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Sileo: New Drug For Noise Anxiety


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A friend who has been a Greyhound person for about 20 years told me that she got a 'script medicine from her vet (also mine) today called Sileo. It came out just this week. It is supposed to reduce anxiety and fear associated with noise, such as fireworks and thunder storms.

 

It is a gel administered via a syringe between the gum and cheek of a dog. To quote from the URL link below:

 

"Sileo works by blocking norepinephrine, a brain chemical similar to adrenaline that pumps up anxiety. It comes in prefilled plastic syringes with a dial for setting a precise dose according to the dog's weight. The needleless syringe is placed between the dog's gum and lip. A little push ejects a small amount of gel that's absorbed by the tissue lining the dog's cheek, which limits how much circulates in the dog's body at a time while enabling the medicine to start working within 30 to 60 minutes. It works for two to three hours, said McFarland, who's used Sileo with good results on his Finnish Lapphund.

Each syringe costs $30, about two doses for an 80- to 100-pound dog or fours doses for a 40-pound dog."

 

http://www.nola.com/pets/index.ssf/2016/05/dog_noise_drug.html

 

It's expensive, though for those of us with just one dog it is affordable and would be worth it if indeed it does what it claims. My friend is going to try it today on one of her Greyhounds that is particularly afraid of thunder storms, which we are expecting. She'll let me know if it works.

 

I am interested not for T-storms, though Annie doesn't like them, but for July 4th! Last year was the first year in New York State it was legal for individuals to shoot off fireworks. Since most of my neighbors are law abiding, there was never an issue with fireworks until last year when it was legal. If I'm convinced it works and is safe, I will use it for Annie on July 4th. She was so bad last year I almost took her to the emergency vet.

 

 

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There was a piece about this on our local news a few weeks ago. I'm going to be interested to hear how it works for you.

 

If you can afford the doses, you may want to consider giving her a dose prior to the 4th, just to make sure she's not going to have an adverse reaction, and to see how long it needs to take effect, and how long it lasts.

Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

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Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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I'm reserved about this product. It contains a drug that is often used as a sed in the veterinary hospital. That particular drug comes with a host of side effects-cardiac and respiratory depression, I would like to see some more feedback-esp when in use with sighthounds.

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Guest MnMDogs

I was hoping this would be an option for Greg. He's getting worse and is terrified of even walking by the playground when any kids are playing. I'd love to hear any experiences.

Edited by MnMDogs
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I was hoping this would be an option for Greg. He's getting worse and is terrified of even walking by the playground when any kids are playing. I'd love to hear any experiences.

It's my understanding that this is a product to be used on occasion when needed-not to be used as a daily medication like trazadone, Xanax etc..
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It's my understanding that this is a product to be used on occasion when needed-not to be used as a daily medication like trazadone, Xanax etc..

Exactly. The effects supposedly last only about 2 hours, so on a heavy-duty firework night, it would take 2 doses.

 

The side affects are scary to read but it appears the incidents are few and far between and if the dog is healthy, the likelihood of a negative affect are very small. Everything we give our dogs -- or ourselves for that matter -- has the potential for side affects. Nonetheless, I will find out from my friend how her hound does on it.

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Guest MnMDogs

It's my understanding that this is a product to be used on occasion when needed-not to be used as a daily medication like trazadone, Xanax etc..

Xanax barely works anymore for our poor bud.

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It's my understanding that this is a product to be used on occasion when needed-not to be used as a daily medication like trazadone, Xanax etc..

Yes. I'm interested to hear more once people start using it. Another tool in the toolbox is always helpful, though it may not turn out to be the miracle cure they seem to be touting it as. I will add that for dogs who have severe thunderstorm or other noise anxiety, I would prefer using this even if the side effect is some sedation over nothing or other drugs that aren't effective enough. Sedation in and of itself isn't necessarily bad if the medication is also relieving the anxiety. When sedation is a problem is when it doesn't relieve the anxiety but prevents the dog from escaping or acting to display the anxiety so the owner believes the dog is okay, which is why Acepromazine can be so problematic.

 

Fwiw, sedation is also seen as a side effect in a lot of dogs who take Trazodone, but that one doesn't wear off as quickly. And yet, it's been a hugely helpful addition to the options for addressing anxiety in dogs.

 

Anyway, jury is out in my book, but I am hopeful Sileo will have its place in the treatment of anxiety.

Edited by NeylasMom

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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Fwiw, sedation is also seen as a side effect in a lot of dogs who take Trazodone, but that one doesn't wear off as quickly. And yet, it's been a hugely helpful addition to the options for addressing anxiety in dogs.

 

 

 

With my spook, I actually think this was what she needed. Her brain and senses were constantly working overtime - seing too much, hearing too much - overwhelming her ability to deal with normal life. The Trazadone helped slow things down for her and keep everything manageable for her brain.

Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

35764734494_93de5b5963_b.jpg

Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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Thank you for this information. Ryder is only anxious on our walks, but becomes quite the handful when we do. Any truck, loud van, bus, etc. I'm not sure this would be right for us for just a short 15 min stint outside, but this has made me curious about the potential out there.

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It's my understanding that this is a product to be used on occasion when needed-not to be used as a daily medication like trazadone, Xanax etc..

It's weird that dogs have to take Tradzone and Xanex every day. I take Ativan, Xanex's cousin, on pretty much as an as needed basis with my doctors OK I usually take one at night but boost it in the day only when 'm facing a stressful situation. If I took Trazadone every day I'd be a walking zombie. Odd dogs are different when it comes to anxiety meds as they are similar with anti-depressants like Prozac.

 

"People taking benzodiazepines for weeks or months may develop tolerance for and dependence on these drugs. Abuse and withdrawal reactions are also possible. For these reasons, the medications are generally prescribed for brief periods of time – days or weeks – and sometimes just for stressful situations or anxiety attacks. However, some patients may need long-term treatment."

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OH so excited to hear if this works for your friend. Ruby is afraid of everything, and her anxiety has always been out of control on those loud nighst. I dread summer because of the 4th of July.

Last night she heard the BBQ contract and expand, so spent the evening pacing up and down the hallway and spending time in her crate shaking. We have tried every med the vet could think of on her, with zero results.

I don't know if this med is an option for her due to her heart murmur, but I am anxiously awaiting the results.

Karen

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Pam, Xanax, Valium and Trazodone are all used situationally as they are in people. Typically if a dog needs medication all of the time, then you use an SSRI (Prozac is most common) or another long term anti-anxiety. However, Trazodone has been found to enhance the effects of Prozac so the 2 can be used well together. And there are some dogs who don't tolerate Prozac and other anxiety meds well for whom just taking a low dose of Trazodone daily may work. FYI, Trazodone is not a benzo, it regulates serotonin uptake. It is also used as a sleep medication and I have seen dogs made very sedate by it, so it's definitely something you have to evaluate. Often those types of side effects will improve after a few days though, which is not a benefit you get if you take it situationally.

Edited by NeylasMom

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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I'll post when I hear news about its use. My friend got it for thunder storms for one of her Greys but there's not always enough time to administer something to avoid the fear of a T-storm. I am going to try it for fireworks on July 4th.

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Pam, Xanax, Valium and Trazodone are all used situationally as they are in people. Typically if a dog needs medication all of the time, then you use an SSRI (Prozac is most common) or another long term anti-anxiety. However, Trazodone has been found to enhance the effects of Prozac so the 2 can be used well together. And there are some dogs who don't tolerate Prozac and other anxiety meds well for whom just taking a low dose of Trazodone daily may work. FYI, Trazodone is not a benzo, it regulates serotonin uptake. It is also used as a sleep medication and I have seen dogs made very sedate by it, so it's definitely something you have to evaluate. Often those types of side effects will improve after a few days though, which is not a benefit you get if you take it situationally.

Well, you told me. :blush.

 

My bad as I addressed the Trozadone and Xanex not always being used daily in humans but forgot to make a notation about my mentioning Xanex (which is a benzo) not working for M & M Dogs anymore. That happened to me after 10 years on an SSRI. Every enhancer (Wellbutin, Abilify) they've used on me has overloaded me to dangerous points. One of my doctors is doing a research study on overamplifcation. Too bad our dogs can't talk and share their stories.

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I'm a little skeptical of Sileo. Knowing how the active ingredient is used as an injectable sedative, and seeing the effect of even low doses, I have a hard time seeing how it would reduce anxiety without having a sedating effect.

Jennifer &

Willow (Wilma Waggle), Wiki (Wiki Hard Ten), Carter (Let's Get It On),

Ollie (whippet), Gracie (whippet x), & Terra (whippet) + Just Saying + Just Alice

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I'm a little skeptical of Sileo. Knowing how the active ingredient is used as an injectable sedative, and seeing the effect of even low doses, I have a hard time seeing how it would reduce anxiety without having a sedating effect.

I'm on the same page with your concerns.
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I'm a little skeptical of Sileo. Knowing how the active ingredient is used as an injectable sedative, and seeing the effect of even low doses, I have a hard time seeing how it would reduce anxiety without having a sedating effect.

 

Just to clarify: Sileo isn't injected, if indeed you meant injected like a needle in a muscle. It comes in a syringe filled with the gel which is put between the cheek and gum and squeezed into that area and is then absorbed into the tissue.

 

I plan on having it on hand for July 4th but am waiting to see how it affects other Greyhounds before using it.

Edited by Feisty49
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Just to clarify: Sileo isn't injected, if indeed you meant injected like a needle in a muscle. It comes in a syringe filled with the gel which is put between the cheek and gum and squeezed into that area and is then absorbed into the tissue.

 

I plan on having it on hand for July 4th but am waiting to see how it affects other Greyhounds before using it.

But this is--this is the product both Jennifer and I are referring too.....

https://www.zoetisus.com/products/dogs/dexdomitor-_dexmedetomidine_.aspx

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I'm a little skeptical of Sileo. Knowing how the active ingredient is used as an injectable sedative, and seeing the effect of even low doses, I have a hard time seeing how it would reduce anxiety without having a sedating effect.

Can you expand on why the possibility of sedation concerns you? From your wording it doesn't sound like your concern is that the drug is only sedating and giving the appearance of relieving anxiety as a result, but that it would sedate on top of relieving anxiety. Is there a health concern? I have no doubt clients are going to start asking me about Sileo soon so it would be good to have some additional medical perspective.

 

Well, you told me. :blush.

 

 

I don't understand the defensiveness. I was just sharing what I know about how these drugs are used thinking it would be helpful or informative to you or others. Edited by NeylasMom

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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But this is--this is the product both Jennifer and I are referring too.....

https://www.zoetisus.com/products/dogs/dexdomitor-_dexmedetomidine_.aspx

 

This isn't the product about which I've been posting. Well, it is in that it has the same chemicals. I'm not a chemist or anything medical, but if you go to the link at the bottom of this post, it explains what it is and how it's administered. The paragraphs immediately below are copied and pasted from the site. As the first one states, it's administered in such a way (orally) that it limits the amount of drug entering the dog's body, thus not acting as a sedative.

 

Is it totally safe for any dog, especially Greyhounds? ::shrug:: Is anything safe for everything living? No. I'm not pushing its use. I just tossed it out here so people would know there is another product that *may* alleviate short-term anxiety related to noise, such as fireworks.

 

"SILEO is an oromucosal gel formulation of dexmedetomidine, a highly selective alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist that blocks norepinephrine release, a chemical in the brain that is involved with the development of fear and anxiety. SILEO is administered via oral transmucosal absorption, limiting the amount of dexmedetomidine available in the body at any given time after administration and thereby providing a calming effect without sedating. This allows dogs with noise aversion to remain calm yet fully functional. In addition, SILEO has a rapid speed of onset that can be tailored to the timing and duration of noise events. It works on its own without any other treatments or training.

 

"Veterinarians prescribe SILEO in a 3mL high-density polyethylene syringe, equipped with a dosing ring and end cap and packaged in a cardboard box. The dosage is 125 mcg/m2. It is administered by placing the gel between the dog’s cheek and gum and allowing for oral transmucosal absorption. In a usability study, over 90 percent of pet owners assessed the usability of the syringe to be “easy” or “very easy” to eject the correct volume of gel.

 

"SILEO typically takes effect within 30–60 minutes after application. The first dose can be given as soon as the dog shows signs of anxiety and fear, or approximately 30–60 minutes before a known anxiety- or fear-causing noise stimulus, such as fireworks. Each dose will last between two to three hours. SILEO can be re-dosed as needed every two hours, up to five times during each noise event. The pre-filled applicator has between one and 12 doses, depending on the size of the dog.

 

"SILEO has been demonstrated to be safe and effective in two randomized, double-blinded clinical field studies. SILEO had a good or excellent effect in 75 percent of the dogs which was significantly different from the placebo at p<0.0001. Adverse reaction rate to SILEO was low, and all reactions were mild."

http://news.zoetis.com/press-release/companion-animals/zoetis-announces-launch-sileo-treatment-noise-aversion-dogs

Edited by Feisty49
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It may be a fantastic option for some pets owners--but, im sure you can see why we are apprehensive. I have used dexdomitor many times with surgical patients. If a heavy enough dosage is used it can substitute for general anesthesia. There is a reversal drug for the injection if the patient gets I to trouble -also, to be given post surgery.

I'll watch this new product from the sidelines for now and will certainly post if I here anything good or bad about it.

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Can you expand on why the possibility of sedation concerns you? From your wording it doesn't sound like your concern is that the drug is only sedating and giving the appearance of relieving anxiety as a result, but that it would sedate on top of relieving anxiety. Is there a health concern?

 

The drug company claims that it is non-sedating. As an alpha-2 agonist (like clonidine), it probably does have some anti-anxiety properties, so it would be better than sedating with something like ace. I've just seen dexmedetomidine used as an injectable, and even when used as a preanesthetic medication at just a small fraction of the label dose, it can knock some dogs out. Maybe the oral route limits absorption enough that it really is non-sedating. I'm going to wait and see what kind of responses other vets and owners get before considering carrying it. But then, I'm like this with just about any new product.

Jennifer &

Willow (Wilma Waggle), Wiki (Wiki Hard Ten), Carter (Let's Get It On),

Ollie (whippet), Gracie (whippet x), & Terra (whippet) + Just Saying + Just Alice

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