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1Moregrey

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    Ann

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    Female
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    Iowa
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    Behavior training
    Clicker training

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  1. At 6 weeks he is just at the beginning of his culture shock. He is most likely just now noticing the sound and sight that have been there since you brought him home. Think of it as being on auto pilot and suddenly having to take the wheel. The more time you can spend outside just listening and watching the better. Slowly get him used to your neighborhood if he spooks at a noise and you are in a safe place to get him to stop and listen/watch. My girl spooked at the sound of a nail gun that roofers were using on one of our walks. I stopped her from sprinting off we went back and I told her a story about the roofers why they were on the roof, the big noise is going to happen now, again and the like. She gets told about all noises if they are real or recorded (they get turned off and on). So more time, patience, and exposure. The more mater of fact you can be the better the less likely you will feed into his insecurities. Being told he is a good boy and ear, neck, back scratches are just as good as food. My first one would not eat away from home. She worked ear rubs and verbal praise. People would try to give her steak and all kinds of high value treats she would not even look at the food. So do not worry about that. If he is willing to go out daily do daily by being scared/spooked and then not going out you might be making him think it is a bigger deal if it happens every time. Each time you go out think he is going to be brave and not bothered by noise it is no big deal just something new to explore. Then your fear/anxiety will hopefully not be transferred to him. Hope this helps it just takes time as they are really just over grown puppies experiencing the big wide world for the first time. Except the fight or flight is fully developed.
  2. I started sleep startle training when I woke one night to my head in my dogs mouth. So now all my dogs since have muzzle on for several months while I randomly reach around and pet them with hands, feet, soft bristle of brooms on there toes. They get so used to it, muzzles only come off when I get the you again look as the only response. Good luck with safe practice and patience you can over come this.
  3. That is wonderful news and a very special celebration is in order.
  4. I feel for you. I have had similar experience in the neighborhood trails. People’s dogs come running up behind us barking while the owners are acting like it is our fault there dog is chasing us. My favorite OMG thing to hear is “it is ok my dog (that is chasing yours) is friendly”. LOL that is so not the issue. One reason I carry an extra leash with me for those extra friendly dogs. That way I can keep them from jumping all over my dog while there unresponsible owner comes to get them. I hope you find a time and or place where that is unlikely to happen. Thanks for letting me vent from the states too.
  5. I think you're spot on there -- when we're stuck at the door, he is very reactive to any little sound. I have no idea what to do about it, though! We're not in a huge building, but still, there's never going to be a time when there will be zero footsteps/doors closing/etc. I would spend time in the stairway and show/tell where the noise is coming from. My gh is just getting used to neighborhood sound there are roofers out now after the storms. I explain that the people on the roof are fixing it. I let her stand and watch from a comfortable distance. Now she is not scared of them. The air nailer sent her into a bolting panic when it went off behind her. We regained composure then I showed her where it was coming from and we watched for a while and moved closer and watched some more til it was no big thing. Now she just puts her ears up and looks but does not bolt. I have spent a lot of time on sounds telling her where/who makes then cat, garbage truck etc. If she hears something on tv or radio I say it is fake and turn the sound off and on. She no longer jumps up at new sounds or if the cat knocks something over. If I say it is the cat she just lays her head back down. If I say what was that she will go investigate. You could try just showing where the noises come from and talking about them. Might make them less scary and more normal. Good luck 😉
  6. Wonder if he hear things in the stairwell but can not figure out where the noise is coming from. Especially if there is an echo from a door shutting on another floor. Just a thought 😜
  7. I also had a positive result with a similar treatment. We ended up cycling her meds based on nail condition but keep her on Niacinamide and Snip Tips year round. We noticed a pattern the second year so started the meds back before her usual flare up and it seemed to ended her flare ups and she did not lose any more nails. I did some reading up on yeast sensitivity around the same time she was very lickie of her tummy and had some food issues. She did well on a salmon sensitive digestion food. Eventually stopped having issues for a few years before she passed last spring from cancer.
  8. You could build on this and just be gone when he comes back from a walk to get him used to it. Then incorporate leaving when he is home even if it is just to go outside to get the mail or water plants. When you come back just go about your business and not make it a big deal he will get get used to it soon enough. He might be nervous that his security blanket (you) is gone forever like he was from where you adopted him from. Build his confidence and routine and you will be fine. Kids of all kinds out grow this once they feel secure.
  9. What happens if when he comes back from a walk and you are not home?
  10. Sounds exactly like Journey’s experience, she had a few days of soft at the worst pudding poos when looking back was a flair up of worms/hatching then she would have ok poos. Thankfully she never had the bloody or truly liquid poos. She would have tummy grumbles/poos. Talked to the vet and ended up moving up her worming meds (just a few days) to match her tummy grumbles that seemed to help knock them down. The 28th will be her 1 year gotcha day. So we will be close to 18+ months before we could get two negative fecals. Maybe next year she can play in the yard. For now we just go on walks I am not letting her on the grass in the yard. I do not want to be fighting hookworms in the soil for years to come. (Probably over kill and paranoia but not gonna happen if I can help it.) I did find when she went off of her food due to a flair up a little buttermilk would entice her to eat and she never refused it. So she would get an ounce or two in the morning every three weeks or so. Hang in there, light is at the end of the tunnel
  11. Sounds like she is trying to see where she fits in and who is in charge between the two. If she is just being vocal or trying to crowd him out (think king of the hill game) they will work it out soon. If it is escalating or you fear for a fight for safety sake put turn out muzzles on to prevent any injuries. Something to consider is the personality of both dogs. If you have a two that each think they are the leader. If you respect the order meaning interact with whoever is the number one first in everything. You will not upset the order and can have a more peaceful pack. If you interact with the lower in status first you can create confusion between the two which can cause them to keep discussing (growling +) to figure it out. My two females were this way if they were interacted with in the wrong order they would have to figure out who really was in charge each time. If I reinforced the order things were peaceful. My next pair one of the original females was 6, and new male was 2. They got along fine except when they were playing in the yard. Female would knock the wind out of him anytime he passed her. She would run into his side so hard I could hear it 80 feet away. This went on for a few days but he learned. He was definitely low middle of the pack personality. If you can figure out what personality types you have then you can make adjustments. The adoption group may have someone who could observe them and offer help if you need it too. Best wishes
  12. Her last fecal she had larva leak bloom they said it was not a huge amount am thankful for that. It gives me hope I might be getting a good hold on them. Looking forward to more negative results back to back I hope. Thanks for sharing this I am not on Facebook so I appreciate the information.
  13. I have had good luck with buttermilk to entice eating and also to gain weight. Just 1-2 oz before breakfast followed by a meal.
  14. Congratulations on your new hound. He needs more time to adjust to a home and his new schedule. His whole world has changed and they tend to observe and soak it all in for a long time. Once he starts to get used to his new environment he will free up brain space for training and learning. In the mean time I would not even try to do a structured training where you would use treats. Instead I would use a long line or at least a six foot leash and have him on it with you holding onto it. Just go about your normal activity and have him follow you that way you can say his name and use the leash to guide him to you give lots of ear scratches/body rubs/treat if he will take it. Before he gets his meal you can have him stand nicely before he gets his meal. Just simple house manners. You will be surprised at how much he will pickup on with consistency. Then as he gets more settled you can do more structured training, lots of patience, persistence and just a few minutes a day. Greyhounds are sometimes not good at repetitive training and get bored fast or stubborn so keep it short less than four or five times in a row. The best is sometimes something like three repetitions two or three times a day. I wrote about my new dogs training in the introductions. I feel you we has some issues to overcome, she learned a lot without formal training just repetition in daily life. Training came later and in small doses more behavior shaping than treat training. Some greyhounds really get into clicker training once they figure out how to make it rain treats too. Best wishes it just takes some extra time for them to be comfortable and secure as pets in a home setting. They thrive in a constant highly scheduled environment too much free time can be overwhelming.
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