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Guest bob43

My family, wife, daughter and self, adopted a 3 year old female greyhound at the end of Jan 10'. She, Choko, has bonded well with my wife and daughter, but as for me still distant. When I take her for a walk I'm her best friend, but around the house it is different. She will come to me when called, but soon heads for her bed. Have had some moments of hysteria, what I read on another forum as the greyhound scream of death or GSOD, which has started a feeling of wanting to return the dog. Some of those moments; When I told her to stay, and took hold of her collar she yelped and snapped at me, and most recently tried to cut her nails. Cut two nails on one front paw, no problem then touched the other paw and got the GSOD which turned into cowering from me. Today was chasing her around in the backyard and when she came in went to wipe her front paw and GOSD and went into another room. Wiping her paws is not new, we do that after ever walk without any troubles including this morning. I went into the room she was in and called her again to wipe her paws in the same place and way as after walking, big mistake total freak out! Acted as if I was beating her with a club.

 

I was the one that wanted the dog not my wife and daughter, but it is not working out so far. I need some suggestions on how to deal with this problem, please.

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

So you want to return her why? I don't really understand the problem. Have you contacted the group you adopted her from, and explained what your concerns are? First and foremost, you haven't had her nearly long enough to form a bond, so if she is shy with you, there are things to do to help, as well as things not to do. First, if you want a strong bond with her, hand-feed her, you, not anyone else. You do everything with her. Enroll her in obedience classes and take her. Train her daily. Why did you grab hold of her collar? Was she not "staying" when you told her to? If so, does she know stay? Greyhounds don't know any commands while they are active racers, they may know a very select few things, such as up (for females this is the command to jump up into the top kennels), and don't eat the poop. Thats usually about it. When you grabbed the collar, you probably scared her, and she was reacting to you by telling you to stop. If she wanted to bite you, she would have, the snap was merely a warning. Have you read any books specifically targeting greyhound ownership, such as "Greyhounds for dummies", "Adopting the retired racing greyhound"? These two books are indispensable to explain a lot of what your greyhound was exposed to before you adopted her. The paw thing, well her paws may still be very sensitive and when she was running around the yard they are tender, you grab them a bit too rough and she is either hurt or scared. I would lean towards the latter of the two as when greyhounds are truly hurt, you usually wont be able to tell (very stoic about pain). It sounds as if your girl is shy towards men, you need to realize this and work with her to understand you are not going to eat her. When you wipe her paws, are you standing over her reaching down to lift up her legs? If so, this probably scares the crap out of her. If you havent read about greyhounds please do, if you have, please contact your group for additional support, the foster parent or adoption person I am sure would be happy to help. If you adopted anywhere in the Chicagoland area, I would be more than willing to come by and help personally. What you are describing sounds like she just needs confidence, and needs you to be a bit more understanding in your interaction with her. One of my females would run and hide in the back of a crate if I so much as looked at her, now, she is my girl, if I go anywhere she needs to be able to go with me. When I mow the lawn, she watches me through the window. I did the hand-feeding, obedience classes, and walks. I believe the most helpful was the hand-feeding.

 

Chad

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Guest Shermanator

My family, wife, daughter and self, adopted a 3 year old female greyhound at the end of Jan 10'. She, Choko, has bonded well with my wife and daughter, but as for me still distant. When I take her for a walk I'm her best friend, but around the house it is different. She will come to me when called, but soon heads for her bed. Have had some moments of hysteria, what I read on another forum as the greyhound scream of death or GSOD, which has started a feeling of wanting to return the dog. Some of those moments; When I told her to stay, and took hold of her collar she yelped and snapped at me, and most recently tried to cut her nails. Cut two nails on one front paw, no problem then touched the other paw and got the GSOD which turned into cowering from me. Today was chasing her around in the backyard and when she came in went to wipe her front paw and GOSD and went into another room. Wiping her paws is not new, we do that after ever walk without any troubles including this morning. I went into the room she was in and called her again to wipe her paws in the same place and way as after walking, big mistake total freak out! Acted as if I was beating her with a club.

 

I was the one that wanted the dog not my wife and daughter, but it is not working out so far. I need some suggestions on how to deal with this problem, please.

 

 

Give her some time, it sounds like she is still adjusting to her new home.

 

Did she live with a foster family before she came to you? Did they mention anything about a possibility of timidness around men? It took Sherman a good 4-5 months to really start to come out of his shell, he was bounced around before he came home to us. :)

 

As for the screaming and paws - ugh that sounds like my Patton. He HATES anyone touching his paws. He has been home for 6 years, and still when I trim him nails, he must be muzzled at all times, because he will bite. He does not like his feet touched, and we have had some issues with corns, so he is super sensitive. He hasn't snapped at me in awhile while doing nails, but I certainly do not trust him when it comes to nail trimming. :) He's also a screamer. The vet told me the screaming is Patton's way of saying, I do not like that! and I will make you stop anyway I can. :) He hates his feet touched, so he'll scream, and my first instinct is to pull away. Patton's screaming seems to be almost like a little temper tantrum (at least in our home, it is.) At first DH and I tried the tough approach, he'd hold Patton down, and I'd trim nails, and all hell would break loose. Patton was screaming, snapping and trying to get away. It was stressful to everyone. I decided on another approach, and I started to muzzle him, get the clippers, and just sit with him for about 15 minutes. I did this for almost a week. Once he desensitized to that, I moved on to clipping one nail. When I began that, he'd immediately scream, snapped, and launched out of his bed. I quietle led him back to his bed, and just wait until he was calm again. (I didn't try to clip anymore that day.) Once we got one nail done, drama free, I moved on to multiple nails at once. It took a long time, I would soothe time by talking softly to him, and lots of ear scratches and tummy rubs (and treats) between each clipping. It took awhile, but I can at least trim his nails somewhat drama free. :)

 

So, it seems there are 2 issues - she's timid around you, and doesn't like her feet touched. I would recommend first, having your vet check her feet for corns. They may not be visible, but oooh, they are painful. Once she is given a clean bill of health, and she does this, its more behavioral. Patton had one removed, and I saw an immediate difference.

 

As for her becoming more comfortable with you, first, let her come to you. For example, when Sherman first came home, he was having none of it. Wouldn't look at us, nor would he come near us. I started laying on the floor next to him. I'd ignore him, and just let him get used to being near. Then, I started laying closer to him, and moved to sitting near him, and occasionally stroking his head. Soon, he allowed his head in my lap, and so on, and so on. Start slowly, take baby stops. Remember, everything she ever knew disappeared in January. She still is adjusting to her new home. As she adjusts, you'll watch her blossom into a beautiful pet. :) Good luck! Don't stress. Trust me, I know how hard it can be. I wanted Sherman so badly to want to be apart of the family immediately. I was bummed, when he didn't instantaneously bond to us, when he came home. I even called our agency, upset, thinking he hated us, but they said to give him time, and take it slow. It took a couple months, but Sherman learned to trust us, and is just a wonderful dog!

 

This is just stuff I learned and tried with Sherman and Patton. Good luck!

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Guest Shermanator

First, if you want a strong bond with her, hand-feed her, you, not anyone else. You do everything with her.

Chad

 

:) My luck, Sherman is not food motivated at all. I tried the hand feeding, and he was having none of it. :) That's why I started quietly sitting with him. I also did everything with him - walks, (nice long ones together,) I fed him, took him to the park, or pet store, everything I could think of.

It worked for me, Sherman's my velcro boy.

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Is he always scream when you touch 1 particular paw? If so, a visit to the vet may be in order. I also agree with above, that it can take time to form a bond. You don't meet someone and become best friends in the same day. Take her on outings, go to the pet store and buy her a bag of treats, meet some friends for a walk in the park (leave your wife and daughter behind on these outings) and she'll realize good stuff happens when you're around. Good luck.

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Guest jaws4evr

I know ours has the pain tolernace of abour 0.01, so sometimes I or others will pet her the wrong way that we aren't even aware of and she'll scream bloody murder... she's also the most sensitive little dog there is, and picks up on our emotions really well.

 

So yours might have a couple of those as well... low tolernace for pain/discomfort, and a sensitivity to your frusterated/hurt emotions.

 

You could start with some gentler handling "just because"... make sure she's comfortable and relaxed, pet her legs, leave her alone... pet her belly, leave her alone... handle various parts of her body while she's calm and relaxed, independant of feet wiping of nail clipping, not moving farther than she feels comfortable.

 

It will take time, she's still pretty new to your family, and she might even have had some bad experiences with men in the past, so she might be overcoming some emotional biases from her past.

 

Ours still does GSOD now and then, heaven forbid the leash gets under her armpit on walks if I'm not looking! Look out!

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If I'm reading this right, she only screams when you touch a certain paw. I'd have your wife check over that paw very carefully (since she puts up a fuss with you). She may have a cut between her toes, or something else along those lines and it may be causing her pain. If you can't see anything, I'd have a vet check it over.

 

She's still new to the home and needs time to adjust. Some hounds take a lot longer than others. Patience is the key, take things slowly with her and she'll come around.

Judy, mom to Darth Vader, Bandita, And Angel

Forever in our hearts, DeeYoGee, Dani, Emmy, Andy, Heart, Saint, Valentino, Arrow, Gee, Bebe, Jilly Bean, Bullitt, Pistol, Junior, Sammie, Joey, Gizmo, Do Bee

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Guest Swifthounds

My family, wife, daughter and self, adopted a 3 year old female greyhound at the end of Jan 10'. She, Choko, has bonded well with my wife and daughter, but as for me still distant. When I take her for a walk I'm her best friend, but around the house it is different. She will come to me when called, but soon heads for her bed. Have had some moments of hysteria, what I read on another forum as the greyhound scream of death or GSOD, which has started a feeling of wanting to return the dog. Some of those moments; When I told her to stay, and took hold of her collar she yelped and snapped at me, and most recently tried to cut her nails. Cut two nails on one front paw, no problem then touched the other paw and got the GSOD which turned into cowering from me. Today was chasing her around in the backyard and when she came in went to wipe her front paw and GOSD and went into another room. Wiping her paws is not new, we do that after ever walk without any troubles including this morning. I went into the room she was in and called her again to wipe her paws in the same place and way as after walking, big mistake total freak out! Acted as if I was beating her with a club.

 

I was the one that wanted the dog not my wife and daughter, but it is not working out so far. I need some suggestions on how to deal with this problem, please.

 

If you adopted a dog and all members of the household weren't in agreement, that was your first mistake. The second is thinking that you can have a bond this early, especially in light of what has gone on.

 

I'm not trying to be harsh with you, but really, what did you expect would happen? Look at this for a moment from the hound's perspective. Everything she has ever known about life, routine, and survival has gone out the window. Nothing in a racing greyhound's past prepares it for life in a home or the bizarre expectations placed on a dog living in a home. You're expecting this hound to fit into your life and not be a bother. At the same time, you're not expecting much of yourself or the other household members. IF you want the hound to trust, bond, and learn the ropes of a household, you have to have patience, give her guidance, and show her the ropes. If you can't figure out why she screams, doesn't trust you, etc., ask yourself why you're chasing a fearful hound who already doesn't trust...and why you think that would make her more likely to trust you...it doesn't make sense.

 

Hounds are like children. They need nurturing. They need patience. They need to be baby stepped through the new things in life. They need to have parameters set and to respected. I'll bet your daughter didn't come fully trained, understanding all of your expectations of her and potty trained to boot. Why would things be different for a dog? You give them the tools to succeed and they will.

 

Right now you're expecting more of the hound than of the people. Until that changes, none of you will be happy.

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Guest sheila

Sounds to me like she is fine on your walks because she doesn't feel threatened.

 

If it was me I would step back and watch how your wife and daughter approach the dog in the house and compare it to your manner of approaching. If you can videotape it that would be better yet. Sometimes body language is everything.

My experience has been that men have a different way of approaching a dog than most women and kids do. Such as leaning over the dog rather than leaning down in front of the dog. Pushing a hand towards the face rather than offering a hand to be sniffed before making contact. Even a thing as simple as wearing a hat can throw some dogs off.

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My crazy biotch Chloe was the type of dog you are describing. She bonded to me but my DH had to approach her on his hands and knees( her level) for MONTHS. She would hide in her crate when he approached so he would sit by her crate, door open and read or play on the laptop and throw small pieces of cookies in.

 

Today, Chloe is our resident crazy BIOTCH. She is wild and fun and she just needed the time she needed to come around.

 

you need to have lots of love and patience. That's the name of the game.

 

 

ROBIN ~ Mom to: Beau Think It Aint, Chloe JC Allthewayhome, Teddy ICU Drunk Sailor, Elsie N Fracine , Ollie RG's Travertine, Ponch A's Jupiter~ Yoshi, Zoobie & Belle, the kitties.

Waiting at the bridge Angel Polli Bohemian Ocean , Rocky, Blue,Sasha & Zoobie & Bobbi

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Sounds like she is shy of men and you hit a couple common triggers: Bending over dog, taking dog by collar, handling feet. All can be threatening to a dog.

 

Good advice about getting the one foot checked out if she is especially sensitive, but could be just general EEK! BIG GUY GRABBED MY FOOT! I am not a big guy, and I can get that reaction too :lol .

 

If I have to move a dog somewhere, best is to clip on a leash and then turn AWAY from the dog.

 

When doctoring, doing feet, etc., until I know dog is OK with bending over, best approach is to squat down next to dog's shoulder. Basket muzzle on dog if need be.

 

 

Hand feeding and training are good ways of starting to form a bond. So too sitting on the floor in the evening with a little pile of delicious treats and a comfy dog next to you and ... just ignoring the dog.

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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Guest bob43

My family, wife, daughter and self, adopted a 3 year old female greyhound at the end of Jan 10'. She, Choko, has bonded well with my wife and daughter, but as for me still distant. When I take her for a walk I'm her best friend, but around the house it is different. She will come to me when called, but soon heads for her bed. Have had some moments of hysteria, what I read on another forum as the greyhound scream of death or GSOD, which has started a feeling of wanting to return the dog. Some of those moments; When I told her to stay, and took hold of her collar she yelped and snapped at me, and most recently tried to cut her nails. Cut two nails on one front paw, no problem then touched the other paw and got the GSOD which turned into cowering from me. Today was chasing her around in the backyard and when she came in went to wipe her front paw and GOSD and went into another room. Wiping her paws is not new, we do that after ever walk without any troubles including this morning. I went into the room she was in and called her again to wipe her paws in the same place and way as after walking, big mistake total freak out! Acted as if I was beating her with a club.

 

I was the one that wanted the dog not my wife and daughter, but it is not working out so far. I need some suggestions on how to deal with this problem, please.

 

If you adopted a dog and all members of the household weren't in agreement, that was your first mistake. The second is thinking that you can have a bond this early, especially in light of what has gone on.

 

I'm not trying to be harsh with you, but really, what did you expect would happen? Look at this for a moment from the hound's perspective. Everything she has ever known about life, routine, and survival has gone out the window. Nothing in a racing greyhound's past prepares it for life in a home or the bizarre expectations placed on a dog living in a home. You're expecting this hound to fit into your life and not be a bother. At the same time, you're not expecting much of yourself or the other household members. IF you want the hound to trust, bond, and learn the ropes of a household, you have to have patience, give her guidance, and show her the ropes. If you can't figure out why she screams, doesn't trust you, etc., ask yourself why you're chasing a fearful hound who already doesn't trust...and why you think that would make her more likely to trust you...it doesn't make sense.

 

Hounds are like children. They need nurturing. They need patience. They need to be baby stepped through the new things in life. They need to have parameters set and to respected. I'll bet your daughter didn't come fully trained, understanding all of your expectations of her and potty trained to boot. Why would things be different for a dog? You give them the tools to succeed and they will.

 

Right now you're expecting more of the hound than of the people. Until that changes, none of you will be happy.

 

 

Let me be more clear - I wanted the dog and wife and daughter were okay with that, they were not against it. Also Choko is the same with all

males.

 

If I'm reading this right, she only screams when you touch a certain paw. I'd have your wife check over that paw very carefully (since she puts up a fuss with you). She may have a cut between her toes, or something else along those lines and it may be causing her pain. If you can't see anything, I'd have a vet check it over.

 

She's still new to the home and needs time to adjust. Some hounds take a lot longer than others. Patience is the key, take things slowly with her and she'll come around.

 

 

Doesn't matter which paw.

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Men have different voices and different manners of moving. Likely more that than absolute M vs. F.

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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Guest Furmom

It's tough.... I know it first hand. Had my pup before the DH was in the picture and she used to hide behind the couch, Mom and anything when he arrived. Let her know that DAD is the one that good things come from. All of the things listed like walks, feeding, treats and getting down to her level really do help. My girl has now become Dads girl….. she still loves me but I see the glint in her eye when her Dad is around :) Secondly 4 months is a short time.... Bee took 1 and 1/2 years to really come into herself

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My family, wife, daughter and self, adopted a 3 year old female greyhound at the end of Jan 10'. She, Choko, has bonded well with my wife and daughter, but as for me still distant. When I take her for a walk I'm her best friend, but around the house it is different. She will come to me when called, but soon heads for her bed. Have had some moments of hysteria, what I read on another forum as the greyhound scream of death or GSOD, which has started a feeling of wanting to return the dog. Some of those moments; When I told her to stay, and took hold of her collar she yelped and snapped at me, and most recently tried to cut her nails. Cut two nails on one front paw, no problem then touched the other paw and got the GSOD which turned into cowering from me. Today was chasing her around in the backyard and when she came in went to wipe her front paw and GOSD and went into another room. Wiping her paws is not new, we do that after ever walk without any troubles including this morning. I went into the room she was in and called her again to wipe her paws in the same place and way as after walking, big mistake total freak out! Acted as if I was beating her with a club.

 

I was the one that wanted the dog not my wife and daughter, but it is not working out so far. I need some suggestions on how to deal with this problem, please.

 

If you adopted a dog and all members of the household weren't in agreement, that was your first mistake. The second is thinking that you can have a bond this early, especially in light of what has gone on.

 

I'm not trying to be harsh with you, but really, what did you expect would happen? Look at this for a moment from the hound's perspective. Everything she has ever known about life, routine, and survival has gone out the window. Nothing in a racing greyhound's past prepares it for life in a home or the bizarre expectations placed on a dog living in a home. You're expecting this hound to fit into your life and not be a bother. At the same time, you're not expecting much of yourself or the other household members. IF you want the hound to trust, bond, and learn the ropes of a household, you have to have patience, give her guidance, and show her the ropes. If you can't figure out why she screams, doesn't trust you, etc., ask yourself why you're chasing a fearful hound who already doesn't trust...and why you think that would make her more likely to trust you...it doesn't make sense.

 

Hounds are like children. They need nurturing. They need patience. They need to be baby stepped through the new things in life. They need to have parameters set and to respected. I'll bet your daughter didn't come fully trained, understanding all of your expectations of her and potty trained to boot. Why would things be different for a dog? You give them the tools to succeed and they will.

 

Right now you're expecting more of the hound than of the people. Until that changes, none of you will be happy.

 

 

I totally agree w/this. Greyhounds are not for everyone, they are sweet gentle souls and do not respond to being grabbed by the collar and will retreat when they feel threatened. If you feel that it is not working out, maybe the best decision is to call the adoption group and return this grey.

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"Wimp" I find the title you gave this thread offensive. It's good that you have asked for help and several suggestions have already been made. Choko won't see that you've called her a wimp on here, but she'll sense your negative attitude.

 

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Guest Jubilee251

"Wimp" I find the title you gave this thread offensive. It's good that you have asked for help and several suggestions have already been made. Choko won't see that you've called her a wimp on here, but she'll sense your negative attitude.

 

I have to agree. The title just reminds me of a father who teaches his scared-of-water son to swim by tossing him in the deep end of the pool. :P If something as minor as a GSOD when you touch her paws is making you think about giving her up, then do her a favor and let her find a more patient household.

 

Why did you want a greyhound in the first place? Not being facetious now, I legitimately want to know what drew you to the breed.

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Guest bob43

Well it seems that the title of my post "Wimp" has offended some of the responders, but it got your attention. And yes I do feel that this dog is overly touchy, so I used the word wimp. As for why did I want to have a greyhound, I had seen them in various places and went to a greet & meet and liked what I saw. But as in anything what is on the surface and what is underneath are two different things. I am asking for help with this dog, if I did not care I wouldn't me posting on this forum. Maybe I don't fit some of your ideas of what is a greyhound owner, but that is only your opinion.

 

Again I am asking for help with my dog.

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Cut two nails on one front paw, no problem then touched the other paw and got the GSOD which turned into cowering from me. Today was chasing her around in the backyard and when she came in went to wipe her front paw and GOSD and went into another room. Wiping her paws is not new, we do that after ever walk without any troubles including this morning. I went into the room she was in and called her again to wipe her paws in the same place and way as after walking, big mistake total freak out! Acted as if I was beating her with a club.

 

 

 

If I'm reading this right, she only screams when you touch a certain paw. I'd have your wife check over that paw very carefully (since she puts up a fuss with you). She may have a cut between her toes, or something else along those lines and it may be causing her pain. If you can't see anything, I'd have a vet check it over.

 

 

 

Doesn't matter which paw.

 

It doesn't matter now but initially, a painful or scary experience with one paw could have given her a little phobia about you handling either one of them.

 

She is very sensitive right now and may always be to a certain degree. If you can be more gentle and patient with her, you can probably earn her trust. Or if you simply don't want a dog like this, then go ahead and give her back.

 

Jenn

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Hi Bob,

 

From what I'm reading, you seem frustrated because you wanted the dog and yet she hasn't bonded with you. She's bonded more with the family members were were indifferent at the idea of a dog. I bet that stings! But people ARE giving you advice. Just a few of the pieces of advice that were provided:

 

 

  • Be very patient, be very gentle and give the dog time to adjust
  • Make sure all good things come from you (hand feed, treats, walks, etc)
  • Read everything you can on greyhound behavior, like Greyhounds for Dummies, if you haven't already
  • Get her used to your touch by gentle caressing, working up to handling the paws
  • Take her to positive reinforcement obedience training

 

Five months seems like a long time to us, but I've seen people say it took their dog anywhere between a week and 2+ years to really relax into home life. Instead of looking on how to change your dog, I'd probably look at how to change your own behavior to get the reaction you want from your dog. I think the majority of dog issues are human - not the dog. So if you look at your own behaviors and try to make changes (like handling her more gently, being more patient, don't force attention on her/let her come to you) --- you'll see changes. It make take awhile. It may take longer than you want, but you will see changes.

 

If you honestly don't think it's a good match, then I'd absolutely call your adoption group.

 

 

 

ETA - *laughing* Funny, when I saw the title "Wimp" I thought you were talking about yourself, not the dog. Greyhounds are EXTREMELY sensitive. As a dog lover, even I was surprised at just how sensitive once we brought our Molly home. If you come from the "dominant dog/show her who's boss" mindset, it usually doesn't translate that well. You can still be boss, but you don't need to be pushy or forceful to do it :)

Edited by arandomchic

 

 

Jennifer, Mike and the menagerie ---

Molly (Blue Sky Dreamin), Tinker (BT My Lil Girl) and their feline brothers Miles and Lewis

Visit Molly's Photo Album

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WE GOT OUR MICAH AT THE END OF JANUARY AND HE WAS AND STILL IS VERY TIMID BUT WE ARE CONSTANTLY GENTLY PETTING, MASSAGING AND TELLING HIM HE'S A GOOD DOG! WE DON'T THINK MICAH HAS SHOWN THE PERSONALITY THAT WE WILL LIVE WITH EVENTUALLY BUT EVERY FEW DAYS WE SEE SOME SMALL BABY STEPS!! GREYHOUNDS ARE WONDERFUL DOGS (THIS IS OUR SECOND ONE) BUT I THINK IT'S IMPORTANT TO BE SENSITIVE TO THEIR BACKGROUND. THE SUGGESTION ABOUT READING EVERYTHING YOU CAN REGARDING THE RETIRED RACER IS REALLY A GOOD ONE. READING HELPED ME WITH MY FIRST GREYHOUND AND WITH MICAH. IF YOU THINK THAT YOU ARE JUST NOT A GREYHOUND PERSON THAN DO THE BEST THING FOR YOU AND THE DOG AND CONTACT YOUR ADOPTION GROUP. IF YOU WANT THIS DOG THAN YOU ARE GOING TO HAVE TO HAVE A NURTURING ATTITUDE AND LOTS AND LOTS OF PATIENCE TO SEE THE BABY STEPS THAT THEY TAKE. IN MY HOME WE THINK THE WAIT IS WORTH IT. HOPE SOME OF THE ADVICE HELPS YOU! GOOD LUCK.

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Guest TeddysMom

Well it seems that the title of my post "Wimp" has offended some of the responders, but it got your attention. And yes I do feel that this dog is overly touchy, so I used the word wimp. As for why did I want to have a greyhound, I had seen them in various places and went to a greet & meet and liked what I saw. But as in anything what is on the surface and what is underneath are two different things. I am asking for help with this dog, if I did not care I wouldn't me posting on this forum. Maybe I don't fit some of your ideas of what is a greyhound owner, but that is only your opinion.

 

Again I am asking for help with my dog.

 

I just want to tell you that we picked up Spice on the 5th of December and she is just now beginning to be comfortable enough to come out of her bedroom and will lay on the living room floor as long as DH is not out here. She will come to him to get her treats and will now let him pet her as long as he does not move too quickly. We did know that she was a spook before we got her though and we have never pushed her to do anything she doesn't feel comfortable doing. It sounds like it will take a lot of time, patience, love and treats to get your GH to be a trusting member of the family.

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I am really happy you did not adopt my Beau who is a screamer by nature. He lets out the GSOD for everything. Touching his paws? I just don't do it. If I do, he will snap at me. And Beau is the most loving, touchy, kisses like a paint brush up and down your face, tongue in your mouth :blink: and is just generally all over you. But touch his paws? NEVER. Even the groomer will not touch his nails. We have the vet do it. End of story.

 

I hope you did your reading. Have you read this yet?

 

Of all breeds of dogs, the ex-racing Greyhound has never had to be responsible for anything in his life. His whole existence has been a dog-centered one. This breed has never been asked to do anything for itself, make any decisions or answer any questions. It has been waited on, paw and tail. The only prohibition in a racing

Greyhound's life is not to get into a fight----------------or eat certain stuff in the turn out pen.

 

Let us review a little. From weaning until you go away for schooling, at probably a year and a half, you eat, grow and run around with your siblings. When you go away to begin your racing career, you get your own "apartment," in a large housing development. No one is allowed in your bed but you, and when you are in there, no one can touch you, without plenty of warning.

 

Someone hears a vehicle drive up, or the kennel door being unlocked. The light switches are flipped on. The loud mouths in residence, and there always are some, begin to bark or howl. You are wide awake by the time the human opens your door to turn you out. A Greyhound has never been touched while he was asleep.

 

You eat when you are fed, usually on a strict schedule. No one asks if you are hungry or what you want to eat. You are never told not to eat any food within your reach. No one ever touches your bowl while you are eating. You are not to be disturbed because it is important you clean your plate.

 

You are not asked if you have to "go outside." You are placed in a turn out pen and it isn't long before you get the idea of what you are supposed to do while you are out there. Unless you really get out of hand, you may chase, rough house and put your feet on everyone and every thing else. The only humans you know are the "waiters" who feed you, and the "restroom attendants" who turn you out to go to the bathroom. Respect people? Surely you jest.

 

No one comes into or goes out of your kennel without your knowledge. You are all seeing; all knowing. There are no surprises, day in and day out. The only thing it is ever hoped you will do is win, place or show, and that you don't have much control over. It is in your blood, it is in your heart, it is in your fate-- or it is not.

 

And when it is not, then suddenly you are expected to be a civilized person in a fur coat. But people don't realize you may not even speak English. Some of you don't even know your names, because you didn't need to. You were not asked or told to do anything as an individual; you were always part of the "condo association?; the sorority or fraternity and everyone did everything together, as a group or pack. The only time you did anything as an individual is when you schooled or raced, and even then, You Were Not Alone.

 

In my "mobile abode," the Greyhounds each have several unique names, but they also have a single common name: it is Everybody. We continue to do things as a group, pack or as we are affectionately known in-house, by Kathleen's Husbandit, "The Thundering Herd."

 

Back to those who have not been permanently homed. Suddenly, he is expected to behave himself in places he's never been taught how to act. He is expected to take responsibility for saying when he needs to go outside, to come when he is called, not to get on some or all of the furniture, and to not eat food off counters and tables. He is dropped in a world that is not his, and totally without warning, at that.

 

Almost everything he does is wrong. Suddenly he is a minority. Now he is just a pet. He is unemployed, in a place where people expect him to know the rules and the schedule, even when there aren't any. (How many times have you heard someone say, "He won't tell me when he has to go out." What kind of schedule is that?) Have you heard the joke about the dog who says, "My name is No-No Bad Dog. What's yours?" To me that is not even funny. All the protective barriers are gone. There is no more warning before something happens. There is no more strength in numbers. He wakes up with a monster human face two inches from his. (With some people's breath, this could scare Godzilla.) Why should he not, believe that this "someone," who has crept up on him, isn't going to eat him for lunch? (I really do have to ask you ladies to consider how you would react if someone you barely knew crawled up on you while you were asleep?) No, I will not ask for any male input.

 

Now he is left alone, for the first time in his life, in a strange place, with no idea of what will happen or how long it will be before someone comes to him again. If he is not crated, he may go though walls, windows or over fences, desperately seeking something familiar, something with which to reconnect his life. If he does get free, he will find the familiarity, within himself: the adrenaline high, the wind in his ears, the blood pulsing and racing though his heart once again--until he crashes into a car.

 

Often, the first contact with his new family is punishment, something he's never had before, something he doesn't understand now, especially in the middle of the rest of the chaos. And worst of all, what are the most common human reactions to misbehavior? We live in a violent society, where the answer to any irritation is a slap, punch, kick, whip, or rub your nose in it. Under these circumstances, sometimes I think any successful adoption is a miracle.

 

He is, in effect, expected to have all the manners of at least a six-year old child. But, how many of you would leave an unfamiliar six-year old human alone and loose in your home for hours at a time and not expect to find who knows what when you got back? Consider that if you did, you could be brought up on charges of child abuse, neglect and endangerment. Yet, people do this to Greyhounds and this is often the reason for so many returns.

 

How many dogs have been returned because they did not know how to tell the adoptor when they had to go out? How many for jumping on people, getting on furniture, counter surfing, separation anxiety, or defensive actions due to being startled or hurt (aka growling or biting)? So, let's understand: Sometimes it is the dog's "fault" he cannot fit in. He is not equipped with the social skills of a six-year old human. But with your love and help, you can make it happen.

 

 

ROBIN ~ Mom to: Beau Think It Aint, Chloe JC Allthewayhome, Teddy ICU Drunk Sailor, Elsie N Fracine , Ollie RG's Travertine, Ponch A's Jupiter~ Yoshi, Zoobie & Belle, the kitties.

Waiting at the bridge Angel Polli Bohemian Ocean , Rocky, Blue,Sasha & Zoobie & Bobbi

Greyhound Angels Adoption (GAA) The Lexus Project

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Guest Swifthounds

Sounds like she is shy of men and you hit a couple common triggers: Bending over dog, taking dog by collar, handling feet. All can be threatening to a dog.

 

Good advice about getting the one foot checked out if she is especially sensitive, but could be just general EEK! BIG GUY GRABBED MY FOOT! I am not a big guy, and I can get that reaction too :lol .

 

Very true. The OP's post was almost a laundry list of what not to do with a dog who is intimidated/scared. In the OP's defense, I don't know what dog expereince he has, or whether anyone told him about these things. If you're not dog savvy, they don't jump out as behaviors likely to backfire.

 

 

Let me be more clear - I wanted the dog and wife and daughter were okay with that, they were not against it. Also Choko is the same with all

males.

 

Well that's better than the alternative. As much as you think it's all males, it's probably just all males that aren't dogmen.

 

 

Men have different voices and different manners of moving. Likely more that than absolute M vs. F.

 

The reason for my distinction between men and dogmen is that there really is a difference. I've had several greyhounds that were either apprehensive of men or all the way to GSOD around men. When I say men, I mean the average men. Interestingly, I found that they didn't react this way to a male greyhound trainer I knew, a male greyhound hauler, or several male kennel helpers. I was curious, so I did a lot of observation. What was different wasn't the deep voice or the larger bodies, but really the whole way they moved, spoke, and interacted with the dog was different. Men have a natural inclination (OK, maybe not natural, but the way we raise them in the U.S.) to assert control over things, often by force, because they can. By force I don't mean by brutalizing, but rather by taking an active and assertive action. With a fearful or shy dog, this just makes them more apprehensive. The dogmen don't approach dogs this way (because eventually, if you keep doing it, you're gonna get bit) and tend to have fewer problems.

 

Well it seems that the title of my post "Wimp" has offended some of the responders, but it got your attention. And yes I do feel that this dog is overly touchy, so I used the word wimp. As for why did I want to have a greyhound, I had seen them in various places and went to a greet & meet and liked what I saw. But as in anything what is on the surface and what is underneath are two different things. I am asking for help with this dog, if I did not care I wouldn't me posting on this forum. Maybe I don't fit some of your ideas of what is a greyhound owner, but that is only your opinion.

Again I am asking for help with my dog.

 

Well, the difference between the meet & greet hounds and yours is that they weren't expected to be good in large, noisy crowds, and adjusted to their new environment right away. No one is criticizing you because they don't think you can be a good greyhound owner. We're offering constructive criticism because we've been there and we want to help you and your dog. Your approach now isn't working - for you or the hound - that's pretty clear. IF you don't try things differently, you're going to end up with a more fearful dog, and be even less satisfied with her.

 

 

Hi Bob,

 

From what I'm reading, you seem frustrated because you wanted the dog and yet she hasn't bonded with you. She's bonded more with the family members were were indifferent at the idea of a dog. I bet that stings! But people ARE giving you advice. Just a few of the pieces of advice that were provided:

 

 

  • Be very patient, be very gentle and give the dog time to adjust
  • Make sure all good things come from you (hand feed, treats, walks, etc)
  • Read everything you can on greyhound behavior, like Greyhounds for Dummies, if you haven't already
  • Get her used to your touch by gentle caressing, working up to handling the paws
  • Take her to positive reinforcement obedience training

 

Five months seems like a long time to us, but I've seen people say it took their dog anywhere between a week and 2+ years to really relax into home life. Instead of looking on how to change your dog, I'd probably look at how to change your own behavior to get the reaction you want from your dog. I think the majority of dog issues are human - not the dog. So if you look at your own behaviors and try to make changes (like handling her more gently, being more patient, don't force attention on her/let her come to you) --- you'll see changes. It make take awhile. It may take longer than you want, but you will see changes.

 

If you honestly don't think it's a good match, then I'd absolutely call your adoption group.

 

 

 

ETA - *laughing* Funny, when I saw the title "Wimp" I thought you were talking about yourself, not the dog. Greyhounds are EXTREMELY sensitive. As a dog lover, even I was surprised at just how sensitive once we brought our Molly home. If you come from the "dominant dog/show her who's boss" mindset, it usually doesn't translate that well. You can still be boss, but you don't need to be pushy or forceful to do it :)

 

All good advice.

 

And, yeah, I thought he was referring to himself as well.

Edited by Swifthounds
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So you have only had her for about 3 1/2 months - it took one of my greys way longer than that to adjust. I have a female who adjusted immediately and loves everyone, especially men. My male is quite the opposite. When I adopted him, he was straight from the track, frightened, growly, snappy, aggressive toward other dogs. They all comes with different personalities. I have worked a long time with my boy and he is an absolute velcro dog now. I don't know you or your grey, but you really should just respect her and not push too much. If she doesn't like her nails cut or paws touched, don't do it - take her to the vet or groomer for now. Let her go to her bed and respect that. Start out, if you truly feel you love her, by trying your best to bond with her slowly. Give her treats, walk with her (which you do), take her to Meet and Greets to see other people and dogs. You will also get great info there from fellow dog owners. Try not to be too hard on her or yourself. It is great you are seeking help and believe me, you will be a proud greyhound owner, just find out about the breed as much as you can and don't push her beyond her comfort zone.

 

Good luck -

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