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My Grey Picked Up A Little White Dog Like A Chew Toy


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Is this something to worry about? My husband was walking my dog around a public lake, properly walking on a lead as always. A man with two small white dogs was approaching on a lead that allows the dog to extend and pull the leash longer. One of the white dogs was especially eager to get toward my dog and was growling. My husband asked the man twice to please control his dogs and the man said it would be okay. Well it was not okay with my grey. The white dog came charging at him wanting to nip his legs and in no time at all the white dog was in my dog's mouth and being thrashed like a stuffed animal. It was all over in seconds. The white dog was not seriously hurt from what my husband could tell and the other owner did not seem overly concerned. He did not look like he was bleeding but he was yapping while he was being tossed around by my dog.

 

My greyhound has never been aggressive to another dog. Is this something I should worry about in the future when out for walks. He has several little white dogs in the neighborhood who do not "charge" him and they are "friends" but now I am a little worried.

 

Any advice? Many thanks.

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He was properly responding to overt aggression from the stupid little dog (and his stupid owner). People who use flexi leashes get what they deserve. I have very little sympathy for those type of owners.

 

But likely your dog will be fine in the future. This dog was rude and shouldn't have been allowed to approach yours like that.

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Picking a dog up in its mouth and thrashing it around is NOT a proper response to an aggressive dog. I don't for the life of me understand why people keep saying this when these prey drive types of situations come up.

 

Obviously the other owner shouldn't have let their growling dog approach, but yes, you should be cautious moving forward. Its possible the dog did have internal injuries. Even if it didn't, the next time you might not be so lucky. And sadly even if your dog is on leash, you could have a serious issue on your hands if he does seriously inquire or kill a small dog.

 

Not in any way placing blame on you for this incident, I'm sure it was scary on both ends, but now you are aware the potential is there for him to do this so you have a responsibility to exercise caution so no one gets hurt.

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I agree with NeylasMom - that was a prey response, not how a dog typically responds to a rude or aggressive dog. Now you know your pup is NOT small-dog safe in every circumstance.

 

Yes the other dog was out of the owners control which is their fault, but that would be cold comfort if your dog kills another dog or cat.

 

Personally I try not to let my dogs meet other dogs on walks. I will turn the other way, cross the street, or put them on a very short lead. They have never grabbed or bitten another dog but they did grab and shake a friendly cat once in the exact same way. They are safe to play with small white fluffies they meet as dog equals, but I can't control interactions with strangers.

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The other owner didn't seem concerned when his dog was picked up and shaken like a stuffy toy? And could have been killed? What a heartless idiot! That concerns me (but doesn't surprise me). It's been said on here before, you can't fix stupid.

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According to my husband, no, the owner didn't seem that "present." He was in fact not even tightening the leash length on the other matching white fluffy. However, like I said, everything happened in a manner of seconds once my husband told him twice to control his dogs. But or course I still feel some responsibility. I am just sorry it happened at all and it will make me more vigilant than I was for the last 5 years that I have had my grey, which is unfortunate. Never even a hint of an incident before this other than he does alert to cats, but he has only seen a cat in a crate, never walking around.

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Gilly did the same thing in response to a small dog; he now wears his muzzle when we leave home. Like muddgirl, I also do not let him interact with dogs he does not know.

 

I view his muzzle as an insurance policy. The muzzle is insurance for me and the no meeting strange dogs is insurance for him!

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I agree about avoiding other dogs. I will walk the other way or out and around. Dogs on leashes often act differently than in an environment where they can get away.

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Yes, your dog was acting naturally (in a high-prey type way) to an extremely rude dog. That rude dog is lucky it's neck wasn't snapped--I know a dog that did kill a cat by shaking it until it's neck broke. However, it was not your fault or your husband's fault. It was the fault of that stupid owner.

 

By the way, I find the best response when an idiot owner tells me not to worry about their out of control dog because "it's okay, he's friendly". I yell back "It is not okay, my dog is NOT friendly!" I make it lout and sound angry and it tends to get the owner's attention. Yes, it makes my sweethearts sound mean, but I really don't care what some stupid owner thinks of them.

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I would feel bad for him to have to muzzle him. It would make him look like a vicious dog. I am sure that is what other people would think. I have never even owned a muzzle. But I understand your point.

 

Greyhounds spend a good a deal of their professional lives wearing muzzles; I don't think it bothers him all that much-- witness photographs of Greys sleeping with their muzzles on.

 

People frequently ask me about his muzzle and I explain immediately that he is wonderful with people but isn't too keen on small dogs and he wears the muzzle for their protection. I have yet to encounter anyone who has left the discussion with the impression Gilly is anything but a human love bug -- he wins people over with his sweet face and funny antics. Truth be told, there are people that have been afraid of dogs who he has won over and they are confident enough to even try to love on him now!

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I would feel bad for him to have to muzzle him. It would make him look like a vicious dog. I am sure that is what other people would think. I have never even owned a muzzle. But I understand your point.

The problem with having your dog wear a muzzle when walking him is if he is attacked he has no way to defend himself.

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Guest AmberGusDad

The problem with having your dog wear a muzzle when walking him is if he is attacked he has no way to defend himself.

 

Absolutely agree!

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The problem with having your dog wear a muzzle when walking him is if he is attacked he has no way to defend himself.

 

I hear what you are saying and I agree with you. Having said that, I am hyper-vigilant when out walking with him and go in the other direction if I see any dogs, so the likelihood of him being attacked is pretty smalI. If an off-leash dog started running towards him in an attempt to attack him believe me the muzzle would be off before the dog got close enough, and the dog would have to get through me first. Also, the majority of dogs in my neighborhood are small fluffies -- even though the danger is still there, I would be more afraid if there were large dogs around.

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Is it something to worry about? Well, yes, if you're a worrier. No, if you're a do-er. It's certainly something you need to deal with.

 

There are stupid people and rude dogs in the world. You have a dog with prey drive. Those are just facts, not judgments. Accept them and deal with it.

 

So - keep your eyes open for small dogs (or any dogs) off-leash, or on way to much leash. If you warn someone off and they don't get their dog away, change direction, shorten leash to nothing (like at the collar) , and get your dog away.

 

I've had high-prey dogs, and had incidents like yours that didn't end in an attack because I got my dog away. If I hadn't there'd have been a dead JRT in the vet's office parking lot. I'd have end up at fault.

 

The big dog is ALWAYS to blame. Protect your big dog by getting it the heck away from rude dogs and stupid owners. And don't be afraid to respond to "Oh my dog's just friendly" with "Mine is NOT. It will bite your dog!" Whether you believe it or not, it shocks people enough to protect and curb their own animals. So what if they think your dog is aggressive? You're avoiding an incident.

 

Just my way of dealing with it.

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Well as none of us were there to see the exact unfolding of the incident i don't think it's possible to say for sure why the greyhound acted this way, given that he apparently is fine with (all to date?) other small dogs. But there again, we can't see how he normally interacts with small fluffy dogs, only the owner knows that.

 

Certainly sounds as though the bad approach of the small dog elicited the reaction.

 

I think some greys do self defend by picking up the other dog, yes it's their instinct if you will, same way that other guarding breeds may pin rude dogs as a way of subduing them, as 'pinning down' is their instinct (their 'job') I heard once of a small female grey who got rushed by a very rude boxer dog and she controlled the boxer by picking it up in her mouth, a whole boxer dog! that was not a prey drive incident, it was a greyhoundy way of subduing a very rude large dog without injuring it.

 

The shaking part does sound prey drive but again we can't see exactly what happened or how violent the shaking was. If the dog got away in one piece (how come the grey let go?) it seems as though it wasn't a full on prey drive 'attack' but yes these things can escalate, or start off as defensive and turn into something else.

 

It's pretty good advice to not allow rude or aggressive dogs to approach your dog, but often easier said than done.

 

in the case of a real dog attack by a loose dog, it happens in split seconds, no time to remove muzzles and you'd need to be mentally and physically prepared to react instantly to remove the offending dog by force before it gets to your dog.

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My dog did this to a small white fluffy in a dog park once- we were in the large dog side and this dog was maybe 4 lbs. I honestly think he didn't realize it was a dog because he's been fine with other small dogs before. We don't go to the dog park anymore for this and other reasons. I don't think you have to muzzle, but just be aware of what your dog can and can't handle. In the future, if a little dog comes up like that, physically move him back! People need to be aware that when you say "my dog doesn't do well with little dogs" you mean it!

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BEST command for your dog to learn is DROP IT. We aren't sure if our dog is small dog safe, he is cat safe but even then its supervised.

My grey doesnt really see little dogs as dogs, they confuse him. Growling little dogs scare him. Big growling dogs he ignores..

 

It is something you need to know about your dog, he wasn't acting like a dog defending himself, he acted like a greyhound catching a rabbit.

 

Yes the little dog could be hurt, neck/back issues and bruising. BUT the other owner is at fault, you gave warning, they chose to ignore that. Then did not even seem to respond or react to the situation.

 

My rescue group firmly tells every adopter to not use those retractable leash things. I've seen a dogs leg cut open by it getting caught in the wire leash section. I've seen them break and dogs get into traffic with sadly a deadly accident for the dog. BUT those using them just brush it off and claim it wont happen to them. I had a friends dog get loose as she tied the darn thing by the leash to a pole in a mall parking lot, thankfully the dog ran to me and I caught her before anything bad could happen. I then got my spare leash frm the car and securely tied her up. (we were all having coffee together).

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In regards to picking up the white fluffy in my grey's mouth, I understand my dog rapidly scooped up white fluffy, then swing, swing, swing, toss! The white fluffy then was whimpering on the ground. (I just found this out from my husband). The owner went over to the dog but said nothing really, just when my husband asked him to keep the other dog on a shorter leash immediately he again said it would be okay. My husband and dog left then and the owner said nothing further. I certainly hope that white fluffy was not seriously hurt. I get the feeling from my dog that he is still upset by it. Kind of lethargic today. But maybe that is just me interpreting his feelings as remorse. I don't blame him, it was unexpected by us certainly, but I will be very, very cautious in the future for sure. As for the other dog, I hope he is okay.

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One more thing, this happened so, so fast, that we could not have gotten out a complete sentence to tell them our dog is not safe around small dogs (even if we knew this to be true). The fluffy ran for our dog, twice my husband said to pull back your dog, fluffy growled, and wham, he was in my grey's mouth. Then as above.

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Guest AmberGusDad

One more thing, this happened so, so fast, that we could not have gotten out a complete sentence to tell them our dog is not safe around small dogs (even if we knew this to be true). The fluffy ran for our dog, twice my husband said to pull back your dog, fluffy growled, and wham, he was in my grey's mouth. Then as above.

 

I believe you are being way too hard on yourself. Our ultra-liberal society is taking its toll.

 

We know the other dog was growling and came charging at him, period. Your dog was simply defending himself, period.

 

The fact that you have several white dogs in your neighborhood who do not charge him and are his friends dispells any thought of "high prey drive."

 

Several months ago I had a pitbull get loose from his owner. He charged at Nino. I simply took my police baton, extended it, and put a reasonable beating upon the aggressor. We all have not only a right to defend ourselves; we have a responsibility to do so.

 

Fire away....

 

Ed

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Yes the guilty party on this is the other dog owner. Your husband did what most owners are taught too. I know we were told to tell the other owner to back off, pull their dog back, then get between their dog and ours and move away as quick as possible. Seems like that is what your husband tried to do but due to not being a superhero couldnt do it in time.

 

Your dog was being a dog. He was on leash, he was at his owners side, HE was mostly controlled until that other dog came into his space and he reacted.

 

Also, dont put emotions on him now, most get over things once out of that situation. He is most likely picking up on your reactions.

 

I have a friend who has had to beat off another dog who was attacking her hound, you do what you have to to keep both YOU and the dog safe.

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I think people need to be clear that there is a difference between a dog defending itself (which will involve posturing, snarling, barking, then physical action which is sufficient to send the other dog on its way) and a prey drive response (picking a dog up and shaking it). I can tell you without doubt that my Hermon has physically defended me and the rest of the pack from an aggressive dog charging at us, but the most physical contact he made was at the throat/neck to flip the other dog onto it's back, exposing it's belly once the other dog submitted, he sniffed it and then stepped back, while the other dog took off. On the other hand, Paige and Brandi would both react by shaking a small dog as a result of prey drive.

 

It's important to recognise the difference because a prey driven dog will react even if the smaller animal is bopping along minding it's own business. A dog defending itself won't. In this instance, the two might be confused because of the aggression shown by the smaller dog, but the reaction by the grey is concerning and could spill over into other contexts where the blame is less clear cut.

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I think people need to be clear that there is a difference between a dog defending itself (which will involve posturing, snarling, barking, then physical action which is sufficient to send the other dog on its way) and a prey drive response (picking a dog up and shaking it).

Exactly.

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"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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