Jump to content

Vaccine Reactions, How Common Are They?


How common are vaccine reactions  

160 members have voted

  1. 1. How common are vaccine reactions

    • Very rare, less than 1%
      26
    • Rare, 1-5%
      63
    • Not common, 5-10%
      30
    • Yikes, 10-25%
      31
    • Are you serious?, 25-50%
      8
    • Straight poison, 50-100%
      2


Recommended Posts

Some information on vaccine reaction incidence. I wanted to try to find a canine journal article to quote for incidence of vaccine reactions, but I don't have one... only a cat article so I'll post that and some information from one of the big 3 veterinary CE meetings that goes on every year.

Bill

Lady

Bella and Sky at the bridge

"Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened." -Anabele France

FeemanSiggy1.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Advising Owners on Vaccine Side Effects

Western Veterinary Conference 2002

Michael J. Day, BSc BVMS(Hons) PhD FASM DiplECVP MRCPath FRCVS University of Bristol

Langford, Bristol, United Kingdom

 

Objectives

 

To review the problem of adverse reactions to vaccines.

 

To review the proposals to minimize the occurrence of such reactions.

 

To discuss how best to communicate these points to pet owners.

 

Key Points

 

A range of adverse reactions to vaccines are documented in companion animals.

 

A firm scientific basis for most of these has not been established.

 

The incidence of adverse reactions in terms of doses of vaccine sold is minimal.

 

Vaccines have had a major impact on the control of infectious disease in companion animals.

 

Strategies for minimising adverse reactions to vaccines have been proposed.

 

Veterinary vaccines are distinct from human vaccines.

 

Overview

 

The controversy surrounding adverse reactions to canine and feline vaccines has been one of the major issues facing the veterinary profession over the past decade. It is important that veterinary practitioners understand the facts underlying this debate, and be able to communicate them effectively to owners and breeders. The USA has led in the formulation of specific recommendations to address this problem, which is only now becoming a significant issue in Europe. Key to this area are the concepts of “risk assessment,” “risk communication” and ”risk management.”

 

Risk Assessment

 

That such reactions exist is now clear, but the scientific evidence that links vaccination to the causation of specific clinical abnormalities is limited. The best-documented association is with feline sarcoma1, but there is no accepted mechanistic explanation for the initiation of this neoplasm by specific vaccines. The scientific research that defines a mechanistic association between the onset of various immune-mediated diseases and vaccination is considerably less extensive. There is continued need for definition of the extent of this problem by well-funded epidemiological research. Existing evidence, based on the collection of suspect adverse reactions (SAR) by drug companies and government agencies suggests that the incidence of such reactions is extremely low2.

 

Risk Communication and Risk Management

 

What practical advice and recommendations should be given to owners or breeders who are concerned about adverse reactions to vaccination? The process of presenting this information in a clear and open manner is referred to as “risk communication” 3, and the application of these concepts lies in the area of 'risk management'. The key points for discussion are listed below.

 

Vaccination is of benefit to the individual and to the population in prevention and control of infectious disease, and being unvaccinated does place an animal at risk. This risk increases as the unvaccinated population of animals increases. This is best illustrated by the recent recrudescence of canine distemper in geographical areas where reduced vaccine usage, or use of a product of inadequate efficacy, was practiced. The modification of vaccine protocols to avoid future adverse reactions must therefore be assessed in light of the risk to the individual and to the population of being exposed to infectious disease.

 

The risk to an individual animal of not receiving a booster vaccine can be assessed by measurement of specific antibody status4,5,6. Animals with “protective” titres may not necessarily require revaccination at that time. However, the value of measurement of antibody versus cell-mediated immunity in assessing protection from disease should be considered. Related to this, the “maximum duration of immunity” and the “maximum duration of protection” has not been defined for most veterinary vaccines by experimental challenge studies.

 

Vaccine regimes can be modified to reduce the perceived risk from “over-vaccination” 7,8,9. In this regard, the USA has been more proactive than Europe in publishing such revised protocols. For example, the recommendations for 3 yearly feline boosters, protocols for specific sites of administration of different vaccines, decreasing the use of polyvalent and alum-adjuvanted vaccines, and the concept of “core” (e.g., distemper, adenovirus, parvovirus, rabies) and “optional” vaccines (e.g., leptospirosis, borreliosis, kennel cough) have received much publicity. Vaccine schedules might be tailored to the needs of individual animals, or be appropriately modified for breeds in which there may be a greater prevalence of adverse reactions.

 

Although perhaps obvious, it is wise to stress to lay owners that veterinary vaccines are distinct from human products and that concern over adverse reactions to animal vaccines should not flow into the human public health arena. This is a particularly significant concept in the UK where recent public controversy over the use of combined measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine in infants has led to a 25% failure rate in infant vaccination nationwide, and the re-emergence of childhood measles.

 

Summary

 

Adverse reactions to veterinary vaccines clearly exist, but their prevalence is very low and the scientific basis for their causation remains unknown. A range of approaches may be adopted for animals that are considered at risk for developing such a reaction, including monitoring of protective immune status and the administration of alternative vaccine regimes. The adoption of these approaches must be based on risk assessment of the individual and population with respect to exposure to infectious disease. Vaccines have made a major impact on infectious disease control in companion animals, and altered vaccine usage can change the prevalence of disease within a population.

 

References

 

1. McEntee MC, Page RL. Feline vaccine-associated sarcomas. J Vet Intern Med. 2001; 15: 176-182.

 

2. Gray AK. Cat and dog vaccination: results from the Suspected Adverse Reaction Surveillance Scheme. Vet Rec. 1998; 143: 455.

 

3. Glickman LT. Weighing the risks and benefits of vaccination. Adv Vet Med. 1999; 41: 701-713.

 

4. McCaw DL, Thompson M, Tate D, et al. Serum distemper virus and parvovirus antibody titres among dogs brought to a veterinary hospital for revaccination. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1998; 213: 72-75.

 

5. Tizard I, Yawei N. Use of serologic testing to assess immune status of companion animals. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1998; 213: 54-60.

 

6. Twark L, Dodds WJ. Clinical use of serum parvovirus and distemper virus antibody titers for determining revaccination strategies in healthy dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2000; 217: 1021-1024.

 

7. Scott FW, Geissinger CM. Long-term immunity in cats vaccinated with an inactivated trivalent vaccine. Am J Vet Res. 1999; 60: 652-658.

 

8. Dodds WJ. Vaccination protocols for dogs predisposed to vaccine reactions. J Am Anim Hosp Assoc. 2001; 37: 211-214.

 

9. Schultz RD. Current and future canine and feline vaccination programs. Vet Med. 1998; 93: 233-254.

Bill

Lady

Bella and Sky at the bridge

"Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened." -Anabele France

FeemanSiggy1.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

World Wide Web-Based Survey of Vaccination Practices, Postvaccinal Reactions, and Vaccine Site-Associated Sarcomas in Cats

J Am Vet Med Assoc 220[10]:1477-1482 May 15'02 Survey 8 Refs

Glenna M. Gobar, DVM, MPVM, MS, and Philip H. Kass, DVM, PhD, DACVPM *

Section of Biometrics and Preventive Medicine, Department of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 [* address correspondence]

OBJECTIVE: To quantify incidence of vaccination practices, postvaccinal reactions, and vaccine site-associated sarcomas in cats.

DESIGN: Epidemiologic survey.

ANIMALS: 31,671 cats vaccinated in the United States and Canada by veterinarians with World Wide Web access.

PROCEDURE: Veterinarians used secure Web-based survey forms to report data regarding administered vaccines, postvaccinal inflammatory reactions, vaccine site-associated sarcomas, and detailed information and history on each sarcoma. Data were collected from Jan 1, 1998 to Dec 31, 2000, allowing a 1-to 3-year follow-up of vaccinated cats.

RESULTS: Participants reported administering 61,747 doses of vaccine to 31,671 cats; postvaccinal inflammatory reactions developed in 73 cats (11.8 reactions/10,000 vaccine doses), and qualifying vaccine site-associated sarcomas developed in 2 cats (0.63 sarcomas/10,000 cats; 0.32 sarcomas/10,000 doses of all vaccines).

CONCLUSIONS & CLINICAL RELEVANCE: These findings indicate that the incidence of vaccine site-associated sarcomas is low and is not increasing. Thoughtful consideration of the relative risks and benefits of specific vaccines remains the best means of reducing the incidence of sarcomas. It is not necessary to remove postvaccinal granulomas unless malignant behavior is apparent or they persist > 4 months.

Bill

Lady

Bella and Sky at the bridge

"Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened." -Anabele France

FeemanSiggy1.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think there are quite a lot of reactions to vaccines that dog owners just

don't realise to be vaccine reactions. Normally people don't think in adversary

reactions when taking their dog to the vet to get their annual shots.

Later there are many dogs that are tired, get diarrhea, don't feel well or

even show allergic reactions and the owners don't attribute these symptoms

to vaccines.

My female Soldi started having bloody colitis attacks when 9 months old.

Every time she got a shot, she got colitis that same night and then again

every 14 days. I haven't vaccined her for three years now. Her colitis has

nearly disappeared, she gets it for one day every 2 months and without

blood most times. I'll never vaccine her again as it seems to be an autoimmune

issue that gets worse with vaccines. My male hasn't been vaccined for 4

years now. I personally don't believe in annual vaccines to be harmless for

our dogs. I will vaccine every 3 - 5 years and provide a healthy diet and life.

--------------------------------------------

user posted imageuser posted image

Marion, Ivy & Soldi

 

Perseverance is not a long race...

it is many short races one after another.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think there are quite a lot of reactions to vaccines that dog owners just

don't realise to be vaccine reactions. Normally people don't think in adversary

reactions when taking their dog to the vet to get their annual shots.

That is a very good point actually. Our clinic does discuss with owners to be aware of various reactions from lethargy to vomiting to diarrhea, etc. and to call if noted. It is very rare that we receive a phone call. You are right though in that there probably are a lot of unreported minor reactions!

Bill

Lady

Bella and Sky at the bridge

"Until one has loved an animal, a part of one's soul remains unawakened." -Anabele France

FeemanSiggy1.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

None of my dogs has ever had an adverse reaction - apart from just one time when one of them had a small swelling at the site for a few days. I think it was Susan - and as it turned out, she wasn't well at all, though we didn't know it then.

 

I don't remember very many reactions at all from my days with the vets. I think some do occur because the dog is not fit and healthy (usually the owner isn't aware the pup isn't well, he's just starting something), because either the immune system is not functioning perfectly or is overloaded at the time. But they're usually minor. JMO.

GTAvatar-2015_zpsb0oqcimj.jpg

The plural of anecdote is not data

Brambleberry Greyhounds My Etsy Shop

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's always difficult to obtain general information as every dog, every

situation and every dog owner is different. There are many dogs that

never, ever would develop any health problem due to vaccination and other

dogs do develop reactions due to the nature and condition of their "system".

These problems can occur directly after the shots or after a certain time

when people don't think anymore about a possible correlation with the vaccine.

I really wonder how many veterinarians do research about the origin of a

health problem. Most vets just try to eliminate the problems by medicating,

and that's what most dog owners expect them to do.

My father is an excellent vet (now retired ) and although unfortunately

or fortunately I didn't study the vet carreer, his respectful way of considering every living organism a natural unity have influenced my critical attitude

considering overmedication and overvaccination.

--------------------------------------------

user posted imageuser posted image

Marion, Ivy & Soldi

 

Perseverance is not a long race...

it is many short races one after another.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My border collie did have a severe reaction after a vaccine, however it was due to the location of the vaccine, not the vaccine itself. A vet I didn't usually see gave her vaccine in her hip and that night she woke up unable to move her back legs. Rushed her to e-vet and they felt the vaccine had bruised a nerve. My normal vet met me later in the day to check her and she was getting better at that point, but he agreed that is probably what happened. I admired him for that because it was his partner that had given the first shot. She has had the same vaccines since then, but always between the shoulder blades.

Lynn mom to:Roper(Roper is Here),Josie the Australian Cattle Dog mix, Lacey the Corgi mix, Allie the cat and 2 skin kids and at the bridge Bailey (AA's Bailey), Snickers(Jax Snickers) , Sabrina the Collie and Sadie the Border Collie mix.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pixel is always quiet and just not 100% for a day or so after her vaccine but dont think thats the same as yours in US, we only cover them for parvo & distemper

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Shirl, don't you do lepto and canine hepatitis as well as parvo and distemper? I know bordetella is optional, but the kennels round our way insist on all the others ...

 

I'd certainly do the lepto anyway. You're never more than 9 metres from a rat you know :lol

GTAvatar-2015_zpsb0oqcimj.jpg

The plural of anecdote is not data

Brambleberry Greyhounds My Etsy Shop

Link to comment
Share on other sites

oops just read the card, yes they are on it too :blush:lol I always thought it was just parvo and distemper that we vaccinated for

Edited by shirl
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There can be localized and systemic reactions and I've seen both over the years. I used to give my own vaccines to my dogs but always made sure I gave them during a time when my Vet's office was open - just in case. I always made sure I would be close by for at least 2 hours after administring shots. I had dogs react to vaccines that never had reacted previously.

I had a nightmare Sheltie litter some years ago, 8 pups and they all had shot reactions. Changed pharmacuticals and they still had reactions. I know one reacted to a Rabies vaccine. My Vet and I were stumped coming to the conclusion that there was something definitely wrong with the immune systems on these dogs. This was a litter from a one of my CH females (that had been bred before) and a CH stud that had been used widely. So, I knew the health history on my own bitch and knew the history of the stud dog. Obviously, something didn't click here. Pups, outwardly were gorgeous. I made sure every one of them was spay or neutered. Heartbreaking. Nope, never repeated that breeding or close to it. :dunno

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Jess_Hank

What I consider a full fledged reaction - once in 5 years. A Weim was given a DA2PPL, Bordetella, Lyme and Rabies on the same day. Came to the clinic I was working at as an emergency, the owner was driving home from the vaccination clinic when the dog went into seizures.

 

So, under that, I don't think they are that common. That case, IMO, was stupidity, I don't agree with giving all vaccinations at the same time - that's just asking the immune system to have problems.

 

I've seen too many cases of parvo to not vaccinate my dogs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

My sister's dog swells up like a balloon after any vaccine. Entire body gets puffy adn then the site develops a bump.

 

I will say that the vet at first was leary to say it was a vaccine reaction! As if dogs just get random adema for no reason!

 

So few incidents are reported IMO not because they do not exist but because they are simply not reported. I did not ask the vet if he reported Angel's reaction but with his attitude, I doubt he did.

 

Now ask me if I think annual revaccination causes more than immediate harm and we can talk! ;)

Edited by Cindy and Thunder

Cindy Missing my Thunder... Copper and Cowboy

 

siggy.jpg

 

GPA-Wisconsin

 

GPA-Wisconsin E-Bay Benefit Auctions

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest 6hounds4Iggies

Er just lost our nine year old Siamese to a shot reaction about two weeks ago. She had been vacinated yearly with no problems in the past. Her reactions was so severe it was like I had poisoned her and we called the company who produced the serum and tlaked with their vets and they agreed it was the most severe type of reaction. Go figure....8 years not a sign of a reaction and then literaly dead in hours. We were unable to save her and watched all the other cats carefully and did report it to the company which they appreciated but it does not bring Sassy back and we feel awful even though we were just trying to do the right thing.

 

I have an IG that will swell after a shot in the neck area....so I think it is more common than realized.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest SixteenPaws
Er just lost our nine year old Siamese to a shot reaction about two weeks ago. She had been vacinated yearly with no problems in the past. Her reactions was so severe it was like I had poisoned her and we called the company who produced the serum and tlaked with their vets and they agreed it was the most severe type of reaction. Go figure....8 years not a sign of a reaction and then literaly dead in hours.

I have been researching this issue some because for 5 years, I vaccinated my poodle yearly with no problem at all. Then, on the 6, 7, and 8th year, she gets horribly sick each time. This last time at 8 years old she ended up having to be hospitalized. I discussed with the vet before he gave her the shot if he thought it was possible for the animals to build up an immunity to the vaccines and if so couldn't giving them to them cause adverse reactions?? Possibly, he said, but he recommended yearly vaccines strongly. I honestly feel that they are not needed yearly to maintain immunity. What person gets vaccines yearly for life? Do our children not take a series of vaccines and then stop, and supposedly have an immunity for life? They why would our animals need them for life? Couldn't it be possible that they too can build up an immunity for life? Seems logical. My vet in GA refused to give vaccines more that once every three years because he said we were killing our animals with too many vaccines. I think either you should vaccine them yearly up to a certain age, say 5 or 6 and then they don't need no more, or vaccinate them every three years instead of yearly. I know for sure my Toy Poodle will never get another vaccine as long as she lives except for rabies only b/c it is required by law. I honestly believe her little body has built up sufficient immunities, and the vaccines are poisioning her. I will put my other animals on the same 3 year schedule. But I refuse to pump my animals full of poision that they don't need. It makes no sense to do something to a perfectly healthy dog that makes her extremely ill. No problems all year long, until she takes a vaccine, then she ends up hospitalized?? I don't think so.

Like I said, I have done much research on the subject, and after looking into it and experiencing the reactions of my own dog, I feel I have made the best decision for my dogs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi- I don't automatically vaccinate any of my animals anymore.All of them are seniors (ages 10 and up). My vet recommends taking blood titers and testing for immunity before we even consider giving any injections. My one boy,Bogey, has kidney problems and the other boy,Bandit, finished up chemo a few months back.If we have to give immunizations,it will be one shot at a time,never more than in a day.Besides, I wonder,have any of us humans gotten yearly immunizations once we became adults??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Honeysmom

Approximately three days after Honey received the distemper series she had a strange happening of incontinence for about a two hour period and then it stopped altogether-----she had never lost her bladder control before that or since then----the vet said it was not from the immunization and checked her urine and said it was normal. Being a human mother I have always observed the reactions my children had from the various vaccines that were given them ----this loss of bladder control for the short period of time in my opinion was a reaction to the immunization.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Zelante

A lot of dogs have adverse reactions to vaccinations that go unreported. The other problem is that people do not always link the two together.

 

Just this week at agility a woman with a Springer who has Demodex all around her eye was asked if the dog was recently vaccinated. She said yes and when they figured out the timing, it really pointed to the vaccines as a contributing factor to the severe demodex.

 

A lot of owners don't even realize what a vaccine can do to a dog and thus don't equate the two. After working with dogs daily for several years, I think the incidence is much higher than most people think, at least 10-25%.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 years later...
I think there are quite a lot of reactions to vaccines that dog owners just

don't realise to be vaccine reactions. Normally people don't think in adversary

reactions when taking their dog to the vet to get their annual shots.

Later there are many dogs that are tired, get diarrhea, don't feel well or

even show allergic reactions and the owners don't attribute these symptoms

to vaccines... I personally don't believe in annual vaccines to be harmless for

our dogs.

 

I completely agree, Marion.

Cynthia, & Cristiano, galgo
Always in my heart: Frostman
Newdawn Frost, Keno Jet Action & Chloe (NGA racing name unknown), Irys (galgo), Hannah (weim), Cruz (galgo), & Carly CW Your Charming

Princess http://www.greyhound-data.com/d?i=1018857

"It came to me that every time I lose a dog they take a piece of my heart with them. And every new dog who comes into my life, gifts me with a piece of their heart. If I live long enough, all the components of my heart will be dog, and I will become as generous and loving as they are." -- Unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Greyglo

For Bambi who was hypothyroid and had auto-immune things going on, it was common until we traced the source of some of her symptoms. We had titers done for everything including rabies, which I requested special permission for, as she aged.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi- I don't automatically vaccinate any of my animals anymore.All of them are seniors (ages 10 and up). My vet recommends taking blood titers and testing for immunity before we even consider giving any injections. My one boy,Bogey, has kidney problems and the other boy,Bandit, finished up chemo a few months back.If we have to give immunizations,it will be one shot at a time,never more than in a day.Besides, I wonder,have any of us humans gotten yearly immunizations once we became adults??

 

Lynn, do you do titres and one shot at a time only because of other health problems? Would you do regular vaccinations if those problems did not exist? The reason I ask is that when I had titres done once, it was almost $300 for each dog -- it would have been a further $500 each to do a rabies titre. It would be horrendously expensive to titre every year, but I'm not really convinced they need shots every single year. I won't do the 14 yr old at all now because of her health. BTW, they were a few months into the 2nd year from the last vaccination, and titres showed very little remaining immunity.

Edited by ejw
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Cris_M

I think the answer to the OP's question about our personal opinion of vaccine reactions has not only to do with our experiences with our animals' reactions, but also with how we read the question and whether or not we included minor reactions (soreness at the site, lethargy, mild intestinal upset, etc.) under the heading of "vaccine reactions". While these lesser reactions are, indeed, reactions, they are expected reactions. If you took your child in for a DPT, you would expect redness and soreness at the site and a slightly elevated temperature. That might or might not change how you have that vaccination given, but those things would not be considered statistically significant reactions.

 

Getting into the question of when, how and if vaccines are given, and titres and their considerable expense are important, and probably a natural progression of this discussion. That doesn't make them have anything to do with the original question. (Okay, so I am grumpy this morning, and should go play by myself..... :unsure:blush:blink: )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...