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sobesmom

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About sobesmom

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    Greyaholic
  • Birthday 09/22/1974

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    Female
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    North Central PA

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    Michele

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  1. Just one question - if you're traveling, and need to go into a store en route - I get it. But if you're at home, and need to go to the store - why would you take the dog? Am I missing something?
  2. I have a fenced yard, which rabbits made the mistake of coming into. My Sobe would nab them, quick head-shake to break the neck, then bring them to the door. Greyhounds are very efficient. No fear or pain, or playing with the prey. Kill quickly and done. And present the trophy to the master. It's ingrained. In regard to recall - I have no experience. I know that my dogs on-leash would've gone after a rabbit if they weren't on-leash. I think recall training is great - but it must have its limits. I can't imagine calling a grey off a rabbit - but other have done it. Do you live in the UK? Most posters on GT'ers are in the US - and we don't walk greys off-leash generally. It's just not "done" here. I know it's quite common in the UK, so those posters could probably give you the best advice.
  3. Retired racing greys are enormously adaptable. A 3 year old is just getting past the horrible, crazy puppy stage, and would be perfect if you want a young dog. I once fostered a 2 year old grey and swore I'd never go near one that young again! Way too high an energy level for this household.
  4. Congratulations!!! Thank you both for doing such greyt work!!!!!
  5. The Lewis Carroll reference made me chortle!!!! My SIL sent me a pic of chicken feet at a store labeled "Chicken Paws" - much chortling ensued. Maybe you should try those
  6. "A primary school girl said to me the other day how beautiful my girl is and that melted my heart " A pre-school girl once asked if me could pet my tiger. (My brindle greyhound, Diana). She was kinda orange, had stripes, so of course the girl though it was a tiger! She pronounced it "ti-goor". So cute!! Her mother told her "no, that's a dog, not a tiger". The little girl - big eyes - insisted "No mommy - it's a TI-GOOR and I wanna pet it!!" So of course I told her she could pet my Tiger!!!!!! The mom scowled at me but I didn't care! She probably went to preschool the next day and told everyone she petted a Tiger!!!
  7. Enjoy the good responses and dismiss the negative. You can try to educate people, but if they're stuck in their ways, just move on. You're response seems fine to me. You tried. Getting upset or angry doesn't fix anything. Many of us have had similar experiences. I had one guy insist that my big black greyhound was a Doberman. I explained that he was a greyhound, and the guy told me that I was an idiot and that I was walking a Doberman, and all Dobermans are killers. Not fair to Dobermans by any means!!! So, he had a prejudice against another breed, and didn't even know the difference. I told him I'd be sure to let the greyhound rescue that I got the dog from know about their "mistake" and wished him a good day. Also, the muzzle law in Australia probably gave people the impression that greys are aggressive. That's such a shame, and I'm glad it's been repealed. By the way - your written English is excellent! You have no need to apologize for it.
  8. Use your judgement. Err on the side of safety. If she's only there for a few days, fine, muzzle. If she's going to be there longer, I'd phase them out.
  9. I did homecooked for Diana when she was in her last year of renal failure, and it was easy, cheap, and she did actually ate it. She wouldn't eat the renal kibble.
  10. Sounds pretty normal for the weather change, especially with a new dog. I agree with the others. Some other things I've used are raw eggs on the food, Jack Mackeral, and fish oil capsules. Of course, start slow with anything. They can all be diuretics if given too much, too soon. Frequent brushing, no bathing.
  11. Woo hoo!! Progress!!! Good for you for trying different things, figuring out what helps, and adapting! Greyt job!!!! You're really making progress pretty quickly (although I'm sure it doesn't feel like it in your shoes).
  12. I'd suggest a nice long brisk walk or vigorous play session in the evening. If you have a place for her to run - do it. A 2 year old grey is a puppy, and puppies need LOT of exercise. The ONLY 2 year old grey I've had in my home was my Diana, and I swore I'd never do it again. Up side - I lost 20 lb's in the first few months we had her from walking, running, playing with her. Puppies need to MOVE. I'm not surprised that it took a month for her to change. Some Greys go into a kind of shock when they're first adopted. They're basically perfect zombies for a month or 2. Then - they get comfortable, and you have to deal with stuff. More exercise, for her body, and her brain. If she's crated, she has a TON of energy to expend!!! A tired puppy is a happy puppy (and a happy human, because you then get to sleep). Not a criticism at all.... just experience. I never took another foster under the age of 4 after Diana. One 2 year old was more than enough for me.
  13. That's exactly what I did with most of mine. But for the outliers..... gotta do something different. I was 9 foster in before I had to get "creative".
  14. Full disclosure - box walking isn't a proven training method. It was something suggested to me, and it worked for me, for some dogs. I just thow it out there as one of the options you could try. But - you've learned some stuff by trying it. She's not ready to go for walks into the big bad world I'd absolutely keep it as close to home as possible based on what you've said. And - my original premise stands that box-walking happens right outside your door. Going nowhere. If you have to go somewhere else, the distractions could be rough, and undermine the point of it. I used the backyard because it was RIGHT there. Safe. Close. That's the point. You never leave home. Box walking training won't work if you have to walk to a park to do it. And yes - she's going to hate it, and be terrible at it for a few days. All of mine took 2-5 days to figure it out, doing it 4 times per day. The point isn't her getting good at box walking, the point is her gaining confidence on-leash. Sooooo.... maybe you could circle walk! Right outside the door, walk in a big circle over and over. Gain confidence. Maybe the structure of the box doesn't work for Arrow. That's fine. Do a circle. Close to home. Gain confidence! Then we move on! But stay home. That's the thing. The longest I ever box walked my spookiest foster was 6 days. He hated it and was confused for 3 days. He got into the routine after that, and became confident. He wasn't ready for the scary sights, smells, etc out there before that Then we went outside the yard a half mile, he peed, I praised, and we we right back home, and I praised and gave him a treat. Every walk was a little bit bigger after that. You need to figure out what works for Arrow. The world is too big, and too scary for her right now. Narrow her world. Let her gain confidence in a small world, then expand slowly. Arrow has a an owner that cares enough to try really hard, and reach out of help. She's a very lucky grey.
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