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phall

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Everything posted by phall

  1. Yes - I have a good harness for Lucas made by Julius K9. Irene - I noticed the same thing - that Lucas will be able to get in and out on the side door, which I think is much safer than the back. I'll let everyone know how things go.
  2. Thanks, everyone, for your suggestions and ideas. I so appreciate it. I picked up my new van earlier today and I'm hoping that will help Lucas. It is low enough that I'm pretty sure he'll be able to get in and out without needing a ramp! I've tried using key words with him when I want to get him out. MaryJane - I will try using "home" for him to let him know we are home. I will continue to monitor for additional feedback. Thanks again, everyone.
  3. Hi Folks, It's been quite a while since I posted on Greytalk, but thought I'd post here to get some suggestions on working through a behavior of Lucas. I've had greyhounds for over twenty years now and have worked through a lot of different issues with different greyhounds. They certainly are all individuals. I just love the breed. Here's the situation. Lucas is 7 years old (will be 8 in September) - I adopted him at age 3. He is blind from progressive retinol atrophy (PRA) - I knew of his diagnosis and his oncoming blindness when I adopted him. I love him dearly. Lucas is very outgoing and very social. He definitely has a mind of his own and can be a bit pushy - but never aggressive. He loves people. He absolutely loves to ride in the car. He hates the heat and humidity (which is what we're having now here in New England). The behavior I am dealing with and have been dealing with for the past few years is there are times when Lucas will refuse to get out of the car after going on a ride. Yesterday he even refused to get out of the car when we met some fellow greyhound owners and their greyhounds for a walk. I've started keeping a journal to track when this happens to see if there is any pattern. It seems that it usually happens on hot/humid days, but I will confirm this as my journal advances. I have an SUV and he uses a ramp to get into the car. He won't use the ramp to come out - he jumps out with me guiding him. I've tried training him to use the ramp to get out of the car using high quality treats, guiding him, encouraging him - and he won't do it. At first I thought his refusal to get out was due to his blindness and his fear of jumping not seeing where he was going. I've tried very high quality treats - no luck. I've tried having his favorite people/greyhounds come over to see him - no luck. I've tried just pulling him out and he totally freaks and will snap. Plus - I will NOT force him. With his blindness, it is imperative for him to trust me and I won't violate that trust. Lucas does eventually get out of the car when he's ready - if he has to pee or if it's supper time and he wants to eat. So for now, during the hot days where I can't let him stay in the car until he's ready to get out, I don't take him for rides. On the cool days and in the fall, when it doesn't matter if he stays in the car for a few hours, I will work with him more on this. But I worry that if something comes up and he HAS to go somewhere - the vets, etc. - that this will happen. (So far it hasn't - he went to the vets in April and he got right out of the car.) Those of you who have had greyhounds for a long time - have you experienced this? Any suggestions beyond what I have tried? (FYI - later today I am getting a new car - back to a mini-van. I'm hoping that will be much easier for Lucas to get in and out of.) Thanks so much.
  4. I can't wait either, Jen! I will be at your talk, for sure.
  5. I'm in MA, all the dentals I've gotten for my dogs over the past several years have been $800-$1100 depending on extractions.
  6. I went through the same with hooks with just about all my greyhounds over the past several years. After we got 4 clear fecals, we went to just the Advantage Multi. That has worked for us. They will continue on the Advantage Multi for life.
  7. Hi Spock's Daddy - fellow MA resident! I'm sorry Mr. Spock is going through this. I'm wondering if it could be mostly due to his loss of sight. I know you said it has declined over the last year and he now has very little sight. If he has lost pretty much all sight now, even with the gradual loss, he may be still adjusting to that. Even though the house is quiet and the routine's are the same, he may be having a bit of trouble differentiating between night and day. He may be anxious, too, about his sight loss. If that is the case, maybe in a little time he'll be better. I say this because my Lucas is now blind - he's younger than Mr. Spock - only 7 years old. His blindness is a heredity condition and he went blind gradually over a couple of years. It's been the last 3-4 months or so that he's been pretty much completely blind. I share this because even now, occasionally, Lucas will wake up in the middle of the night and seem to "lose his bearings" - be a little anxious,want to come over to me for attention, and sometimes not able to find the doorway of the room etc. One night he got up, had trouble with figuring out where he was and was very anxious. Over the last month or two he has improved and these things happen less and less. Give your boy a hug from me.
  8. My girl Chick had the same thing, and she was about the same age. We continued as you are doing - the taps to drain the fluid and watched her carefully for her comfort level. Each dog is different as they go these things. Chick was with me for a few months and then I made the decision to let her go because it became obvious she was uncomfortable even after the drainings. I knew she wasn't enjoying life - she really didn't want to do anything. It's a really hard thing and my heart goes out to you. As GreysMom said, you will know when it's time. My thoughts are with you.
  9. I use Pets Best. I have had them for a number of years. They've been very good - quick to pay claims and easy to reach. They do increase rates as the dogs get older but from what I hear, that is typical.
  10. I did use this (different brand) a few years ago for one of my greyhounds. It worked well. Much better than the cone. getting the right size was key, and I had to fool with it a bit to fit the way I wanted it to, but after that initial adjustment time, it worked well. I still have it in case I need it again in the future.
  11. I am so glad to hear that Mr. Spock is doing well. I miss seeing you guys on the walks - it's been a long time since I've been on a large group walk (miss Greyhound Adventures!). While my boy, Lucas, isn't a senior yet (he's 6), he has vision issues (hereditary) but also has cataracts. I am not doing anything about the cataracts except monitoring them for eye pressure, because of his other vision issue (progressive retinal atrophy) However I wanted to share with you that Lucas is seen by an ophthalmologist at Blue Pearl in Waltham. Dr. Clara Williams is wonderful. She loves her canine patients and is so kind and gentle. If you decide to talk with someone about Mr. Spock's cataracts, I highly recommend her. She isn't someone who will push for tests that aren't needed. I understand your concern about the dental. Is he having any issues with his teeth? What did your vet say when you expressed concern about the anesthesia? My girl, Faye, passed a few years ago at age 12, had a dental when she was almost 10. (Her teeth were bad.) I told my vet that this would be the last dental for her because of her age and if there were any teeth in question during that last dental they should be removed. She lost 9 teeth, but was so much happier. These are hard decisions as our greys age. You'll make the right decisions for Mr. Spock. Pat
  12. This is on my mind as well. Lucas and Sox have never in the 3 years I've had them had any issue with separation anxiety. They were in a good routine with my work days. Now with Lucas almost completely blind, he is happy that I am working from home. He isn't glued to me, but stays close by napping or just being a companion. I'm hoping when I do go back to the office he'll adjust quickly. I am lucky in that my dog walker is great and will be flexible, I'm sure, but it's still on my mind.
  13. You are trying hard for Tess. I agree with you that you're putting too much pressure on yourself and on Tess. I would maybe take a break from the walks. Let her out into your small garden whenever she wants - not worrying about getting exercise out there. Since she does okay going to other fenced places and playing/running, just do that. It may not always be this way, but for now, let her develop her confidence and not force her to do something she is uncomfortable with at this point. (4 months isn't that long for some dogs.) I had a greyhound like that a few years back (she has since passed away at age 12, I adopted her at age 3). She was a greyhound that never wanted to go on walks and exhibited many of the same behaviors when I forced her to. I got to the point you are at - it's an awful feeling. So, as HeyRunDog said, I accepted her as she was. I stopped insisting she walk (even with my other two greyhounds going). She went out into my fenced yard to do her business and get some time outside - which she loved. She would find a spot, dig around, and lay down to enjoy the sunshine. She didn't do zoomies in the yard - just enjoyed being out there and feeling safe. Eventually - and I mean well over a year - she started showing interest in walking in my neighborhood as long as my other two dogs went along and as long as the only one walking with us was my neighbor that she knew well. She never liked long walks. It was just her. Once we came to this understanding and developed a routine that worked for us both, her trust in me blossomed and I enjoyed just being with her. Good luck.
  14. I'll be there - staying at the Aspire as I go dogless.
  15. A few years ago my boy Star (now at the bridge) was the same way. I took a class for reactive dogs and it helped me hugely. I went to one by Emma Parsons, who I think is great. Her basis was working with your dog, with high quality treats, at the very first sign of any reaction - not waiting until he is barking/lounging. She published a book "Click to Calm". If you check it out, don't get turned off when you see it's for working with aggressive dogs. (Star was not aggressive in any situation except as you describe with your dog.) Her methods worked for me with Star. If you can find a trainer (positive methods) in your area I think that would be very helpful.
  16. I adopted two young greyhounds (2 & 3 years old) 2 weeks apart. They were not siblings and not even at the same adoption kennel. No problems. They did great settling in. I work full time as well and I think it helped them both to have the company. It was a little more complicated than one as neither was housebroken but it all worked out fine. They have very different personalities - one loved being crated, one hated it and would even get out of x-pens, so initially I had them enclosed in a specific area of the house - with the crate in it for the one that wanted a crate while we housebroke. I would do it again without a thought.
  17. It's big changes for her and she needs time to adjust. You mentioned that you started crating her - if she hasn't been crated in a very long time it's hard for her. Can you bring her bed and toys to the new house with her and keep her closed in the bedroom with you at night? Are you just at the new house at night? If so, I'm wondering if you can spend some time there with her during the day as well - that may help her adjust.
  18. I would give him time. I would encourage him to continue walking, but if he doesn't want to I wouldn't force it - everything in the area is new to him and he needs to adjust. I had something similar happen with my boy and in a little time he started walking our full walks again.
  19. My boy, Star, came home to me at 18 months old. He fooled us right from the start - when we met him at the adoption kennel he was very calm and walked well on leash. He was a big boy too. I remember saying to my husband, "Wow - I can't believe how sweet and easy going this dog is at such a young age!". Well, once he got home with us he was still sweet but he only had two speeds - run and stop. I used to say his mantra was, "Why walk when you can run?". He'd run from room to room, he'd run up and down stairs, he'd run when I called him, he loved to run in the yard. Stuffies went everywhere. He jumped up and down at my side when we went out to the yard. He even ended up lying on top of our dining room table. But, he was a wonderful dog. He amazed me when, even at that age, he was wonderful with small kids. Even from the beginning he would be very calm with small kids. He'd be quiet around them - no jumping or running and often lick their faces. Each dog is definitely an individual and it's so much fun watching them settle in. Good luck and have fun!
  20. I'm replying to your question of adopting two greyhounds at the same time and the concern re bonding with you. Three years ago I lost all three of my greyhounds to a variety of health issues - old age, cancer, kidney disease. I was at the point of not having any dogs which I couldn't stand. I always want to have more than one greyhound at a time, so I decided to bring two home at the same time. (They actually arrived at my home two weeks apart.) One was 2 years old, one was 3 years old. They had not met before coming to me, so maybe that was a factor in how they settled in at my house. They got along well (still do) and have bonded. But they both have also bonded tightly with me. It wasn't an issue at all. Good luck as you sort through all this.
  21. I always use Majestic Collars spook harness. I'm currently using it for my shy girl, and have used them for years on the various greyhounds. They are great. www.majesticcollars.com.
  22. Yes - I've been there as well. I tried forcing Lucas, which resulted in him avoiding coming near me, so I gave up and just waited for him to show me he had to go out. He never did have an accident in the house. When he indicated he needed to go (going near the door the way he typically did) and he'd finally run out, I would wait for him and bring him back in immediately so that he didn't have to stay out there very long. That seems to help him and he's gotten better. Now he'll go out regularly but not want to stay out there, which is fine.
  23. There is also information on this on the website of the Greyhound Health Initiative.
  24. I will be there! Arriving Wednesday. Can't wait to get there already!
  25. Yes - I had that with my girl, Sox. Even when she was at the adoption kennel, she wouldn't take treats from anyone's hands. I've had her 3 years now and it took her over a year to take a treat from me. Now she will, but she won't from anyone else.
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