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Broken Tooth!


Guest SusanP
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Guest SusanP

I just noticed last night that one of Zippy's upper molars is broken--really broken: The entire outer side is missing, exposing the pulp cavity inside. Looks like it chipped off above the gumline, because the gum is just fine. No wonder she's been chewing her Booda Velvets less than usual...

 

I guess she'll need a dental? The remaining tooth is sharp, and I guess it's possible she's got some pain with it. Will they probably extract it?

 

I'm trying to figure out how she did this, though...?

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Can't help you on how the tooth broke (I'd guess maybe a cavity?), but it will most probably be extracted. Based on my experience, she'll be happier without it.

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Marc and Myun plus Starbuck (the cat)
Pinky my AWOL girl, wherever you are, I miss you.
Angels Honey (6/30/99-11/3/11) Nadia (5/11/99-6/4/12) Kara (6/5/99-7/17/12) Cleo (4/13/2000-4/19/2014)

Antnee (12/1/2002=2/20/17)

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Guest ddsgreys

I would think they will have to take it out. Jamie, our oldest, caught his tooth on his crate, not sure just what he was trying to do, but his tooth was sticking out of his mouth and they pulled it out and he does just fine without it..

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If you go to a canine dentist instead of a regular vet, you will have a few more options other than extractions. It can't hurt to get a second opinion.

 

 

Three of my 4 girls go to the dentist instead of a vet. I just like the work better. Many vets leave a tooth in with exposed roots. Well food gets stuck in the "valley" created by the roots. That can't feel good.

 

My girls have healthier mouths, albeit minus a few more teeth than most. But they feel good, and no bad breath.

 

 

 

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Guest david_42

I think extraction is the best option. Anything else will get expensive fast and not really make any difference long-term.

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Guest SusanP

I don't know of any canine dentists around here, but my vet's really good with teeth. She has extracted teeth because of roots exposed leaving a hole, but once also saved such a tooth with just the beginnings of a hole by doing a gum graft over the root at no extra charge on our old girl Simon. The graft took and has stayed just fine for 3 years now. If she feels this one needs extraction, we'll do it. So much of the tooth is gone I imagine things can only get worse with it. Poor Zippy, she's always loved to chew, but she still has all her other teeth. Made an appt for a full dental in a week--it's been 4 years since her last dental anyway, though her teeth look very clean and her gums are healthy. Sigh...

 

Do dogs often break teeth? How does it usually happen?

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Honey broke one, but I'm not sure how she managed it. I don't think it's all that common unless the dog has bad teeth to beging with (but I could be wrong). She should do fine without the tooth.

gallery_15026_2920_5914.jpg
Marc and Myun plus Starbuck (the cat)
Pinky my AWOL girl, wherever you are, I miss you.
Angels Honey (6/30/99-11/3/11) Nadia (5/11/99-6/4/12) Kara (6/5/99-7/17/12) Cleo (4/13/2000-4/19/2014)

Antnee (12/1/2002=2/20/17)

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Rickie had a similar break - I think it happened with a knuckle bone (no more at our house now). We went to a dental specialist who removed the broken part, did a root canal and a restoration. For most, the story would have ended there - expensive, but the dog keeps the tooth. Rickie managed to lose the restorative material twice. The second was even done with some extra-high-tech material that was specially ordered (to her credit the specialist did the second restoration at no charge). The specialist figured his tooth was flexing just enough to break the bond.

 

In the end, she took the tooth out.

 

From what she told me, this result is pretty unusual and would likely not be the outcome for yours. She said it usually only happens when you have a dog that, for example, chews rocks at the cottage.

 

He's just recently cracked off the tips on the same tooth on the other side. This time I expect we'll go straight to extraction, since the outcome if we try to fix it will probably be the same as last time. Aside from the expense, I don't want him to keep going under anaesthetic to fix and re-fix another tooth.

 

But again, this experience is unusual and the outcome for your dog would most likely be better.

 

 

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Sounds like she has a slab fracture--could be very painful if not treated. Most vets will extract the tooth but, a dentist may give you other options. Pain control is a must for a quicker recovery. Hope she feels better soon :P

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Guest greyttech

Sounds like a slab fracture to me. If the pulp is exposed, you should get her to a vet to start some pain meds and antibiotics. You basically have two choices- root canal or extraction. We charge the same for both procedures, especially on the upper fourth premolars (they have three roots and quite the pain to extract.) We prefer root canals b/c you can save the tooth, and they have less post-op pain. In rare cases of aggressive chewers(mostly police dogs) we would place a stainless steel crown on the tooth, otherwise a simple bonding sealent restores the shape of the tooth.

 

Most dogs fracture teeth chewing on hard objects...like nylabones, that are not size appropriate. The best chew toys are ones that soften when chewed.

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Guest Snowy8

Snowy has broken several of her teefies off & I think its from playing. Pipi-Francine has worn her teefies off biting & chewing on her crate (before I got her)...they are ground down!

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Guest Keelyoue

Rush got a root canal and a cap. No lie! It was on her canine though. She broke hers on a bone. That could be one avenue to investigate.

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I believe slab fractures are very often caused by marrow and knuckle bones, which are really really hard. That's why I never give them to my dogs. One of my friends' dog had to get a root canal this way, and I understand they are not cheap!

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Guest SusanP

We haven't given our hounds any bones. Zippy chews on those cornstarch-based Booda Velvet chips. She's 9 and has been chewing on them for 3 years, never broke a tooth before this. They are not super-super hard. It's strange...

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The vet may be able to give you some idea of why the tooth failed. I'm guessing maybe a cavity (but I'm not a vet... and I don't even play one on TV :) )

Edited by MarcR

gallery_15026_2920_5914.jpg
Marc and Myun plus Starbuck (the cat)
Pinky my AWOL girl, wherever you are, I miss you.
Angels Honey (6/30/99-11/3/11) Nadia (5/11/99-6/4/12) Kara (6/5/99-7/17/12) Cleo (4/13/2000-4/19/2014)

Antnee (12/1/2002=2/20/17)

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