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Walliered

Hookworms In Yard?

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My dog appears to have hookworms about every month. He is on Heartguard Plus and I think that knocks them down, but I need to know what I can put in the yard (grass) to kill them. I pick up after him, but there is always a residue left in the grass. The computer is no help for anything that will kill the eggs or larva.

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Bleach. If your dog is being reinfected monthly, you need to treat your dog or treating the yard is useless. Hooks are really a bear to treat. I tried Panacur twice from our Vet and one round of Drontal, with no avail from the little bastiages.

 

You really need to worm the heck out of a dog to get rid of hookworms. Drontal Plus several times in a row should get rid of them. I treated Danger with Drontal Plus for three days in a row, waited a week, repeated three days again with the Drontal Plus, waited two weeks and treated again for three days with Drontal Plus. That finally got rid of them.

 

I got the Drontal Plus from an AU site, much cheaper than the Vet and no 'script needed.


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Guest Swifthounds

Heartgard Plus is going to be more of a hinderance than a help in ridding yourself of an active hookworm infection. The amount of wormer in it is really supposed to "control" but never "treat" an infestation. There's evidence that exposing intestinal worms to a non-fatal dose of wormer on a regular basis assists in breeding wormer resistant worms. You'd be better off going with a straight heartworm med and dosing a correct treatment dose of pyrantel once or twice a year. Even at that, it's pyrantel, which does nothing for hookworms.

 

Get a spray bottle and spray bleach or a bleach and water solution where the dog has pottied. Wash dog bedding in hot water. Use a wormed designed to treat hooks and dose it for 3 days, wait a week or two and dose again. You'll probably need at least 3 rounds. You can get it from your vet for $$$ or purchase it yourself from a farm supply store and adjust the dose.

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Even at that, it's pyrantel, which does nothing for hookworms.

 

Pyrantel pamoate is a standard, effective treatment for hookworms.

 

The amount in a monthly heartworm med won't get rid of an existing infestation, though -- you need a couple rounds of higher dose for that. Your vet can give you some Nemex-2 or Strongid-T -- both cheap, well tolerated, and effective.

 

BUT how do you know your dog has hookworms every month? Are you doing repeat fecals? Hookworms aren't visible in the stool. If you're seeing white spaghetti, it's probably roundworms (which Nemex/Strongid treat). If you're seeing white ribbons (flat), it's tapeworms, which need praziquantel.


Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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Guest Swifthounds

I should clarify. Pyrantel can be effective in killing adult hookworms, if used in a sufficient dose (ie not what's in the heartgard - it's a nice marketing ploy though). What it doesn't kill are eggs, which is where the real issue lies with hookworms and hookworm re-infestation. I've used pyrantel for around 20 years now in dogs and horses and never had it be effective on curing a hookworm infestation. Assuming you know it is, in fact, hookworms and not rounds, whips, or tapes, I would begin with the most appropriate and likely effective wormer possible. Pyrantel and others have a high safety margin, but that doesn't mean that using a slew of wormers in succession is without risk.

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Guest Energy11

No matter, it couldn't hurt to bleach the yard, just in case.

 

When I worked at the vet in Florida, we used a 50/50 solution of bleach and water in one of those yard sprayers hooked to a hose. We used to disinfect both runs and the inside concrete ones as well.

 

Bleach is cheap, and so are those sprayers. It couldn't hurt to be SURE you don't have any parasites in the ground.

 

Good Luck!

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I should clarify. Pyrantel can be effective in killing adult hookworms, if used in a sufficient dose (ie not what's in the heartgard - it's a nice marketing ploy though). What it doesn't kill are eggs, which is where the real issue lies with hookworms and hookworm re-infestation.

 

Nothing kills the eggs/cysts in the dog. That's why you have to re-treat at a couple weeks' intervals -- even with fenbendazole (Panacur).

 

If a dog is verified to have hooks/rounds only, pyrantel is safe, effective, and cheap :) .


Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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Guest Swifthounds

Nothing kills the eggs/cysts in the dog. That's why you have to re-treat at a couple weeks' intervals -- even with fenbendazole (Panacur).

 

Hence, the bleach.

 

If a dog is verified to have hooks/rounds only, pyrantel is safe, effective, and cheap :) .

 

Sometimes, sometimes not (effective on hooks), though almost always cheap and safe. If I were going to try to knock out hookworms with pyrantel, I certainly wouldn't give lower doses of pyrantel monthly before hand. There's good reason for rotating wormers.

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Not been my experience -- pyrantel has always worked just fine on hooks and rounds, have yet to hear of a resistance case when the product is properly used :) .


Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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Guest BooBooMama

This is what I am doing for Houdini:

Start with Panacur C- once a day for three days in a row. Repeat every three weeks until you have done three 'rounds'. (Some people say that if the level of infection is high dose for 5 days in a row.) Wait two weeks after last treatment then recheck stools. If negative, wait three weeks and test again (unless of course you see symptoms.) If fecal test is positive or symptoms come back then repeat treatment program but try Drontal Plus for the second series. This should cover hookworm, roundworm, tapeworm and whipworm.

 

Cover furniture and car seats (anywhere dog sits) with throws. Wash bedding, throws etc. every few days with hot water. If you have a dog run that has cement, stone etc. - wash with bleach. After each potty walk etc. wipe the anal and back of tail area with baby wipes to remove any larvae, etc. (That way they do not re-infect themselves when they lick.)

 

As for the yard, try this:

http://www.gardenguides.com/91659-kill-hookworms-roundworms-yard.html

 

My vet also changed me from HeartGard Plus to Interceptor. Since she already has a worm problem he felt it was better to use broader spectrum monthly worm prevention.

 

I am just beginning round 2 of the Panacur C this week. After the first session her stools looked better already- no mucus, no pink tinge of blood, no diarrhea. I will let you know how successful I am.

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Guest Energy11

This is what I am doing for Houdini:

Start with Panacur C- once a day for three days in a row. Repeat every three weeks until you have done three 'rounds'. (Some people say that if the level of infection is high dose for 5 days in a row.) Wait two weeks after last treatment then recheck stools. If negative, wait three weeks and test again (unless of course you see symptoms.) If fecal test is positive or symptoms come back then repeat treatment program but try Drontal Plus for the second series. This should cover hookworm, roundworm, tapeworm and whipworm.

 

Cover furniture and car seats (anywhere dog sits) with throws. Wash bedding, throws etc. every few days with hot water. If you have a dog run that has cement, stone etc. - wash with bleach. After each potty walk etc. wipe the anal and back of tail area with baby wipes to remove any larvae, etc. (That way they do not re-infect themselves when they lick.)

 

As for the yard, try this:

http://www.gardengui...worms-yard.html

 

My vet also changed me from HeartGard Plus to Interceptor. Since she already has a worm problem he felt it was better to use broader spectrum monthly worm prevention.

 

I am just beginning round 2 of the Panacur C this week. After the first session her stools looked better already- no mucus, no pink tinge of blood, no diarrhea. I will let you know how successful I am.

 

Sounds like you have this under control! I know hooks can be hard to get rid of, with a BAD infestation.

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Guest MZH

What does bleach do to the grass?

 

One bit of good news. The Peteducation site says freezing weather and hot, dry weather will kill the larvae. Might not have to do anything if the weather conditions are favorable. Yay!

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Guest TeddysMom

One of the things I really love about winter. No fleas, ticks or worms. I still worm my dogs on a 6 week schedule and rotate between Strongid and Panacur from spring until the first freeze because we live in the country with lots of wildlife and feed diatomatous earth every day. I take random stool samples to have them tested every couple of months or if I see that anyone has a softer stool than I like to see. But something must be working because the vet hasn't found any worms this spring at all, I can only hope it lasts.

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Guest Energy11

One of the things I really love about winter. No fleas, ticks or worms. I still worm my dogs on a 6 week schedule and rotate between Strongid and Panacur from spring until the first freeze because we live in the country with lots of wildlife and feed diatomatous earth every day. I take random stool samples to have them tested every couple of months or if I see that anyone has a softer stool than I like to see. But something must be working because the vet hasn't found any worms this spring at all, I can only hope it lasts.

 

 

There are MANY reason to LOVE Winter, which I do, and this IS one! smile.gif

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Guest nnamdismom

To naturally prevent hookworms without the use of harsh and body-taxing preventatives from the vet, you can use Earth Animals "No More Worms" herbal remedy. A healthy immune system is the best preventative for hooks, other worms, fleas and ticks. (The company also has a flea and tick internal remedy powder that works fantastic that is all natural. Introducing garlic into your dogs diet can actually change the sent of his blood to make it smell bitter to fleas and ticks so they do not want to latch).

 

Earth Animals holistic remedies will create a body that is able to reject and fight worms and eliminate them naturally. Worth a try since your vet perscribed method seems to not be working.

 

Also, it may help to treat your lawn with wondercide.

http://www.wondercide.com/outdoor-natural-pest-control-concentrate-kills-repels-100s-of-pests-ecotreat/

 

Hooks are really nasty and so easy to catch. Using herbs and natural remedies will create healthy internal conditions in your dog so that he is less susceptible to these types of attacks.

 

Good luck to you and to your grey!

Edited by nnamdismom

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from what i recall ivermectin- interceptor was the only monthly heart worm med that kept the hookworms at bay. it is back on the market, cost more, but while you are battling hooks you may as well invest in it as well.

 

intersting, read this no bleach.....borax is used and stop watering the lawn- dry out the eggs. but is sounds like your lawn will die no matter what, ;( http://homeguides.sfgate.com/treat-yard-hook-worms-49724.html

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I have had problems with hooks - they are SO hard to get rid of. Last fall my vet had me put my two on Advantage Multi - that is supposed to prevent hook infestation. So far it has worked. The last few fecal tests have been negative. I also treat my yard with Wondercide. I truly hate hookworms!

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Talk with your veterinarian- best and most affordable option- monthly heartworm pill ( I use and recommend Sentinel products) and deworm with Strongid (pyrantel pamoate) 2 weeks after the heartworm pill is given. This is the protocol that I used to eradicate my grey's hookworms. This is also the protocol that many veterinary parasitologists recommend.

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The best remedies for hookworms seem to be to clean the yard of feces every day to try to prevent reinfection. That said, it's an uphill continuous battle in a war which can never really be won.

 

You can always kill hookworms .. until the next infection.

 

We treat with fenbendazole (Panacur), 8 grams per dog (60-80lbs.) for three days in a row, wait two weeks and treat again. The second treatment kills the worms leftover in egg or larval form from the first treatment. As far as we know this should take care of any hookworms in the dog. I don't do another hookworm test, as it costs less to just pay to treat the worms again than to constantly test for them ($) and then pay for treatment (more $). And there's no downside for treating the dog with fenbendazole.

 

Hookworm eggs are very difficult to kill, so reinfections are very hard to prevent The hook worm eggs will over-winter in soil in cold climates and survive in hot summer soil. Please don't think nature will clean your yard. To be sure, you would probably need to remove all the old soil in your yard and bring in new soil to clean all hook worm infestation. Then of course you'd fail as soon as an infected dog pooped again in your back yard (inevitable) or you spilled a handful of the infected soil as you hauled it out the gate. The bad news is, in fact, that there is no approved protocol for killing hookworm eggs and larvae in soil.

 

Thus dogs can be reinfected by

 

1) licking their fur and ingesting hookworm eggs;

2) licking their paws and ingesting egg infected soil;

3) eating infected stools on the ground (that's why cleaning the yard is key);

4) stepping on an infected stool and licking the infected paw or having eggs migrate through the skin;

5) migrating through a dog's skin or paws when they lie down on infected soil;

6) eating a portion of an infected rabbit or mouse or another small animal;

 

We would like to think that the hooks will be gone if we keep our yard clean of feces, do two three-day courses of fenbendazole two weeks apart, and regularly use Heartgard (ivermectin and pyrantal pamoate) which is supposed to control hooks (and other internal parasites) on an ongoing basis. This protocol should usually work.

 

However in recent years we have anecdotal reports that dogs who are regularly treated with Heartgard have continued infections from Hookworm. This has prompted some dog owners to speculate that the mild doses of ivermectin and pyrantal in Heartgard are merely innoculating the hookworms against the anthelmintic medications and not killing them.

 

This possibility, combined with the fact that dog feces are always around -- and the fact that we can't really disinfect our back yards, let alone all our walking trails, our friend's yards and the parks we visit -- hooks will remain a constant battle.

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I think there may be some confusion regarding ova (eggs)/larva overwintering. Hooks will be destroyed in freezing months-whipworms are notorious for surviving over winter. Once a yard is whipworm blessed always blessed :-(

Edited by tbhounds

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I think there may be some confusion regarding ova (eggs)/larva overwintering. Hooks will be destroyed in freezing months-whipworms are notorious for surviving over winter. Once a yard is whipworm blessed always blessed :-(

This is some information from a website (www.biomedcentral.com) with papers on various parasitic issues: https://parasitesandvectors.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1756-3305-5-91

 

"There is, in turn, a significant merit in keeping our guard up against these nematodes even when other parasites are attracting attention and interest. Therefore, the aim of this article is to review the most important features of roundworms and hookworms affecting companion animals, along with critical and focused appraisals on the importance of their pathogenicity, epidemiology and control methods in veterinary and human medicine.

 

"... As for roundworms, hookworms have a complex biological cycle, in which different sources and ways of infection are possible. The most important infectious stage is represented by filariform larvae present in the soil, which infect a suitable host by actively penetrating the skin (especially for Ancylostoma spp.) and/or via the oral route (i.e. Ancylostoma spp., Uncinaria spp.) [7, 13, 22, 27].

 

"...The real truth is that pets are exposed to roundworm and hookworm infections throughout the year and for all their life. Specifically, parasitic burdens, egg output and infection rates are higher in puppies and kittens but it is nowadays established that patent intestinal infections occur in dogs and cats of all ages [41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50].

 

"... In summary, there are major factors making roundworms and hookworms the most common endoparasites in pets all over the World. First of all, the possibility of puppies and kittens being infected by their dam by transmammary and/or transplacental route/s is a powerful host-finding strategy. Also, pups have daily thousands epg counts for T. canis and animals often shed millions of hookworm eggs for weeks, thus causing a high environmental contamination. Ascarid eggs can survive for years in extreme environmental conditions, thus are available for ingestion at any time. Infected paratenic hosts are ubiquitous, being a constant source of infection especially for cats, given their hunting instinct."

Edited by countrypaws

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