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Looking To Adopt For The First Time


Guest echen
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Guest echen

Hey guys,

 

I'm new around here, and I've been looking to adopt my first greyhound. I have space for two, but I've heard mixed reviews about adopting two at the same time, but much of the advice isn't greyhound specific. I was hoping to adopt a bonded pair, but after sniffing around the internet I'm having second thoughts. What say you, greyhound experts :)?

 

Blessings,

 

Eric

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Guest IrskasMom

Eric WELCOME to GT :wave:wave:wave Please go to a Rescue Group in your Area and check it out.Sometimes and mostly they have Guys/Girls who get along well and you would want to adopt. :):):)

Edited by IrskasMom
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I guess there are advantages and disadvantages to adopting two. It might be beneficial to get used to the breed with one before adopting another. It also means twice the food bills, twice the medical bills, etc. Advantages would include less chance of separation anxiety and happier dogs. I started out with one[ Phoenix was much happier after I adopted #2.

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Xavi the galgo and Allen the cat. Missing Iker the galgo ?-Feb.9/19, Treasure (USS Treasure) April 12/01-May 6/13, Phoenix (Hallo Top Son) Dec.14/99-June 4/11 and Loca (Reko Swahili) Oct.9/95 - June 1/09.

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Guest PhillyPups

:wvae Hi, welcome to GT :wave

 

I am not the one to state numbers. :lol

 

I started with one, got familiar with the breed and with Runner. Within 2 months, due to a severely failed foster (fostered under 5 minutes) I had a second. Greyhounds do like the company of other greyhounds.

 

As said before, check with your local adoption group.

 

Good luck and please keep us posted.

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Hi and Welcome !!

 

I think you should adopt one Greyhound to start out with. If you are like most of us, you'll be adding more - soon. lol.gif

 

With one dog, you can really bond with them, and focus your time ALL on this dog - training will go quickly, and the hound will soon settle in to your way of life. With one dog, you can fit it in the back seat of any vehicle and easily travel. Greyhounds love to go places and do things with you. and - They are just great buddies to hang with.

 

You will learn what it is to be one of the guardians of these unique creatures.

 

When you bring your second hound home, he/she will learn about its new life faster, as your first Greyhound will do a good job of showing the new addition the "rules" of the house. Dogs learn from each other.

 

Welcome to the Cult Club! wink.gif

 

Please keep us updated when you adopt your dog - we love to read about happy beginnings!

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CORY and CRICKET - Solitary Tremble & CASPER - Pj's Mia Farrow
* With CAPT. GUS - Solitary Trigger, RAINY - Peach Rain, PUP - Red Zepher, DOC - CTW Fort Sumpter
and MAX - Shiowa's Silver Maxamillion / Afghan .... all waiting at the bridge

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Guest NeroAmber

I have two now, but I started off with one- Nero, and while he's been happier since I've got #2, and has lost his SA, I am happy that I got Nero alone first, I got to know him, and get used to his routine, and get used to the breed, so I was more prepared to care for two. There wasn't much of a gap between me getting #2, but I think it helped me.

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Guest kydie

:welcome so glad you joined us, I have one grey, but he came to an already established pack, dogs are pack animals, and greys are used to living in a pack, although some like to be only pets, just remember, as stated, as many as you have 2,3,4, that is the cost

Your adoption group can set you up with a bonded pair, if that is what you have your heart set on, and good for you if you can manage to take 2 at a time :thumbs-up

Edited by kydie
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Welcome!

 

"Bonded pair" doesn't so much apply; most greyhounds love all other greyhounds. It's a "greyhound thing." As dogs who stay with their siblings 24/7 for (normally) more than a year, and dogs who are surrounded by others of their kind their entire lives (until retirement), they dig each other! As with anything, their are exceptions.

 

If you go with TWO, you may eliminate some of the early issues that CAN arise with a hound separated for the first time from other hounds. You may not. Are you PHYSICALLY able to handle two dogs who will weigh anywhere from 50-85 pounds? At the same time? Knowing it could be they have not been trained to walked nicely on a leash? Been house broken? Ever seen a shiny floor, a mirror, or a TV? It's a lot to take on for someone unfamiliar with the ins and outs of houndie ownership!

 

Find a good adoption group local to you, go visit more than once, let them get to know YOU, and ask their sage advice!

 

Have fun and good luck!


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Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

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Good advice above. I'll add that a challenge is simply coordinating two dogs learning things at the same time. If that doesn't phase you, then go for it. If the group you choose has foster dogs, the learning (floors, stairs, etc) is lessened. It is really exciting and if you are confident in your patience levels and put the hounds first in your decisions over the first few months, then two would be just fine. Our #2 came about 3 weeks after our first - unplanned! We got wind of a littermate coming into our group so we surely couldn't refuse! For us, double dogs is not double the work - about 20% more effort but they clearly take solace with each other's company. Despite being siblings, I wouldn't say they are super bonded together but they do like having company in the yard to run and laze around with! Think things through and make sure your decisions are in the best interest of your hounds and you will be just fine!

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Follow my Ironman journeys and life with dogs, cats and busy kids: A long road

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

Congrats on looking for your first, and possibly second greyhound. If you do want a "bonded pair" I would suggest you go to a group and ask for a "returned" pair. There are occasions that arise where someone has two greyhounds and has to relinquish them to a group for one reason or another (financial or life-changing event such as nursing home situation), that has nothing to do with the greyhounds being poor pets. In this scenario it should be very easy to bring them into your home as they are already used to being in a home, as well as with each other. I am an adoption rep and we have had a family do just this, let me tell you, it has been wonderful for both the hounds and new adopters.

 

Chad

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I saw two! One was two lonely for me so I got #2 six weeks later. They are perfect together. Two is my perfect number. Greyhounds are such easygoing dogs that I think adopting two at once is a great idea.

| Rachel | Dewty, Trigger, and Charlotte | Missing Dazzle, Echo, and Julio |

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Learn what your greyhound's life was like before becoming part of yours!
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Guest brandi007

Going to agree with what Chad said, if you did want a bonded pair go for a returned pair. They'll be used to living in a home, going potty outside (unless you ended up with my black one...haha!) and it'd be a heck of a lot less overwhelming for you.

 

I wouldn't go for 2 short term fostered dogs or track dogs as a first time adopter though. Best of luck, you're about to make the best decision of your life!

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Guest SusanP

We got #2 within 2 months of #1, in large part because #1 seemed rather lost without a doggy friend. Hounds need homes, and splitting up a bonded pair always seems so sad... if you have the resources I'd say go for 2 from the start. Good luck to you!

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Guest mom2hounds

Hey guys,

 

I'm new around here, and I've been looking to adopt my first greyhound. I have space for two, but I've heard mixed reviews about adopting two at the same time, but much of the advice isn't greyhound specific. I was hoping to adopt a bonded pair, but after sniffing around the internet I'm having second thoughts. What say you, greyhound experts :)?

 

Blessings,

 

Eric

Hi Eric

Welcome to GT. I am a new greyhound owner. We got her a month ago and she has adjusted well. We already had two mixed breed dogs that she has become friends with. I think having other dogs has made the transition easier. We have not had any problems with seperation anxiety, house breaking, or stairs. She just does what the other dogs do. As to your question, I think it depends on the specific dogs your are considering and your prior dog experience. Do the greys have issues? Have they been in a home before? Are they housebroken? Have you had dogs before? Do you know how to handle training issues? I think the best thing to do would be to have a long discussion with the rescue you are going to adopt from. Tell them all about your family, home, dog experience, and lifestyle. That is what we did and they pointed us to 3 different dogs that the thought would be the best fit for us. We did pick one of the 3 they suggested and we just love her. Our grey has been the easiest dog to bring into our home. Good luck with your decision.

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I would think it would be easier to adopt one... get it used to this new-world of your home and then bring in a second. I think it would be really overwhelming to deal with 2 new-to-the-outside-world dogs.

But the idea of bringing home a returned pair, is a super idea too... they would not have the training issues and you would really be helping a pair of dogs who already love one another and might be harder to adopt (just since they are coming as a pair)

 

Can't wait to hear about your new dogs!

Amy and Tim in Beverly, MA, with Chase and Always missing Kingsley (Drama King) and Ruby (KB's Bee Bopper).

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Hi and welcome to GT! You didn't say if you've had dogs before. If you have then I agree with the suggestions about talking to your local group. With the economy over the last year there have been unfortunate situations where people just simply couldn't afford to keep their dogs any longer. In that case if you wanted to get a "bonded pair" starting with two might not be so challenging.

 

But if you start out with a hound straight from the track or one that's only been in foster for a short time then I'd start with just one. I'd always had dogs before but never a greyhound and even though my first hound was a bounce I was glad that I started with just him. It gave me time to bond with him and just take in all the wonderful "quirks" a greyhound can have. Within 6 months I adopted a female that had also been a bounce and Rowdy was much happier having another dog in the house.

 

Good luck with whatever you choose to do.

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Obviously you are going to get advice all over the board so to speak. But the only factor in the equation that will make the difference is you. If you have had dogs before especially large dogs, if you are a multiple vs a single preference kind of person; easy going or uptight etc. And if you are ready for the financial implications that two at once mean. You always double you food costs and some vet costs but the initial outlay can be a bit pricey. One added later can be less of a financial hit. Otherwise really I think the case can be made either way.

 

I love having more than one. I found having the first one as a single for awhile very helpful but always had the intention of getting another. Hey there is that too!

If you space it out, you get to have the excitement of getting a new dog twice rather than just once!

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Susan, Jessie and Jordy NORTHERN SKY GREYHOUND ADOPTION ASSOCIATION

Jack, in my heart forever March 1999-Nov 21, 2008 My Dancing Queen Jilly with me always and forever Aug 12, 2003-Oct 15, 2010

Joshy I will love you always Aug 1, 2004-Feb 22,2013 Jonah my sweetheart May 2000 - Jan 2015

" You will never need to be alone again. I promise this. As your dog, I will sing this promise to you, and whisper it to you at night, every night, with my breath." Stanley Coren

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Guest echen

Wow, you guys are great--sixteen replies overnight.

 

Warning, very verbose post:

 

Anyway, I live in Southern California, so I've submitted my application to GPA-LA/OC, GreySave, and Adopt-a-Star.

 

I probably should tell you guys a little about myself.

 

I am a young grad student going to Loma Linda University School of Dentistry. I've always had dogs in my life, but my four years living in UCLA thwarted me from satisfying my penchant for pooches. Since I will be living in a home (that I own) with only one other roomate, I thought it would be nice to have dogs again and give needy hounds a forever home. I've had larger breeds in the past--boxer, dalmatian, to name a few. However, that was in high school, when I could spend an hour to do a 2-3 mile run with those seemingly inexhaustible dogs. My schedule at Loma Linda is Mon and Wed 8AM-5PM (with one hour lunch break where I can go back home to let the dogs out), and 8AM-12PM TUE, THUR, FRI. I've saved up for the very purpose of having dogs, but was quite discouraged when Bonnie from GreySave told me that a life of a grad student probably was not "stable" enough for a greyhound. (She was very nice through it all though). However, Adopt-a-Star called me and didn't feel like that would be a problem because they said greyhounds are indeed adaptable and many couples have 9-5 schedules and own greyhounds at the same time. I'm not a socialite, so I don't think that I'll be spending my free time or weekends anywhere else than home or taking the dogs to hike or something.

 

Because I've had dogs before I know that they do demand training (the boxer and dal were both canine good citizens) and individual care. That's why I steered clear of other breeds that have more demanding exercise and special needs, and found the greyhound. At first I was very skeptical about them, not because of their bad rap as racers, but skeptical about their laziness. I would hate to do a dog the disservice of poor ownership, but from what I've been reading online they do seem a lot more contented than other dogs. Albeit, more delicate and sensitive, but that humanness is what really attracts me to the breed. They remind me of a poodle I had back when I was a kid. Her name was Lady, and she was totally not dog. Her eyes look straight into your soul. That's the feeling I get when I see pictures of greyhounds staring at their owners.

 

As a Christian, the notion of adoption, rescuing from a meaningless life of running in circles, forever home, gratefulness, and relationship strike a chord with my heart. I've always wanted a doberman, but after getting more acquainted to greyhounds, I could care less about barking, guarding, jogging, obedience trials, and the such. I would like to give my resources to dogs that need them and would appreciate them. Taking a step back and really evaluating my situation, I don't think I would be able to provide a dobie with a home that would realize his/her potential. Not to say that greyhounds are a back-up breed in any way, I've pretty much fell in love with them almost 3 weeks ago, scouring the internet, youtube videos, online articles about them, and eating up houndstooth4, neversaynevergreyhounds, and genji's corner blogs like you wouldn't believe.

 

On a more selfish note, I think dogs are therapeutic. I hate throwing out cliche dog quotes, but dogs make us human. I think it no coincidence that God and dog are anagrams, though I pray God forgive me if that was in anyway blasphemous because I didn't intend that to be. It would be great if a pair of dogs flanked my side to weather the storms of dental school and...life... Who knows, I might need a few needles noses to point the way when things get murky...

 

So all in all. I think I'm in too deep. Darn it. No turning back.

 

BTW: Does anyone have experience with Adopt-a-Star. They say they have a custom matching system where they pick the dogs out for you from the track, and not necessarily from the foster home. My impression is that they select the dogs off the track, do the medical stuff, foster them for a couple of weeks to iron out the transition kinks, and then place them. I would expect that behavior is hard to predict coming off the track, but then again, they've been doing this a lot longer than I have, so what do I know. Not to say that any of you are old or anything, but the feeling I get (especially from pictures of meet and greets and picnics, etc) is that greyhound owners tend to be older, married, settled. This makes me slightly nervous because I think my young age won't help in the adoption process, but I really have given all this a lot of thought. But I do feel a lot more at ease that there are greyhound experts at the other end of cyberspace almost jumping at the chance to answer my every question. It is indeed sort of cultish, but I like it :P. You guys are crazy about your hounds...

Edited by echen
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Each adoption group will have its own standards and adoption requirements, so I think it's mostly how comfortable you are working with each group. I will say that the more honest and truthful you are with the adoption reps about your lifestyle and wishes, the better match you'll get, regardless of the group. It sounds like you've thought about this a lot and that's only a plus. Make sure you're committed to giving these dogs a home for life and not just to "rescue" them.

 

Both my husband and I have had dogs (big and small) all our lives before adopting our first greyhound. There *is* something very special about this breed! But they're not necessarily dogs for people with very active lifestyles. I always tell people they're like cats with really long legs! Obviously, not all greyhounds are complete couch-potatoes, and many love love love to get out and go. For the most part, I would say that they love doing things WITH their people, and not just to be doing something. They are very much companion animals.

 

What I would suggest is asking the groups (or whichever one you feel most comfortable with) if they have volunteer activities that you can help out with so you can have some contact with the breed. Go to meet-n-greets in your area and talk to actual greyhound owners. Pet their dogs and see if they feel like the right breed for you.

 

Then, once you've determined 1) if you can afford two, and 2) if you *really* want two, you can discuss adopting with a group. Returns are way more common nowadays due to the economy and they are a great way to go for first-time adopters.

 

Good luck and keep us posted!

Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

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Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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Guest Samantha

Hello there from the UK!

 

Ive had Maddison 1 month now, I got her straight from the kennels (she never raced, she was kept to be bred from, but was never used) I didn't adopt through a adoption group, purely because my Dad bred greyhounds, and has connections in the racing industry. Im already thinking about adopting another grey and have my eye on a boy at a local adoption group :lol , Ive found even though Maddison had no experience of being in a family home, she adjusted and fit in almost right away. Also..Im a single Mom and im 28 so im not in the 'settled greyhound owner' group you spoke about :lol:lol .

 

No advice really, just wanted to say Hi!.

 

Wether you get 1 or 2...they will change your life forever :)

 

Get ready to welcome a angel into your life :) (or maybe 2 ;) )

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Guest FastDogsOwnMe

If you find the right pair, I see no problem with it. Be honest about your dog experience. In some ways, a pair who feed off one another and are used to a home are probably about as easy as it gets. Most greys are not crazy about being only dogs, though some actually NEED to be only dogs. I wouldn't ever have just one dog or even just two :lol so I am not the one to ask. Had dogs since I was born.

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A lot of good advice. Chad really summed it up. If you can, go for a pair of returned dogs who otherwise would more than likely be seperated. Having someone like you come a long for them would be just an awesome thing to do.So many returns due to the ecomony.

Edited by RobinM

 

 

ROBIN ~ Mom to: Beau Think It Aint, Chloe JC Allthewayhome, Teddy ICU Drunk Sailor, Elsie N Fracine , Ollie RG's Travertine, Ponch A's Jupiter~ Yoshi, Zoobie & Belle, the kitties.

Waiting at the bridge Angel Polli Bohemian Ocean , Rocky, Blue,Sasha & Zoobie & Bobbi

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Another note -- if you haven't already, it's nice to let the adoption groups know that you have submitted multiple applications. Much of the work is done by volunteers, and before they go all out for you, they'll want to check that you aren't already getting a dog (or dogs!) from another group. Good luck with your search. I found greyhounds to be a saving grace during grad school -- a refreshing change of pace and focus.

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remembering Eve, Baz, Scout, Romie, Nutmeg, and Jeter

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