Jump to content

Training...good Books/methods?


tra708
 Share

Recommended Posts

So, I have a new greyhound here, Connie. She is a foster for now. :D She is very eager to please, food motivated, and intelligent. She is already a very good girl. I would like to start training her on basic commands. I don't have much experience with dog training; the greys I've had just weren't into it, and I didn't pursue it.

 

Can I just pick up any good dog training book and use traditional training methods? How would a retired racer be different than training a young puppy? I'd love some suggestions on which books you guys think stand out of the pack (haha) in terms of how well they teach you to train your dog.

Connie is 3yrs old and I've had her for 10 days, and she is very attached and responsive to me.

Thanks!

2rqyqhd.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Other End of the Leash is great. It's by Patricia McConnell. It's not really a training book, but she explains a lot of what we do wrong during the training process. I just found this http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B008Z1XYVS/ref=mp_s_a_1_13?qid=1410707978&sr=8-13&pi=AC_SX110_SY165_QL70 it's also by McConnell.

I've definitely found that greyhounds do best with positive reinforcement training. I don't believe in pack theory and I don't like Caesar Milan. I've done clicker training with my dogs and they enjoy it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you want a book that will actually walk you through how to teach basic cues, I have 2 favorites. I highly recommend reading both, but if youre only going to get one, get The Power of Positive Training by Pat Miller.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/0470241845/ref=cm_sw_r_an_am_ap_am_us?ie=UTF8

 

If you can add a second get Jolanta Benal's book (she's quite funny so its an amusing quick read on top of being very informative).

http://www.amazon.com/dp/0312678223/ref=cm_sw_r_an_am_ap_am_us?ie=UTF8

 

I'm not sure if by "traditional" methods you mean old school methods that are based primarily on punishment. If so, definitely don't use those. :P Reward based training is the way to go for these guys, specifically food rewards when you're starting out.

Edited by NeylasMom

gallery_12662_3351_862.jpg

Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am guessing you want an actual dog training (ie. commands) book rather than a dog behaviour book? If so, you may also want to check out some websites/youtube channels on the internet from reputable trainers. I find videos help me to visualize things better than just reading. I am a big fan of the clicker training for teaching behaviours. I am even training my rabbits to do agility with it right now.

 

As someone already mentioned, you need patience to teach a greyhound. Don't give up, and don't get frustrated, just take things slowly. It took me a month to teach Teague something that my other dogs learned in a few days, but now things are much quicker.

Edited by RedHead
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are looking for videos, I like Kikopup. She's got a YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-qnqaajTk6bfs3UZuue6IQ Covers the basics, and then a lot of fancy tricks. I would also recommend finding a good, positive-reinforcement based trainer in your area to work with. Doing things in person can make a lot go smoother, and, personally, I find dog training fun.

77f6598d-2.jpg

My blog about helping Katie learn to be a more normal dog: http://katies-journey-philospher77.blogspot.com/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All great suggestions, thank you! Neyla's Mom....no I wasn't planning on punishment methods. :lol Just positive stuff.

Every time I try to do something, the other dogs butt in because they see the treats. Do you train one dog at a time, in a different room?

 

By the way, recently I read on here about a dog who wouldn't jump into the car. Well, that's the problem with her I'm having, too.

She really does not want to jump into the back (a big, flat area) of my hatchback. I hope I can solve that problem...I can lift her into

the car, but I always think I'm hurting her. :dunno

2rqyqhd.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm in almost the exact same boat as you in terms of having my first greyhound (Juno) for a little over a week now. Our little girl is also really intelligent and today, it took us three tries and she mastered "sit" which I've heard is difficult for some greyhounds to achieve. I don't have a lot of experience with dog training, but I have trained wild horses before so I kind of transferred some of my own methods. It's just simple positive reinforcement and having really exact timing when giving rewards.

 

I kinda just led Juno to her crate where she usually sits before laying down and had a treat in hand to reward the moment. She caught on out of the crate pretty quickly, though we had a long moment of silent eye contact before she did it lol.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As others have said positive methods, patience and repetition are the keys. I would suggest you also keep sessions short as greys do seem to have short attention spans ;)

 

It can help sometimes to train with another dog who already knows the commands as they can learn by imitation , this certainly worked for my boy Johnny who was helped to learn "sit" by my friend's Lurcher showing him the ropes.

<p>"One day I hope to be the person my dog thinks I am"Sadi's Pet Pages Sadi's Greyhound Data PageMulder1/9/95-21/3/04 Scully1/9/95-16/2/05Sadi 7/4/99 - 23/6/13 CroftviewRGT

Link to comment
Share on other sites

if you are a first time dog owner may i suggest this: http://www.amazon.com/The-Ultimate-Puppy-Toolkit-well-adjusted/dp/0973159103/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1411000109&sr=8-2&keywords=the+complete+puppy+guide+by+premier

 

even though your dog is NOT a puppy, this guide is well written, hits basic topics and is very very positive. i received it as a present when felix came home at 7 weeks- and he was my 7th dog! i loved it, basic, to the point and i have passed it on to numerous dog owners, both new and experienced. they all liked it.

 

remember your dog is trained to a mission, all the little every day things are mentioned here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All great suggestions, thank you! Neyla's Mom....no I wasn't planning on punishment methods. :lol Just positive stuff.

Every time I try to do something, the other dogs butt in because they see the treats. Do you train one dog at a time, in a different room?

 

By the way, recently I read on here about a dog who wouldn't jump into the car. Well, that's the problem with her I'm having, too.

She really does not want to jump into the back (a big, flat area) of my hatchback. I hope I can solve that problem...I can lift her into

the car, but I always think I'm hurting her. :dunno

 

If she's food motivated, try throwing a delicious treat in and see if she'll go for it. My old boy would always get into the car when we were leaving the house, but almost never agree to get back in the car when we were returning home. So, I'd put his front legs up and hoist his butt in. He was physically capable of doing it, but he was also stubborn and didn't want the fun to end :lol

 

A thought - you have other dogs, right? Are they loaded up before her? Maybe try getting her in first, then load the other dogs. Some pups are reticent to jump in a hatchback with other dogs because they don't want to risk getting told off by getting in the other dogs' space.


Meredith with Heyokha (HUS Me Teddy) and Crow (Mike Milbury). Missing Turbo (Sendahl Boss), Pancho, JoJo, and "Fat Stacks" Juana, the psycho kitty. Canku wakan kin manipi.

"Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." - Voltaire

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All great suggestions, thank you! Neyla's Mom....no I wasn't planning on punishment methods. :lol Just positive stuff.

Every time I try to do something, the other dogs butt in because they see the treats. Do you train one dog at a time, in a different room?

Yes, I always put the dogs who I'm not working with behind a baby gate in another room, sometimes with a bully stick or kong so they don't bark their fool heads off waiting their turns. :lol

 

Alternatively, once you're far enough along in your training, this can be an excellent way to practice stays with the dogs you aren't working with. Just put them in down stays far enough away from the "action" that your other dog isn't on top of them, but so you can easily toss a treat now and then to reward and have them stay while you work the other dog. Make sure not to push it too long though and give them breaks periodically.

gallery_12662_3351_862.jpg

Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for all advice!! Connie now knows her name, and "lie down". So, that's cool.

Still no jumping in the car or on the couch/bed, even using food. I do want her to learn how to jump onto the bed....because the

hounds have their very own "people" bed in one bedroom, which makes more room in my bedroom!

Jackie and Lola slept on that bed together all the time; they preferred that to a dog bed on the floor. :)

2rqyqhd.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest missecho

Positive reinforcement training--clicker training only! Anything else is very counter productive with greyhounds--they are super independent and don't like to be told what to do.

 

Also the treats have to be super high value treats--my hound spits out anything except baked chicken, beef, or cheese. Seriously.

This took me a couple of weeks to figure out. Another hint: during walks your grey may "statute", or stand without moving. I have learned that she is indicating to me that she wants to go in a different direction. She will indicate which direction through her body language, perhaps by pointing her nose in the direction in which she wants to walk. At these times a Ceasar Milan type training would indicate that you muscle up and demand that the hound goes in the direction you want. What works better for hounds: waiting them out. Stand there longer than they do. When they acquiesce to go your way, act excited and pleased. If you have some chicken, reward them. Your training will go much easier if you aren't trying to boss your dog around.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest normaandburrell

I really agree with missecho. Both my greys would indicate the way they wanted to go by looking in that direction, and then at me. My only issue was that sometimes they would stop in the middle of the road and refuse to move. That's when a pocket full of treats and a very excited "let's go!" would come in handy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...