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Off Leash Recall: What Do You Want To Know?


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Hello, greyhound friends! Long time no post!


I'm writing an article on teaching off leash recall. This is something I'm pretty well-versed in, but I want to be as comprehensive as possible, so I'm coming to you guys for help.


Is this something that interests you?

What do you need to know about it?

Have you tried it? Did you succeed? Why, or why not?


Thanks in advance!

| Rachel | Dewty, Trigger, and Charlotte | Missing Dazzle, Echo, and Julio |

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Learn what your greyhound's life was like before becoming part of yours!
"The only thing better than the cutest kitty in the world is any dog." -Daniel Tosh

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to me it's one of the MOST important things an owner can teach their dog. stay is the other- both can help in a dangerous situation.

 

i've been working at making sure ALL of my dogs know it and that's their recall is reliable. RELIABLE is the key word.

 

Obviously i teach and do it all the time. Each dog has had their own personal style of learning a recall.

 

The most difficult dog was a saluki who just refused to pay attention when being called. a wise crew at obedience training fixed that. i stood still, did the recall- my stubborn dog Kata sat 25 feet away and was attached to a long line(a thin one) 30 feet long. I said,"KATA COME!" the gentleman behind me reeled him in. He quickly realized that he HAD to come and got with the program. Kata was the most difficult dog- not at all motivated by food, totally as aloof as salukis can be. The one time fishing event did not mar him, he just learned that I meant business. Upon testing at the end of the semester his score was 198 out of 200. I had 2 points taken off for handler errors.

 

I always praise my dogs with a ridiculous amount of love and kisses when i practice recalls. one may not always have food on hand and i want them to expect affection.

 

Methods, times and attitudes have changed in obedience training since the mid-70s. but i will say his recall was perfect after that and i'm sure it most likely would have saved his life if he was in a situation where i needed to use it for safety measures. he was a charm at the beach and parks after training.

Edited by cleptogrey
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Very interested!

 

I'm really interested in training for different contexts ie more and less familiar. Thought we'd cracked it with Charlie on our usual walk, running between me and my girlfriend when we call him. However take him somewhere new and he won't come back at all as everything is much more interesting. So it would be great if progression could be covered, from front room to open space and with distractions.

 

 

Also specific difficulties with sighthounds / prey driven dogs and the different challenges compared to other breeds eg collies or labs.

 

Can't wait to read.

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Guest normaandburrell

I think recall is the most important thing to teach a dog. However, with my current dog I am interested in teaching the drop during recall.

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Guest Johberry

What a great post and cheers to you for doing this! As first-time greyhound owners, YES, we would love to learn recall. Our boy picks and chooses to come when called. Most helpful would be tips on teaching a reliable recall, ideal places for those who don't have a yard (like us apt dwellers), long-line lengths, how to get started. Basically, anything and everything. Thank you in advance. Cheers! :)

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Are you looking for simple recall training info or is this for the purpose of walking a greyhound of leash?

 

If the latter I will offer the following:

 

Even more important than the training IMO is the nature of the dog. Obviously low prey and all dog friendly is most important but after that, is the dog one that gets anxious when its people are moving away or get out of site and will look to find and follow them even if not called? I would always worry that a dog that may have good recall in a training situation will run or wander off to greet other dogs, follow a scent etc., regardless of recall. People must the priority in the dogs mind.

 

Will the dog run in an area that is unsafe? Some greys get excited and will run anywhere. Others will refuse if the space or surface isn’t just right. This is a real safety valve.

 

As for the environment, is the area safe enough so that you are confident your dog will not be injured or lost if you should become separated from it? This means low or no traffic, and natural boundaries such as rivers, fences, dense bush that the dog will not cross.

 

And finally, never off leash in a new area. Establish a route that the dog learns before granting off leash privileges.

Edited by KickReturn
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Thanks, guys!

 

I don't have a publish date for the article right now but I will be sure to post it here to follow up with everyone who responded. :)

| Rachel | Dewty, Trigger, and Charlotte | Missing Dazzle, Echo, and Julio |

dewttrigsnowsig.jpg
Learn what your greyhound's life was like before becoming part of yours!
"The only thing better than the cutest kitty in the world is any dog." -Daniel Tosh

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Oh also motivation. We went to a class and the spaniels and German shepherds were super motivated and got their toy when they did what they were asked but, given the choice our grey would rather not have the treat and not do anything. I'd love to understand how to motivate.

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I'll be honest and tell you that I and a few grey owners that I know think true recall is a lost cause. We can get reasonable recall in reasonable situations - but if something bad happens - it's a fail. We've all had greys bolt and not even seem to hear us at all. Even after recall training. The ears shut off in a bad panic situation when you need recall the most. Like a dog that slips a collar, jumps a fence or goes bolting toward the road. I almost lost my Diana and a foster to a semi-truck when they got tangled in leashes and broke the clasps. They DIDN'T hear me as they bolted to the road.

 

I tell you this just as a "know your audience" tip. Part of your audience is very skeptical about true recall for greys in an emergency situationd. Don't talk down to us or tell us we just didn't try hard enough. Teach us something new that we can believe in.

 

I'm looking forward to your article. BTW - please don't take my comments as negative. They're not meant to be.

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I'll be honest and tell you that I and a few grey owners that I know think true recall is a lost cause. We can get reasonable recall in reasonable situations - but if something bad happens - it's a fail. We've all had greys bolt and not even seem to hear us at all. Even after recall training. The ears shut off in a bad panic situation when you need recall the most. Like a dog that slips a collar, jumps a fence or goes bolting toward the road. I almost lost my Diana and a foster to a semi-truck when they got tangled in leashes and broke the clasps. They DIDN'T hear me as they bolted to the road.

 

I agree with this 100% and we rarely use a leash, and have never had a recall failure. If an environment holds the potential for a "panic situation" than the leash has to stay on (with a properly fitted collar). The same could probably be said for many dogs of all breeds. The problem with the greyhound of course is that their panic response is to run. Indeed everyone should train recall for emergency purposes, but true safety will come from keeping a greyhound secure in the first place, spotting trouble before it escalates, and preventing emergencies.

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I'll be honest and tell you that I and a few grey owners that I know think true recall is a lost cause. We can get reasonable recall in reasonable situations - but if something bad happens - it's a fail. We've all had greys bolt and not even seem to hear us at all. Even after recall training. The ears shut off in a bad panic situation when you need recall the most. Like a dog that slips a collar, jumps a fence or goes bolting toward the road. I almost lost my Diana and a foster to a semi-truck when they got tangled in leashes and broke the clasps. They DIDN'T hear me as they bolted to the road.

 

I tell you this just as a "know your audience" tip. Part of your audience is very skeptical about true recall for greys in an emergency situationd. Don't talk down to us or tell us we just didn't try hard enough. Teach us something new that we can believe in.

 

I'm looking forward to your article. BTW - please don't take my comments as negative. They're not meant to be.

 

This is very helpful. Thank you!

| Rachel | Dewty, Trigger, and Charlotte | Missing Dazzle, Echo, and Julio |

dewttrigsnowsig.jpg
Learn what your greyhound's life was like before becoming part of yours!
"The only thing better than the cutest kitty in the world is any dog." -Daniel Tosh

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  • 2 months later...

Hi again, folks! I promised to share the link to the article once it was posted. I finally launched my new blog today, and here it is!

 

Reliable Recall, Part 1: The How and Why of Training Recall in Dogs

| Rachel | Dewty, Trigger, and Charlotte | Missing Dazzle, Echo, and Julio |

dewttrigsnowsig.jpg
Learn what your greyhound's life was like before becoming part of yours!
"The only thing better than the cutest kitty in the world is any dog." -Daniel Tosh

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I would never trust my two off the leash unless they were in an enclosed area. I think it could be a disaster just waiting to happen. And I am adding a Galgo to the mix, so I would not even try off leash. Just my humble opinion.

Thanks Walliered I'm with you. Trust-with a greyhound-can be a deadly disease. Not worth the risk to me either. They have been hardwired for 5000 years to scan, find, and chase- independent of man- and I don't believe an obedience command will over ride this. My hounds, like yours, are NEVER EVER off leash in an unenclosed area-I don't feel like betting their life that their obedience will over ride their DNA. JMO.

Edited by racindog
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Regardless if you intentionally let your dog off leash or not, EVERY dog should be trained with recall. Accidents happen, no matter how careful you try to be.

 

Well done, Rachel :)


Meredith with Heyokha (HUS Me Teddy) and Crow (Mike Milbury). Missing Turbo (Sendahl Boss), Pancho, JoJo, and "Fat Stacks" Juana, the psycho kitty. Canku wakan kin manipi.

"Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." - Voltaire

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Excellent! It's completely okay not to trust your pup off leash (and even more acceptable for greyhound people, given the breed tendencies). But I definitely think that taking the first steps into the training and keeping up with it is very important for ANY dog! :) I'd love to hear how it goes!

| Rachel | Dewty, Trigger, and Charlotte | Missing Dazzle, Echo, and Julio |

dewttrigsnowsig.jpg
Learn what your greyhound's life was like before becoming part of yours!
"The only thing better than the cutest kitty in the world is any dog." -Daniel Tosh

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Excellent! It's completely okay not to trust your pup off leash (and even more acceptable for greyhound people, given the breed tendencies). But I definitely think that taking the first steps into the training and keeping up with it is very important for ANY dog! :) I'd love to hear how it goes!

:nod :nod :nod:)


Meredith with Heyokha (HUS Me Teddy) and Crow (Mike Milbury). Missing Turbo (Sendahl Boss), Pancho, JoJo, and "Fat Stacks" Juana, the psycho kitty. Canku wakan kin manipi.

"Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." - Voltaire

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Hey, that hamburger story is familiar. Although unless there are multiple people hiding fast food on trails, it was actually a McGriddle. ;)

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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Hey, that hamburger story is familiar. Although unless there are multiple people hiding fast food on trails, it was actually a McGriddle. ;)

You do that, too?! :D The account I was referring to was actually from a YouTube video I watched a few years ago. It's a good trick!

| Rachel | Dewty, Trigger, and Charlotte | Missing Dazzle, Echo, and Julio |

dewttrigsnowsig.jpg
Learn what your greyhound's life was like before becoming part of yours!
"The only thing better than the cutest kitty in the world is any dog." -Daniel Tosh

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