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Possible Overheating


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I just took the dogs to the park just to let them wander around and potty since it's too hot to walk. I didn't figure any of the dogs would run, but Zuri did a few laps before I could stop him. He was panting quite heavily in the car, and hesitated jumping in, but he did get in on his own. When we got back upstairs to my condo his eyes looked a bit odd (red and a bit squinty) and he felt really hot. He was still walking around, but slowly when I called him (normally he runs toward me) so I put him in the shower and started spraying him down with cold water.

 

I took his temp after I started that and it was at 105. I called my vet immediately as I kept hosing him down. She told me to stop at 103.5 so he wouldn't get too cold (which I had heard) and I did. At this point, he's out of the shower, his temp is right at 101 and he's alert and actually playing with toys. SO...my question is, does the fact that he's alert mean that we're out of the woods or should I still get him in for bloodwork? I'm supposed to leave the house in about 2 hrs so I can watch him for at least that long, and stay home or take him in if I'm not sure. But I'm taking it as a good sign that he's got a normal temp and is acting normal at this point.

 

Please advise. I followed the whole post recently about the girl who got out and barely made it through (I feel horrible, but her name is slipping my mind) so I know how dangerous this can be, but again, he seems okay now.

 

Thanks in advance to anyone who can help.

Jen

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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I asked her about the possibilities while on the phone because I figured there was no harm in taking him in for bloodwork right now either way. She said if he was bouncing around and acting normal, I probably shouldn't worry. She also said early on the bloodwork tends to come back normal so it's unlikely we'd see anything right away if I did bring him in.

 

But that makes me nervous. If there's already been damage and we're just waiting hours for it to happen, how will I know? Will he physically go downhill again. She mentioned vomiting and bloody diarrhea as signs.

 

I know I'm rambling. I honestly think he's okay, but I don't know. Does anyone know how quickly organ damage can occur? It was about 10 minutes from when we left the dog park to get to the car, get in and get home. I put him in the shower almost immediately. There were probably another 5 minutes or so post-running that we stood around in the park and they drank water because at that point I didn't realize we had a potential problem.

gallery_12662_3351_862.jpg

Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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Guest KennelMom
Heat Stroke This article says to seek vet treatment if the dog reached 105 degrees, once the dog has cooled down to 103 or so. You and your vet are in the best position to make the decision if he needs immediate supportive care or if he's ok without it.
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Guest smarthound

I pulled this off the Drs Foster and Smith website. I'd probably make a trip to the vet but I'm a worrier by nature.

 

Hope this info helps.

What should I do if my dog gets heatstroke?

Remove the dog from the hot area immediately. Prior to taking him to your veterinarian, lower his temperature by wetting him thoroughly with cool water (for very small dogs, use lukewarm water), then increase air movement around him with a fan. Be careful, however, as using very cold water can actually be counterproductive. CAUTION: Cooling too quickly and especially allowing his body temperature to become too low can cause other life-threatening medical conditions. The rectal temperature should be checked every 5 minutes. Once the body temperature is 103ºF, the cooling measures should be stopped and the dog should be dried thoroughly and covered so he does not continue to lose heat. Even if the dog appears to be recovering, take him to your veterinarian as soon as possible, he should still be examined since he may be dehydrated or have other complications.

 

Allow free access to water if the dog can drink on his own. Do not try to force-feed cold water; the dog may inhale it and could choke.

 

The full article is here: http://www.drsfostersmith.com/pic/article....06&aid=1375

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He is actually prancing around squeaking happily on his favorite cuz toy right now. Trying to retake his temp but my thermometer must have gotten some water in it so it's being a little finicky. He no longer feels hot though.

 

Totally paranoid, but I did see his leg muscle twitching when he was lying down. Just a few times. Any chance that means anything (I know, TOTALLY paranoid)?

 

Thanks to those of you who have responded already.

 

 

gallery_12662_3351_862.jpg

Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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Okay, I called my vet's office back and asked to speak to the emergency vet who fills in there sometimes, and who I knew was in the office. She said that dogs that have gotten heat stroke do not recover so Zuri probably just suffered a "heat episode". I'm really glad I called back though as she advised me not to let him have any activity tonight, and not to walk him at all outside this weekend as he may be more prone to a heat related event as a result.

 

Anyway, since I am a total worrywart, I did ask a friend if he could stay with her while I go out tonight (yes, momma really wants to go on that 2nd date since it's the first guy she's dated in 2 years!) just so someone is keeping an eye on him and I am printing a map to the nearest vet hospital for her as I type!

 

Thanks again everyone. I think we're okay here. There's definitely something to be said for being aware of the warning signs of heat stroke and what to do (and also how to not be an idiot and take your dogs to the park in the first place).

 

Jen

gallery_12662_3351_862.jpg

Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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Hope everything is okay, and you are a fantastic mommy. Hope your date goes well too!

Aero: http://www.greyhound-data.com/d?d=kees+uncatchable; our bridge angel (1/04/02-8/2/07) Snickers; our bridge angel (1/04/02-2/29/08) Cricket; Kanga Roo: oops girl 5/26/07; Doctor Thunder http://www.greyhound-data.com/d?z=P_31Oj&a...&birthland=
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Greys can be pretty intense when they exercise, and they have certain characteristics that allow them to shed heat more quickly than other dogs. Sometimes these don't keep up with the rate of production.

 

As with heat stroke in humans, a dog that is in danger of its life will probably not be standing upright. Most likely they will collapse and their state of consciousness will be altered. The crash cooling (not TOO "crash-y") is the best thing for them. With the reverse proposition- normal temperature dog, warm or hot water- collapse is possible, presumably from a rapid drop in blood pressure. Cool water- with emphasis on the legs, abdomen, and feet (plug up the drain)- will help reduce body temperature quickly. Spraying the underside of the body- where the fur is the thinnest- will remove heat quickly, as will getting the legs and feet which are rich with blood vessels.

 

Given how many 110F+ days we have out here, I've given this a lot of thought. In a true heat emergency, I'd be willing to bring in at least some ice or packs of frozen vegetables to reduce body temperature along with a cool shower. Part of this is that the "cold" water here in Phoenix comes out lukewarm for 2-3 months out of the year.

 

Good luck with your pup. It sounds like your dog will be just fine!

Coco (Maze Cocodrillo)

Minerva (Kid's Snipper)

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:colgate:colgate So how was the date? Glad your dog did not get any worse & is getting back to himself!!! I've cancelled a few events thinking there was something wrong with the pups when they turned out to be just fine. We all worry too much :rolleyes: Edited by zimsmom
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:colgate:colgate So how was the date? Glad your dog did not get any worse & is getting back to himself!!! I've cancelled a few events thinking there was something wrong with the pups when they turned out to be just fine. We all worry too much :rolleyes:

 

Been there, done that... a dive trip to Turks and Caicos...

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Marc and Myun plus Starbuck (the cat)
Pinky my AWOL girl, wherever you are, I miss you.
Angels Honey (6/30/99-11/3/11) Nadia (5/11/99-6/4/12) Kara (6/5/99-7/17/12) Cleo (4/13/2000-4/19/2014)

Antnee (12/1/2002=2/20/17)

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Guest Oh_Greyt

Didn't see this thread until this morning... How is Zuri doing? At least you acted immediately and were able to get his temp down before it got too high (I've had a dog go to 108 - and it wasn't pretty). If you get a chance, give us a quick update.

 

And how did the date go? ;)

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Thanks for all of your concern and words of encouragement. Zuri is totally fine, thank goodness. He spent the evening uneventfully at my friend's house and has been lounging around and playing periodically as usual today. He even got to go for his blood typing and trial run to be a blood donor and got hugged on a table (Zuri's report - spooning is cool) and eat lots of grain-filled treats (Zuri's report - cheetos are cool ;) ).

 

I of course feel incredibly awful/stupid that this happened - I freaking posted the links to the heat stroke websites on my group's adopter listserve so other people could be aware of the dangers after following Penny's thread. And the whole reason I took them there was because I knew it was too hot to walk them and I wanted them to have some stimulation before I had to leave the house again. I figured the car ride to the park and back, and all the great smells in the park would help with that and I didn't plan to let them run. Zuri literally only did some playful prancing back and forth trying to get the girls to chase him (which they were smart enough to ignore) and maybe one faster paced lap. Lesson learned on how truly quickly things can happen. :withstupid

 

FYI, while it is hot as heck here, it was "only" 90 degrees. I say only because I know some of you live where temps are even higher than that so please learn from my mistake and keep your pups inside (and on leash when you have to go outside) when it's this hot out.

 

Oh, but the date was really great. I have another one tomorrow. :yay:colgate We're spending the afternoon walking around the mall (in DC) and visiting art museums. Fingers crossed that I don't end up with heat stroke! :P

 

Thanks again everyone. You always hope you won't be the one posting for help in this section, but it's really great to know people are available to help if you do need it.

 

Jen

Edited by NeylasMom

gallery_12662_3351_862.jpg

Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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Guest minzenon

If greys are going out in even mild heat they need to be well stocked with electrolytes before they leave home plus have something like a beta K tablet to slow the loss of fluids.

As greys have no fat storage they have no water storage so any sort of running or playing(even in a backyard) can actually be fatal.

You can get a lot of stuff from this place - they even have a section dedicated to heat relieving products

http://www.vetproductsdirect.com.au/usacad...ormance&Bc=

 

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