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Getting Hound To Jump In The Car


Guest jaws4evr
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Guest jaws4evr

Hi all, I'm brand new here. We adopted our first hound in November. She's such a great dog, and enjoys being in the car. We have a Mazda3 hatchback. The issue is, she will NOT jump in. She's randomly jumped in on her own once, but other than that fluke, I have to do a front end/back end boost combination, which is fine, however it'd be way easier and faster if she'd just jump in herself.

 

I've tried to encourage her to jump in herself, and she'll put her front feet up, but then will just try to "pull" herself up with her front feet, and try to step up with her hind feet. The car is too high for her to ever physically do this, she'll have to jump. After a bit of her trying to do her ineffective method, I'll boost her before she gets too anxious about it. Once in the car she's happy and fairly relaxed.

 

Any tips on teaching her to jump in by herself? I was thinking of sitting inside myself with a spoon of peanut butter (high value?), but I'm worried after her failing she'll shut down to the entire idea if she doesn't have a success, which I obviously don't want.

 

Thanks!

Edited by jaws4evr
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Someone previously posted directions showing how they made some lightweight steps that let their dog walk into the van or car. The stepss were made out of styrofoam blocks. It's been so long that I don't remember who posted it, and can't find the post through searching.

 

Someone will be along with those directions. Not sure if they will work for your vehicle but if they will then it's an easy solution.

 

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Guest sorenkkg

I'd love to see those myself... I have a small SUV (mitsubishi outlander) and while the tailgate is quite low, they put their feet up and I boost them in, the back-end, like you said.

 

The ONE time I saw one jump in was during a long drive, we stopped at a rest stop/gas station, and we parked near a grassy spot, so I backed up to it.

 

So getting back in the car, the tailgate was much closer to the ground since I had backed right up to the curb, and BOTH were able to jump in. No teaching, no bribes.

 

So I think maybe, for us anyway, it's a height thing.

 

Hope you find something that works!

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One of my guys just won't jump into the truck. This is the same dog that scaled a baby gate more than once. He is just not a truck jumper. Of course, he is the biggest and heaviest of the three.

Irene Ullmann w/Flying Odin in Lower Delaware
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Steps: http://forum.greytalk.com/index.php/topic/232476-homemade-dog-steps/

 

Maybe a bit bulky for a Mazda 3 but you might need only 1 "step" for the height? If she's a young, agile dog with no injuries, can also practice with freshly sauteed chicken liver or hot dog slices -- there are exceptions but most dogs will jump for those.

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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Guest AGirlNamedMe

Princess Bella doesn't jump. She will put her paws up and then wait for you to lift her bottom.

 

We know she can jump because she jumps happily onto our up high bed.

 

Weirdo. :wub:

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Guest Swifthounds

I recall someone posting some good "baby step" directions for teaching dogs to jump into vehicles, but I couldn't find them in a quick search.

 

All of mine have learned to jump into the car by themselves, no matter the vehicle. We've had passenger cars, a mini van, and SUVs along the way. It took time, patience, positive reinforcement, and some tasty treats, but they catch on. The only reason I could see preventing a dog from being able to do it is a preexisting injury or old age.

 

Even my old men (12 & 13) jump in on their own most of the time. It's only when they're tired after a long day (like at Dewey or GIG) that they need the hind end boost or the easier (for me) "lift and in."

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Guest Bang_o_rama

I noticed today that the command "up" (well, more like "up up up up up up up GOOD DOG!" as she climbs each flight) that I have been using every time we climb the stairs after a walk seemed to make her hop into the back seat of the 2-dr Civic, which was pretty neat.

 

Bang would also jump into a bonfire after some peanut butter.

~D~

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I have always used the command Kennel up and they seem to know what that means and jump into my Jeep without reservation

Supposedly this works better with females than males as they tend to be the dog kept in the top crates, it's definitely worth trying first.

 

Other suggestions if it doesn't:

 

1. Get some really yummy bits of human food - hot dog, cheese, steak, McDonald's hamburger, whatever and show it to her, then toss it into the car out of reach. Make sure she sees you toss it in there. If she jumps in on her own, let her eat hte food as a reward (heck, you might just try the whole hamburger hte first time, pretty sure if it works you'll never have to do it again ;) ). If not, proceed to #2.

 

2. Leash her up, have the hatch open and have treats in your pocket (like those described above, no boring kibble or dog treats for this). Face the hatch from about 5-8 feet away, keeping her leash short. Say "let's go" in a very sing songy voice and job her toward the hatch. Her choices will be to slam on the breaks or just hop in - good chance she'll hop in. If she does, reward immediately with lots of those yummy treats s and give effusive praise. If not, proceed to #3.

 

3. This was what eventually worked for Zuri, who was a pain in the butt to teach to get in the car, it requires a second person. Stand at the open back side door, reach into the car and grab the end of the leash from your friend, who is standing at the back of the hatch with the dog. Then, VERY gently pull on teh leash so there is just the slightest bit of pressure on the collar and call your dog to you in the most animated voice you can muster. If she jumps in, reward with lots of praise and yummy treats. If not, proceed to #4.

 

4. Resign yourself to a lifetime of lifting your dog into the car or buy/make stairs. ;)

 

ETA: If she's more motivated by other things, don't feel restricted by my advice to use treats. Use her absolute favorite toy (made even more enticing by hiding it for a few days before you do it), a pB stuffed kong, a bully stick, whatever. You could always climb into the car yourself and then call her, assuming it's big enough (fold seats down at first?).

Edited by NeylasMom

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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I think one thing that many people forget is that we need to make sure that we are ALWAYS taking our dogs to happy places for a while, especially as we are teaching them to get into the vehicle on their own.

 

I am NOT suggesting this applies to the OP - I have no idea. I am simply putting this out there, because I rarely see it mentioned.

 

When training a dog that is new to you to ride in the car/get in the car(does not matter the breed), we need to make sure to take them to fun places: pet stores, parks, etc. Even better if we arrange ahead of time to meet a friend with yummy treats or a playmate. The more happy people petting the dogs, the better!

 

Our second Greyhound was 9 when we adopted him. He had obviously not been in the vehicle much in his previous adoptive home, and if he had, I suspect it was to go to the vet. He shook like a leaf and panted heavily the whole time.

 

So we made a commitment to him to take him to good places. We had Naples, who was happy as heck to go anywhere with us (and still is!), and she rode beautifully wherever we went. We always took her, to help him relax with another dog, to whom he felt a strong connection. We took them to Petco, other pet stores, parks, and the like. We started taking him to meet and greets, where he found MANY people to sucker into giving him pets and treats (he LOVED M&Gs!). Before long, he started shaking from excitement rather than fear when we would take them places. He LOVED it, and was a fantastic representative of his breed!

 

My point is, if we make it pleasant for them, they are more likely to eventually learn to jump in on their own, and be happy to go places.

Sarah, the human, Henley, and Armani the Borzoi boys, and Brubeck the Deerhound.
Always in our hearts, Gunnar, Naples the Greyhounds, Cooper and Manero, the Borzoi, and King-kitty, at the Rainbow Bridge.

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That's a really good idea, Sighthounds.

 

With ours, we take a run at it and Brucie will jump. Our truck is a full size SUV so he's got jump high to get in. Our other guy Bumper had some spinal nerve damage so I'm lifting his 80 lb sack of potatoes in and out. Ironically, he was always kept in a top crate at his race kennels!

Doe's Bruciebaby Doe's Bumper

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Follow my Ironman journeys and life with dogs, cats and busy kids: A long road

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Guest Swifthounds

I think one thing that many people forget is that we need to make sure that we are ALWAYS taking our dogs to happy places for a while, especially as we are teaching them to get into the vehicle on their own.

 

I am NOT suggesting this applies to the OP - I have no idea. I am simply putting this out there, because I rarely see it mentioned.

 

When training a dog that is new to you to ride in the car/get in the car(does not matter the breed), we need to make sure to take them to fun places: pet stores, parks, etc. Even better if we arrange ahead of time to meet a friend with yummy treats or a playmate. The more happy people petting the dogs, the better!

 

Our second Greyhound was 9 when we adopted him. He had obviously not been in the vehicle much in his previous adoptive home, and if he had, I suspect it was to go to the vet. He shook like a leaf and panted heavily the whole time.

 

Good suggestion. When training anything new, I try to always make it as positive as possible.

 

My Trojan, who just turned 13, came to me at 12. He had been in a home for a number of years and then his owner became ill and back he went to an adoption group and was placed in foster care. I met with his foster family at the home of one of the adoption coordinators and the foster family departed first. I thought my heart would break when he wandered around the home looking for them. :( Out we headed to the car and I pop the rear hatch, get set to help this sad dog and WHOOSH!!!! - in he leaped all on his own! Suffice it to say, though he's a tad slowed by age, he knows car rides are a good thing...

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i personally don't like cesar milan's shows, but end up watching some of them anyway. there was an episode w/ a large dog and a suv and major fear of cars. see if you can find the episode, it will help. it was a matter of attitude, positive reinforcement and FOOD from what i remember. as posted before make the treats really worth while and be persisitant and positive. it will take some time and make sure that you have a non-skid carpet/bathmat for the pup to land on when it's finally in the car. also try backing it up to a curb so the jump will not be as high and hup, hup and away.

 

greys can jump just about anywhere if they want. i remember having the tail gate of our toyota pickup truck closed, but the door for the back of the cab open. emily was so excited she lept thru the small opening and landed on all of our camping gear. she was a hound ready to go anywhere at anytime!

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Guest jenznaz

Hi all, I'm brand new here. We adopted our first hound in November. She's such a great dog, and enjoys being in the car. We have a Mazda3 hatchback. The issue is, she will NOT jump in. She's randomly jumped in on her own once, but other than that fluke, I have to do a front end/back end boost combination, which is fine, however it'd be way easier and faster if she'd just jump in herself.

 

I've tried to encourage her to jump in herself, and she'll put her front feet up, but then will just try to "pull" herself up with her front feet, and try to step up with her hind feet. The car is too high for her to ever physically do this, she'll have to jump. After a bit of her trying to do her ineffective method, I'll boost her before she gets too anxious about it. Once in the car she's happy and fairly relaxed.

 

Any tips on teaching her to jump in by herself? I was thinking of sitting inside myself with a spoon of peanut butter (high value?), but I'm worried after her failing she'll shut down to the entire idea if she doesn't have a success, which I obviously don't want.

 

Thanks!

 

 

Hey! I also have a Mazda 3 hatchback and a new grey! He hasn't gotten it yet, and I'm still lifting his front and then his bum. Maybe we can keep each other updated on their progress!

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Guest gecko_foot

Hi all, I'm brand new here. We adopted our first hound in November. She's such a great dog, and enjoys being in the car. We have a Mazda3 hatchback. The issue is, she will NOT jump in. She's randomly jumped in on her own once, but other than that fluke, I have to do a front end/back end boost combination, which is fine, however it'd be way easier and faster if she'd just jump in herself.

 

I've tried to encourage her to jump in herself, and she'll put her front feet up, but then will just try to "pull" herself up with her front feet, and try to step up with her hind feet. The car is too high for her to ever physically do this, she'll have to jump. After a bit of her trying to do her ineffective method, I'll boost her before she gets too anxious about it. Once in the car she's happy and fairly relaxed.

 

Any tips on teaching her to jump in by herself? I was thinking of sitting inside myself with a spoon of peanut butter (high value?), but I'm worried after her failing she'll shut down to the entire idea if she doesn't have a success, which I obviously don't want.

 

Thanks!

 

I've been lifting Tumnus into the car for almost 3 months and only recently tried to teach him to jump into the car. I was initially resigned to trying because he has never shown any inclination to jump onto things, but after he jumped the 3 ft baby gate, the jig was up. I started him jumping over a low block wall before moving onto the car.

 

I have a hatchback SUV that is reasonably low to the ground. Since Tumnus is people (attention) oriented, I jumped into the car and tugged him gently until he put both front feet in the car. Then I continued to pull until he jumped in and praised him like crazy. It also helped that one of the other dogs decided that she wanted to be in the car too. After that first time, I really haven't had any trouble getting him into the car. I still have to get in there with him, but we're starting with baby steps and moving onward.

 

Hope this helps!

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Guest jaws4evr

Hi all

 

Thanks so much for all the input... and wouldn't you know it, that very same day I posted the question, out of the blue Madame Hound jumped in the back all by herself! She's been in and out of the car 4ish times since then, and jumped in without hesitation every time. I don't know why since I wasn't doing anything differently, but it seems the problem is solved!

 

For those who have the same problem though, ours definitely doesn't have a fear of the car... she happily and enthusiastically would put her front feet up, and try to wiggle her way inside.

 

Silly girl

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Congratulations! I also have the Mazda3 hatchback. Two of my boys jump in without reservation. My girl will jump in - sometimes. Depends on who else is already in and which way the wind is blowing, I think. My newest doesn't jump in yet and I have to put his front feet in and then lift his back end. By the time it's his turn to get in, it's a little crowded back there!

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