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Osteosarcoma Vaccine


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Saw this on the Greyt Expectations Forum this morning. Very interesting.

 

Dr. Nicola Mason Bone Cancer Vaccine update It is now over 16 months since the first dog diagnosed with spontaneous osteosarcoma received an experimental bone cancer vaccine at the University of Pennsylvanias School of Veterinary Medicine. The vaccine is being administered to pet dogs that have been diagnosed with osteosarcoma, an aggressive tumor that affects the long bones of large and giant breed dogs. With current standard of care, that consists of amputation and follow up chemotherapy, median survival times are between 200 and 300 days. The aim of the vaccine, given to dogs after amputation and chemotherapy, is to prevent metastatic disease and prolong overall survival. Of the first 5 dogs vaccinated in this clinical trial, 4 of the dogs are still alive and have survived between 500 and 590 days; three of these dogs are tumor free. Other dogs have been vaccinated more recently so long term survival data for these dogs is not yet available. These results are really very exciting Dr. Nicola Mason, the lead investigator on the trial explains. They suggest that the vaccine is able to stimulate an effective anti-tumor immune response that is able to kill microscopic metastatic cells and prevent tumor recurrence in these dogs. Importantly, the vaccine appears to be safe. Only low-grade toxicities consisting of a mild fever and occasionally one episode of vomiting the same day as vaccination have been reported. There have been no long or short-term complications observed with the vaccine. The results are highly promising and a larger phase II clinical trial is now being planned at Penn and at collaborating sites including Colorado State University and the University of Florida. If you would like to learn more about the clinical trial and are interested in enrolling your patient or your own dog, please contact Dr. Nicola Mason, BVetMed, PhD, DACVIM at 215 898 3996 or by e-mail at nmason@vet.upenn.edu.

 

Mom to Melly and Dani

Greyhound Bridge Angels - Jessie, Brittne, Buddy,

Red, Chica, Ford and Dodge.

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University of Florida is where Dee had her eye surgery.

BUDDY, DEE, PRINCESS
ANGELS: SUSIE (BANDIT SUE) 3/26/1991-5/13/2006, TIPPER (MPS KRISTINA) 7/23/1999-2/4/2008, LADYBUG (BB'S LADYBUG) 5/19/2005-7/9/2008,
HAPPY 12/2000-10/9/2013, RICHY (DON L RICHY RICH) 11/5/2002-5/17/2015, DARREN 9/24/2005-3/2/2017, TUCKER (AWESOME ABILITY) 12/29/2004-12/4/2017,
BUG (BB'S DANCING BUG) 5/19/2005-11/17/2018

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This would be incredible if the data continues to support potential longer-term survival. Tks for posting this!

Kyle with Stewie ('Super C Ledoux, Super C Sampson x Sing It Blondie) and forever missing my three angels, Jack ('Roy Jack', Greys Flambeau x Miss Cobblepot) and Charlie ('CTR Midas Touch', Leo's Midas x Hallo Argentina) and Shelby ('Shari's Hooty', Flying Viper x Shari Carusi) running free across the bridge.

Gus an coinnich sinn a'rithist my boys and little girl.

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Guest fastcasper

Thank you for the info. Casper just finished his 6th round of carboplatin, so maybe he could be in the study. I will contact Dr. Mason! This could be very exciting news for the canine world!

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Guest fastcasper

Dr. Mason emailed me back. Unfortunately Casper is not a candidate for the study because he has had 6 rounds of chemo and for the study they require only 4 rounds. It was worth contacting her.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I posted this to the osteosarcoma thread earlier, but it seems relevant here so I thought I'd share it, in case it's of help to anyone:

 

I just received a reply from Dr. Mason regarding the possibility of treating Lana with the vaccine Dr. Mason is developing. Unfortunately it doesn't seem to be an option for Lana. Dr. Mason writes, "We have only treated 3 dogs with visible mets at the time of potential vaccination (ie - after amputation and carboplatin) and these dogs have continued to progress rapidly. For visible large metastatic disease I would be more likely to try palladia rather than immune therapy"

 

Lana had one lung met at the time I contacted Dr. Mason.

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