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Hello, I'm New And Waiting For My Dog!


Guest KatyC
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Hello everyone,

 

I have been reading this forum for nearly a year now, but I thought I should finally sign up and say hello as we are only 7 weeks from getting our greyhound Peggy now!

 

She's 4 years old and still racing at the moment. We will be getting her on the 2nd of January and it seems like such a wait! She's done 52 races and seems to be ready to retire now (she came last on Saturday night) which is lucky for us as we fell in love with her when we met her. :heart

 

My sister in law adopted Peggy's brother 2 years ago coincidentally (which is how we came to love greyhounds) so it will be great for them to meet each other again too.

 

Any advice anyone's got on settling her in for the first few weeks would be great. We have taken a few weeks off work to make it easier and have already aquired many beds/duvets and cuddly toys!

 

 

Thanks

 

Katy

 

Picture in below link

 

http://cardboardbox....age/35635925012

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She is very beautiful. If you do a search here in GT, you'll find lots of info about preparing for a new pup.

 

Kathleen Gilley wrote this awhile ago, but the info can be very helpful to new owners. Enjoy!

 

This breed has never been asked to do anything for itself, make any decisions or answer any questions. It has been waited on, paw and tail. The only prohibition in a racing Greyhound's life is not to get into a fight----------------or eat certain stuff in the turn out pen.

Let us review a little. From weaning until you go away for schooling, at probably a year and a half, you eat, grow and run around with your siblings. When you go away to begin your racing career, you get your own "apartment," in a large housing development. No one is allowed in your bed but you, and when you are in there, no one can touch you, without plenty of warning.

Someone hears a vehicle drive up, or the kennel door being unlocked. The light switches are flipped on. The loud mouths in residence, and there always are some, begin to bark or howl. You are wide awake by the time the human opens your door to turn you out. A Greyhound has never been touched while he was asleep. You eat when you are fed, usually on a strict schedule. No one asks if you are hungry or what you want to eat. You are never told not to eat any food within your reach. No one ever touches your bowl while you are eating. You are not to be disturbed because it is important you clean your plate.

You are not asked if you have to "go outside." You are placed in turn out pen and it isn't long before you get the idea of what you are supposed to do while you are out there. Unless you really get out of hand, you may chase, rough house and put your feet on everyone and everything else. The only humans you know are the "waiters" who feed you, and the "restroom attendants" who turn you out to go to the bathroom. Respect people? Surely you jest.

No one comes into or goes out of your kennel without your knowledge. You are all seeing; all knowing. There are no surprises, day in and day out. The only thing it is ever hoped you will do is win, place or show, and that you don't have much control over. It is in your blood, it is in your heart, it is in your fate-- or it is not.

And when it is not, then suddenly you are expected to be a civilized person in a fur coat. But people don't realize you may not even speak English. Some of you don't even know your names, because you didn't need to. You were not asked or told to do anything as an individual; you were always part of the "condo association?; the sorority or fraternity and everyone did everything together, as a group or pack. The only time you did anything as an individual is when you schooled or raced, and even then, You Were Not Alone.

Suddenly, he is expected to behave himself in places he's never been taught how to act. He is expected to take responsibility for saying when he needs to go outside, to come when he is called, not to get on some or all of the furniture, and to not eat food off counters and tables. He is dropped in a world that is not his, and totally without warning, at that.

Almost everything he does is wrong. Suddenly he is a minority. Now he is just a pet. He is unemployed, in a place where people expect him to know the rules and the schedule, even when there aren't any. (How many times have you heard someone say, He won't tell "me when he has to go out. What kind of schedule is that?) Have you heard the joke about the dog who says "My name is No-No Bad " Dog. What's yours? To me that is not even funny. All the "protective barriers are gone. There is no more warning before something happens. There is no more strength in numbers. He wakes up with a monster human face two inches from his. (With some people's breath, this could scare Godzilla.) Why should he not, believe that this someone for lunch? (I really do have to ask you ladies to consider how you would react if someone you barely knew crawled up on you while you were asleep?) No, I will not ask for any male input.

Now he is left alone, for the first time in his life, in a strange place, with no idea of what will happen or how long it will be before someone comes to him again. If he is not crated, he may go through walls, windows or over fences, desperately seeking something familiar, something with which to reconnect his life. If he does get free, he will find the familiarity, within himself: the adrenaline high, the wind in his ears, the blood pulsing and racing though his heart once again--until he crashes into a car.

Often, the first contact with his new family is punishment, something he's never had before, something he doesn't understand now, especially in the middle of the rest of the chaos. And worst of all, what are the most common human reactions to misbehavior? We live in a violent society, where the answer to any irritation is a slap, punch, kick, whip, or rub your nose in it. Under these circumstances, sometimes I think any successful adoption is a miracle.

He is, in effect, expected to have all the manners of at least a six-year old child. But, how many of you would leave an unfamiliar six-year old human alone and loose in your home for hours at a time and not expect to find who knows what when you got back? Consider that if you did, you could be brought up on charges of child abuse, neglect and endangerment. Yet, people do this to Greyhounds and this is often the reason for so many returns.

How many dogs have been returned because they did not know how to tell the adopter when they had to go out? How many for jumping on people, getting on furniture, counter surfing, separation anxiety, or defensive actions due to being startled or hurt (aka growling or biting)? So, let's understand: Sometimes it is the dog's fault" he cannot fit in. He is not equipped "with the social skills of a six-year old human. But you can help him.

Jan with precious pups Emmy (Stormin J Flag) and Simon (Nitro Si). Missing my angels: Bailey Buffetbobleclair 11/11/98-17/12/09; Ben Task Rapid Wave 5/5/02-2/11/15; Brooke Glo's Destroyer 7/09/06-21/06/16 and Katie Crazykatiebug 12/11/06 -21/08/21. My blog about grief The reality is that you will grieve forever. You will not get over the loss of a loved one; you will learn to live with it. You will rebuild yourself around the loss you have suffered. You will be whole again but you will never be the same. Nor should you be the same, nor would you want to. Elisabeth Kübler-Ross

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Thanks for your reply, that's really insightful!

We can't wait to give her a lovely retirement, but do understand that it will take some time for her to settle in to a new way of life.

I have been trawling through a lot of the posts on this forum to learn about alone training and housetraining and anything else that might help. It is so useful to have so much information all in one place!

 

Thanks again!

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Guest zombrie

What a cute and goofy picture! She's adorable!

ETA: In the second pic, she reminds me of a female Doolin. Those eyes!

I thought the same thing!!!

She is adorable!!

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Hi there! Peggy is very lovely, congratulations! And you're in Cambs - are you anywhere near me?

 

I'm sure your SIL will help you out when you get her. Basically, you just have to remember that there are a ton of things they haven't seen and aren't used to, and they think everything belongs to them when they first come into your home. They are also usually quite sensitive, so they learn quickly with a quick 'Uh-uh!!' noise when they look as if they're doing something wrong. Feed her twice a day (normal in kennels) and put her out in the garden after meals so she gets the idea that's where she empties. I've only had one or two accidents in newly adopted dogs though, because they're usually quite clean in their kennel areas, and your house will quickly become their new 'kennel'.

 

Don't change the diet too quickly, or give too many treats at first, or you may upset her stomach.

 

Also remember that they are sighthounds, so be cautious with small furries until you know her and what she's likely to think of them. :)

 

The Kathleen Gilley article that Jan (Greytpups) posted is very good and gives you a good insight into how strange things are for an ex-racer when they first get adopted, but you have to bear in mind that Kathleen was writing about American greyhounds, and the system is a little different here.

 

Trainers don't routinely keep the dogs in crates as they do in the US; they're normally kept two to a largeish kennel with a shared bed, so they do get touched while asleep, if only by their kennel mates. For this reason, we have less of the 'sleep startle' problems in the UK, though it's always worth bearing in mind that it's never a good idea to startle a sleeping dog, especially one you don't know well. Even living two to a kennel, it's very unlikely a person will ever touch them while they're sleeping because as soon as someone approaches the kennel block, they all usually start barking and everyone wakes up!

 

If you're interested in taking part in meeting up with other greyhounds sometime (and you're close enough to Peterborough), you might want to join Brambleberry Greyhounds' Facebook group. I arrange 'fun runs' in good weather, roughly once a month, when we have enough people wanting one! We use a training gallop and/or fenced in runs at a greyhound kennel near me.

GTAvatar-2015_zpsb0oqcimj.jpg

The plural of anecdote is not data

Brambleberry Greyhounds My Etsy Shop

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Welcome! It's going to be quite an exciting wait these next few weeks for your Peggy.

My little black Peggy says Hi to you as well and adds:

 

"Human homes can be scary places at first and I was really glad my Dad thought about me by putting masking tape X's on the glass doors, 'cuz I never seen glass doors off leash before. He didn't let me run unsupervised in the back yard for about a week either... something about not being used to stopping quickly and maybe jumping over. I liked the food though, and my comfy beds... and the squeaker toy I found in the first bed and still have too. He also gave me a pretty Martingale collar from a place called www.silverpeacock.com as the Greyhound people said I was a 'twirler' and the leather collar needed to be tight. Apparrently I was walking 'nice and tidy' on my very second day apart from when I saw a cat."

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Thanks so much for your replies. That is good to know about the sleep startle as I kept reading things about that, will be cautious to begin with just in case though as you say!

 

Peggy is actually from brambleberry!!

We would definately be interested in the fun runs once she has settled in. I have been trying to look for fenced in safe areas and haven't had much luck so far so tthat would be brilliant! We are in needingworth near st. Ives.

Thanks again!

 

 

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Thanks so much for your replies. That is good to know about the sleep startle as I kept reading things about that, will be cautious to begin with just in case though as you say!

 

Peggy is actually from brambleberry!!

We would definately be interested in the fun runs once she has settled in. I have been trying to look for fenced in safe areas and haven't had much luck so far so tthat would be brilliant! We are in needingworth near st. Ives.

Thanks again!

 

 

I thought that paddock looked familiar! But I don't think she actually made it onto the website, which is how I get to know about the adoptables! :)

 

Great! It'll be nice to meet her when we get around to it! :thumbs-up

Edited by silverfish

GTAvatar-2015_zpsb0oqcimj.jpg

The plural of anecdote is not data

Brambleberry Greyhounds My Etsy Shop

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Just a warning, I see you've already bought a collar. That's good. But you're going to find that that collar, when placed carefully on a hook, will multiply rapidly if you don't keep a close eye on it. As will other accessories.

 

Welcome to the great international family of greys!

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Guest HoundWorks

Love that picture of Peggy! Good luck with your new girl. I remember waiting for our girl and it really is like waiting for Christmas, except better! Shopping is so much fun too :)

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Well we knew of the place through my sister in law getting their greyhound eli from there. So I gave them an email to speak about our situation and if she thought we would be suitable and then had a phone call about it and the lady said she had a dog in mind who was still racing but she thought that she would fit in well with us and also was a relation of eli (sister we found out later). The next Saturday we drove there to see peggy and any others that might be suitable. We briefly saw another dog first and then peggy. We took her into the paddock and spent some time with her ( and got smitten!) Since then we have been to see her race and got to give her a cuddle afterwards which was nice. She is due to be spayed a month before we get her and then she will recover for the remaining time in the ladies house so will get a bit acclimatised to not being kenneled. Then when she comes to us at the beginning of january they will do a homecheck. We will give 100 pound donation and get a lead, collar, bag of food, muzzle and a months free insurance :) a bargain!!

 

Is the process different in the usa?

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