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Toes Rubbing Together


Xan
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Poor Brilly! :( This isn't a big deal, like osteo or even as big as a broken toe, but the poor dude has an issue. His middle toes on his back feet rub together tightly enough that he has sores on the knuckles. Not deep nasty infected sores, but still, the top layer(s?) of skin are gone, and the surrounding area is blood-tinged.

 

Keeping them clean is important, obviously. And difficult in mud season. :rolleyes: But, heck, they're his toes! How do I keep them from rubbing? Or do I? Do I put corn pads between his toes? Lube them up with Bag Balm? Make him sleep with spacers until they spread out better??? :blink:

 

Anyone else have this problem, or at least some helpful suggestions?

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My Inspirations: Grey Pogo, borzoi Katie, Meep the cat, AND MY BELOVED DH!!!
Missing Rowdy, Coco, Brilly, Happy and Wabi.

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Jack had this problem, and I just used to use bag balm. It didn't cure the problem, but it kept his toes from getting sore. His were exactly as you describe, the very top layer of skin was worn, and there was a little blood-tinged circle around each worn place.

 

He didn't seem to notice it too much - it didn't make him limp, or flinch when I touched his feet (well, no more than usual - he was always freaky about his feet), but I felt the bag balm helped to stop them getting worse.

 

Oh, and the other thing I did was take very careful note of what happened to his toes when his nails were long or short. It wasn't just a matter of keeping the nails short, with Jack, I had to keep them the right length. In the case of two of his toes, this was actually a bit longer than most people would like, because the action of his nails on the ground moved his toes up in a certain way so that they didn't rub so much. Does that make sense?

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Alan had sores between his two of his toes on one back paw. I showed it to my vet, he said there's nothing I could do, but I did use corn pads, yes. I did that for a while. They never bled or got infected though. In time, they seemed to harden, got less red, maybe like calloused. Believe it or not, I only saw Alan take the corn pad off once or twice. The rest of the time he left them on.

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Jack had this problem, and I just used to use bag balm. It didn't cure the problem, but it kept his toes from getting sore. His were exactly as you describe, the very top layer of skin was worn, and there was a little blood-tinged circle around each worn place.

 

He didn't seem to notice it too much - it didn't make him limp, or flinch when I touched his feet (well, no more than usual - he was always freaky about his feet), but I felt the bag balm helped to stop them getting worse.

 

Oh, and the other thing I did was take very careful note of what happened to his toes when his nails were long or short. It wasn't just a matter of keeping the nails short, with Jack, I had to keep them the right length. In the case of two of his toes, this was actually a bit longer than most people would like, because the action of his nails on the ground moved his toes up in a certain way so that they didn't rub so much. Does that make sense?

Total sense! Thanks! That's exactly it, as you describe. He doesn't seem too fussed about me cleaning them or messing with it, but the toes are so tightly pressed, it's hard to even get in there!

The nail length is also a good point. I'll watch that.

 

Alan had sores between his two of his toes on one back paw. I showed it to my vet, he said there's nothing I could do, but I did use corn pads, yes. I did that for a while. They never bled or got infected though. In time, they seemed to harden, got less red, maybe like calloused. Believe it or not, I only saw Alan take the corn pad off once or twice. The rest of the time he left them on.

Did the corn pads stick right to the sore spot? They're sticky on one side, like moleskin, right? I hope they do toughen up ... :unsure: It's strange that I never noticed it before. Maybe it does have to do, at least partly, with the current length of his nails.

 

Thanks, you two. :)

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My Inspirations: Grey Pogo, borzoi Katie, Meep the cat, AND MY BELOVED DH!!!
Missing Rowdy, Coco, Brilly, Happy and Wabi.

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Iput the corn pad/moleskin thingy on the side that didn't have the sore. Alan's sorness was on top of the "knuckles" and by putting the pad between the toes, it kept that top part from rubbing together. Oh, we wouldn't do for them!

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The dog I have the same problem with is a whippet , it is just a smaller version. I have to keep her toe nails short. If they get just a little too long, the knuckles rub terrible. I am at this time dremeling her nails every week. I forgot during the winter and they got just a little too long again. When spring comes and summer she will be outdoors and on walks more, and the problem will be bad, therefore I am starting to dremel every 7 days or shorter time. It is just tipping the nails so the quick is always showing. Becareful not to draw blood. Her nails have gotten a lot shorter already since the quick recedes back into the hard nail bed for protection. Therefore a shorter nail and no rubbing.

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Nails. Must be the issue. Like you say, dixidoll, not as much walking on dry, hard surfaces in the winter combined with not being as diligent with the dremel and voila!

 

Okay, so cornpads wouldn't really work for B, since he's sore on both sides. Not that he's complaining! I'll keep him lubed up, and get back to basics on those nails!

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My Inspirations: Grey Pogo, borzoi Katie, Meep the cat, AND MY BELOVED DH!!!
Missing Rowdy, Coco, Brilly, Happy and Wabi.

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Same thing happened to Shane two days ago. In his case it seems the nail was short enough to dig into the skin of the toe next to it. As one of the earlier posters said, it needs to be the "right" length. Thanks for bringing this up!

Mary with Jumper Jack (2/17/11) and angels Shane (PA's Busta Rime, 12/10/02 - 10/14/16) and Spencer (Dutch Laser, 11/25/00 - 3/29/13).

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Paradise has this problem also. What we found is the powder that vets use in between a cast and the skin works great to help heal these sores. We watch Paradise closely and if she is getting sores, we powder her up for a few days and they go away. :)

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Argos had that same problem. A few times, it turned into an open sore that bothered him, but neosporin, a gauze pad, and vet wrap at night took care of them. Generally I just checked them often and followed up if they were extra irritated.

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Guest earlkattangrey

Kattan came to me with this problem exactly, he's only been off track about 5 wks. Read here to do Epsom salt soaks daily for 5-10 min. Been doing that and it has helped even within the five days before I had him in to the vet for his first exam. Vet said the Epsom salt was helping and the key was it needed to keep dry, so the antibiotic ointment I'd been using after soaks couldve potentially prolonged healing. So, she also gave me an antibiotic powder that she said also has pain relief in it. It's called Neo-Predef and was $29. She also said after he gains weight they might not rub together so badly. He's pretty darn skinny atm as he's had tape and hookworms and surgery and two homes and food changes over the last 5 wks.

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You could have him checked for damage or injury to the digital sesamoid bones in that foot. That can cause the toes to start rubbing together and can be treated fairly easily with injections and topical ointments of steroids or other anti-inflammatories. It's not hugely common, but it does seem to happen more often in greyhounds and rotties.

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to purchase a little Temporary Safety,
deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
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I wondered about keeping even Bag Balm on it, in terms of it being kept moist, and also that it might collect muddy grit, making the problem worse. :rolleyes:

 

The idea of keeping it dry appeals, as does the tuf-foot.

 

Since it doesn't actually seem to be bothering him (yet?), I'm reluctant to do anything involving injections, antibiotics or steroids, but the idea that it might be something structural is important to keep in mind, so thanks Cheryl2.

 

Earlkattangrey, good luck with your guy! I'm sure he'll settle in now that he's found his forever home. :)

 

I did get the ol' Dremel back out today, and everyone got a good touch-up, so something good has come of it, anyway! :lol

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My Inspirations: Grey Pogo, borzoi Katie, Meep the cat, AND MY BELOVED DH!!!
Missing Rowdy, Coco, Brilly, Happy and Wabi.

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