cat and automatically assumed the group from which she'll adopt will have this info and match accordingly.

 

My girl Annie has zero prey drive. Nada. Nothing. She ignored my cat (who has since passed away). She ignores the rabbits in the backyard and once walked right up to a rabbit in the backyard, that was frozen with fear, sniffed it and then walked away to pee. She ignores little yappy dogs. She is more gentle than usual around little children.

 

IMO, a cat doesn't have to be an issue if the right dog is adopted.

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Sorry for not getting back to everyone sooner! I'm going to break up my replies into a couple posts so it won't be so long.

 

You can search here in the Food section - lots of debates over the "best" kind of food to feed. Most greys seem to do best on a food with between 20-25% protein. Anything much higher and you begin to get digestive issues (farting, diarrhea, etc). Unless you'll be doing a lot of physical activity, then it will probably be fine. Lots of people feed the Coscto foods, and the Iams "green bag" version with very good success, even though those aren't necessarily high end kibbles.

 

Raw can also be a good choice. There are a number of pre-prepared raw food diets available now, though they can be prohibitively expensive. If you have local source of a raw mix, and ample freezer room, it can be a great way to feed your dog.

 

I wish I could feed raw all the time, but alas, it's a bit too expensive for me right now :( I'll definitely be supplementing with some raw here and there, though. For the kibble, I'll be watching out for those signs of an upset stomach/digestive issues and I'll downgrade if needed. I'm hoping to be somewhat active with my grey (occasional big hikes, frequent trails, some other out and abouts), so maybe that'll help too. I didn't realize Costco sold dog food... interesting. We don't have a local one here, but we do have Sam's Club if that's similar at all.

 

Hi there! I know a lot of people have weighed in, but I thought the more the merrier! First off, congrats on the beginning of your journey with a Greyhound. I just adopted my first in April. (He's, of course, the Best Dog In The World)

 

Raised feeders) Yes, people either are all for them or all against them. For me, it's more of getting the dog to eat slowly. Not all animals like soupy food, so you may have to play with exactly how much water to add. My dog, Rogue, likes to lap up the soupiness before getting to the kibble. I figure he's eaten from the ground his entire life, so I haven't made a raised feeder. I do feed him on a rug so he does not slide on the wood floor. I just ordered a slow feeder bowl online since Rogue will occasionally gulp too fast for my liking.

 

Cooling vest) I'm actually thinking of getting one, so I'm reading people's replies! We had a 2 day streak of hot weather and while waiting for the A/C repair person, Rogue did enjoy laying his head on an ice pack I wrapped in a towel.

 

Grooming) I use a rubber mitt or a soft curry comb meant for horses. Works like a charm.

 

Crating) Rogue was not fostered before coming to me so I used a crate for about 2 weeks to house train him and haven't used it since. He also hasn't figured out how to get up on the couch or bed...yet. Hehe.

 

Supplements) I'm using Olewo carrots and Rogue loves them.

 

Food) I have tried two flavors of Zignature and while Rogue eats it up, he is super gassy and the Olewo carrots are the only thing keeping his poop firm. So I'll be trying something a tier down next.

 

Yes, the more the merrier! Thank you, and congrats to you on your first! It's so exciting. Glad to hear he settled in nicely c:

Yeah, I was mostly interested in the slow feeder/raised platform to prevent gulping and swallowing so much down at once. Better to be safe than sorry! It'll be fun to test the waters and see what consistency my grey likes or prefers, if they have any preference at all. I'm mostly hoping that they won't be terribly picky, but only time will tell.

 

When looking for cooling vests, aside from wondering if it would be too much of a shock for a grey's body paired against the heat, I was curious how fitting one would go. With their deep chests, I just assumed it would automatically be a problem, so that's also why I was hoping for some replies, haha. I've thought about a curry comb - I'll have to look into that. I've never heard of Olewo carrots before until I came here - been seeing it pop into a lot of different threads. I'll be looking into those!

 

Big Acana fans here, although our girls do well also on Costco's equivalent of Taste of the Wild. Both of our girls love their crates and can be found in them frequently by choice, although we did have one for a while that absolutely HATED his crate.

We do raised feeders just because it looks more comfy.

Our girls are both black and we've never used cooling coats, just damp clothes if really needed.

Welcome!

 

Thanks! Out of curiosity, what flavor of Acana do you currently feed? I've been leaning towards Heritage Meats (red bag w/beef and pork, 60/40 ratio), but I'm worried that might be too rich, especially since there's a little lamb in there too. If it is, I've also been looking at the Duck & Pear recipe, since it's 50/50 and duck seems to be a less rich protein.

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I used a cooling coat for Treasure only, because she really felt the heat. Have never used one with other dogs.

 

I don't believe in crating, and would only do so ir the dog's safety was at risk being loose.

 

I use a slow feeder with Xavi, as he eats so quickly that he would also eat Iker's food without it.

 

Do you remember the brand of cooling vest/coat you had for Treasure and if you'd recommend it again? If not, that's okay :) I've only recently started my search.

 

Welcome-in-advance from a fellow SW Virginian. Where are you getting your hound from? I get mine from Greyhound Friends in Oak Ridge NC, since that is near where I used to live. GFNC has a shop at www.greyhoundfriends.com where you can get basket muzzles.

 

Crate -- I keep a fold-down crate for the short period after the hound first arrives until I feel the dog can be trusted in a larger area of the house, or needs to be kept quiet due to injury. All the hounds here have preferred house to crate. I use closed doors and babygates to restrict areas. Milo will open sliding wooden doors, but respect a babygate in the same doorway :dunno

 

Slow feeders -- Another vote for adding a cup+ of water to kibble, but you can add large rocks or tennis balls to a bowl instead of buying something more expensive. And you'll want to save your money for more important things, like treats and collars and coats. :)

 

Thank you! I'm working with Star City Greyhounds right now. :) Awesome - I'll be sure to take a look at those muzzles. Wow, I'm impressed one could open a sliding door of any kind! That's determination. I'll be using baby gates too, and I'm hoping they get the picture and are able to understand restricted space fairly quickly.

 

I'm a little frugal, so I'm definitely all about saving money! My wallet is already crying over the thought of the martingales, harness, jammies, and leads I want. :D

 

Cat? Did anyone notice that there is a cat, too?: "since the water bowl I have is a water fountain and my cat needs to drink out of it too."

How about giving some advice on new greys and cats.

Just thought I'd throw that in the mix as mine is a real cat hater.

 

I noticed that she has a cat and automatically assumed the group from which she'll adopt will have this info and match accordingly.

 

My girl Annie has zero prey drive. Nada. Nothing. She ignored my cat (who has since passed away). She ignores the rabbits in the backyard and once walked right up to a rabbit in the backyard, that was frozen with fear, sniffed it and then walked away to pee. She ignores little yappy dogs. She is more gentle than usual around little children.

 

IMO, a cat doesn't have to be an issue if the right dog is adopted.

 

I'll do both of these in one go. I'd be open for advice regarding cats and new greys, sure! The program does know I have a cat and I'll only be meeting with dogs that are cat-friendly. My cat, Gypsy, has lived with other dogs before and knows how to let them know she needs space. She's curious of them, but she also has plenty of places to escape to and feel safe (including two cat towers and a few hidey spaces just for her). It'll most likely take a few weeks for her to adjust to another dog again, but I'll let her go at her own pace. This is one reason I was interested in getting a basket muzzle for those first few weeks just in case and for when I'm away as an extra precaution.

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We've fed Iams green bag, Tractor Supplies 4 Health lamb, and now feed Purina One lamb and rice. Anything more high end gives my crew very loose ends. ;)

 

I thought most adoption groups gave adopters a muzzle? I know that GFNC does.

 

Cooling coats - they eventually evaporate and may cause the dog to be too warm. I'd rather tote an extra bottle of water on walks.

 

Charlie the iggy, Hada the podenco maneta, Georgie Girl (UMR Cordella), Lulu the podenco andaluz
Angels: Mazy (CBR Crazy Girl), Potato, my mystery ibizan girl, Allen (M's Pretty Boy), Percy (Fast But True), Mikey (Doray's Patuti), Pudge le mutt, Tessa the iggy, Possum (Apostle), Gracie (Dusty Lady), Harold (Slatex Harold), "Cousin" Simon our step-iggy, Little Dude the iggy ,Bandit (Bb Blue Jay), Niña the galgo, Wally (Allen Hogg), Thane (Pog Mo Thoine), Oliver (JJ Special Agent), Comet, & Rosie our original mutt.

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There is nothing special about greyhound feet or nails. Cut them like you would any other. I think the long nails you may have seen belong to dogs whose owners cannot cut them for whatever reason, and think that a once a month (or less?) trip to have someone cut them is enough (it's not).

 

Cooling coats are not necessary. Don't go on long walks in high heat or humidity. Problem solved.

 

I could care less how fast my dog eats. I've never known a dog who didn't gobble down his food. Assuming the dog isn't vomiting it all right back up, it's not a problem. It's a DOG. They eat like...dogs!

 

Both of my hounds hated crates. I still own one, but I hope to never use it again.

 

I have cats. Neither of my hounds gave them more than a cursory glance. There are far more hounds that do just fine with indoor cats than don't, although the owners of "cat zappers" seem oddly proud to announce their dogs would kill a cat if they could. Mine sleeps on the couch with MY cat, but would happily catch and maul one outdoors.

 

Every greyhound is different, and the dog you adopt won't be the dog you end up with--they change, some of them a lot, as you have them for a while.

 

Best advice: work with a good group, and let them guide you to the right dog for your situation. Don't fall in love with a picture, a specific color or gender--the right dog is out there, let the experts pick it!


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Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest bayhound

It's been a little while, but I wanted to let everyone know I finally had my meet and greet with the group! I met three lovely boys and while we think two would be a nice fit, the supervisor seems to think that I was "chosen" by one in particular. :) Now I just wait to hear back regarding a home check/delivery date and go from there! I'm going to have to force myself to be patient and wait the rest out accordingly from here, haha.

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It's been a little while, but I wanted to let everyone know I finally had my meet and greet with the group! I met three lovely boys and while we think two would be a nice fit, the supervisor seems to think that I was "chosen" by one in particular. :) Now I just wait to hear back regarding a home check/delivery date and go from there! I'm going to have to force myself to be patient and wait the rest out accordingly from here, haha.

 

I wish you the best of luck :D I'm currently researching myself, but for a service dog. The more I talk to owners, the more it looks like a retired racer is my answer!

 

Do post pix of your baby when you get a chance :)

Beware of dog? Forget the dog - BEWARE OF CAT! No wait. The budgie is a killer, too.

 

35618219502_5f27c04249_s.jpgAaerro by Vampiric Conure, on Flickr

 

Rainbow Bridge - Aaerro march 2018

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  • 3 weeks later...
Guest bayhound

Well, the day is finally here... He's home! :) Perhaps not the best weekend for a new pup with this being the time for fireworks, but since I have 4 days off from work, it's a good time to allow him to get adjusted to thing.

 

Right off the bat, he remembered me (or he was just looking for a sucker to take off his muzzle :P), and upon entering the house he got to experience the queen of the house. He was a little too interested in Gypsy, my cat, at first, but after she cussed him a bit and made some noises he wasn't find of, he decided she was best left be. We'll still use muzzled and leashed interactions for a while, but I think they have the potential to have an understanding in the future.

 

After checking out the house and going for a long walk around the neighborhood, he's finally settled down for a nap. As much as I'd rather be typing this from a computer and not my phone, I don't dare move in fear of waking him! I'll share pictures as soon as I'm able. As the lovely lady with the program put it, he likes to have his hand held in new situations and is chill to go with the flow and do whatever his person does, and I've definitely already seen that. He has some adorable quirks, like getting the end of his tongue caught outside his mouth when he pauses during a curious inspection, and tucking his head under my arm for attention... I hope to get the tongue especially in a picture soon. :D

 

We're going to practice some alone crate training after he wakes up and gets another short walk. His racing name was Zeus Rising, and he'll be 4 in December. Right now his call name is Zeus, but I'm fairly sure I'll be changing that to Arlo. One step at a time!

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