Jump to content

First Timer Too


Guest Moonie12
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest Moonie12

Hello to all from Minneapolis! I'm so happy I found this site!

 

So I don't have him yet but the pick up is planned for October 10th! I have never had a greyhound but have had another large mixed breed girl. Since its been 5 years that I've had a dog I'm spending my extra money on all things dog. Besides the basics I'd appreciate any suggestions of things that I may need. I also have a few questions. How do I know what size muzzle to buy? My roommate has a cat and small dog. Her Chin and Moonie met and he didn't seem to pay to much attention to her (he's being fostered with a Pomeranian and cat). But I'd like to get one before I pick him up. Better to be safe than sorry! Also, I saw a bit in the news about transporting your dog. It said to always crate in a car. Here's the problem, I do not own a SUV so fitting a crate in my car is a no go. Should I get a friend with a SUV and crate to bring him home, it's a 20 mile drive. Is it then really necessary to upgrade my car? Last question (for now), the foster mom said they picked Moonie for his name because she said he's blue. But he's gray. I'm adopting him from a rescue here that does not usually foster, and on his description it said you can not apply for this dog because we don't believe in picking a dog solely based on color so they will pick who he goes to. I'm just curious as to why blue greyhounds are considered rare and why gray is blue.

 

Thanks! I'm excited to be a part of this forum!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Congrats on your new dog! I'm not an expert but I can give you a few answers.

 

1. Ask your adoption group about the muzzle, usually the organization provides a basic muzzle and martingale collar (very important that you have the right type of collar for a greyhound, much more important than the muzzle!). If the org doesn't provide it, then the foster should be able to recommend the correct size.

2. I drive a little two-door Honda Civic and I load my greyhound easily into the back seat. She has plenty of room and she usually just lays down immediately and dozes. You definitely do NOT need to upgrade your car. For the long first drive, it is best to have a friend sit in the back with your dog to make sure he doesn't try to be a back seat driver but a crate is not an absolute in the car. I do recommend a blanket or two though.

3. The "blue" describes greyhounds who are in fact gray. It's just a terminology thing. You see gray cats such as Russian Blues referred to in the same way. The blue color (gray) is actually one of the rarest in greyhounds so congrats on getting one! It's a homozygous recessive genetic thing (blah blah here's the Bio degree in me coming out). Greyhounds come in many colors and this blue color just happens to be easily over-ridden by other colors, thus the rarity.

 

Hope these answers helped!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Moonie12

Thanks! Yes, they provide the martingale collar and leash, no muzzle. I'm looking now at the good for sale here! I will be sure to ask her about how to size the muzzle. And good thing about my car, it makes me feel better. I thought I'd be starting out all wrong putting him in the back seat. I've noticed they come in all colors and I guess I haven't seen any blues. Thanks for all the technical information on the color! I appreciate it! I was wondering why they were being so specific on placing him.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Congratulations on your new additional & welcome to greytalk.

 

In the UK the blues aren't rare but are still very popular and so many are imaginatively named Blue so Moonie is a nice change. I used to walk a girl grey called Moon due to the crescent shape on her nose.

 

I imagine a crate for traveling is safer in case of a crash but many opt to use car harness to secure on the back seat instead or nothing as above poster.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest normaandburrell

I have never crated my greys, but when I brought them home I did have a second person in the car to monitor the dog. Usually the adoption group will tell you what you need. You can also go on line to other adoption groups web sites and get ideas. However, I'll tell you what I think are basics.

Unless the adoption group is loaning you a crate to keep him in when you first get him, make sure you get a baby gate so you can restrict him to a small area in the house until he is used to being in a home. You probably want to let him sleep in the same room with you.

In addition to a sturdy leash and a martingale collar, you also should have a sighthound muzzle, sometimes called a basket muzzle. It is different from the cloth muzzles you see in most pet stores. You might want to muzzle him at first when you leave the house, until you are certain he will not chew.

Be aware that some greyhounds will bolt the minute they are off leash. When bringing him home, do not open the car door until you have him on leash and securely under control. Most US adoption groups require that you agree to never allow a greyhound off leash in an unfenced area.

You also want to have raised bowls for food and water, and a bed, two if you don't want to be dragging the bed from the living area into the bedroom and back every day. Most greys want to be where you are, and they will not lie for long on a hard floor.

There is a lot of information online from various adoption groups. If your group doesn't give you a handbook to read, look online. Congratulations on your new boy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I first got my hounds (one at a time), I didn't have an SUV, just a Nissan Sentra. I picked up my first hound alone and she did greyt riding in the back seat during the 30-minute ride home, very calm. Again arriving alone, my second hound was a terrible passenger--she was very stressed and kept trying to get into the front seat. I had to stop several times to get her into the back seat. After that, I bungee corded a metal barrier (the divider in a large dog crate worked perfectly) between the front and back seats and that worked fine, and then I removed the back seat and folded down the backs so it was flat and that worked even better. Now I have a Nissan Cube, and she rides nicely way back in the cargo area since I only have one hound now (two wouldn't fit in that space). Congratulations and best of luck with your new hound!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:welcome2

I have a midsized SUV (4Runner), and while it does fit "a" crate, I currently have 3 girls. So no I don't transport them in crates. Yes that is the safest method, but I've never done it. I've also have gone on lots of GURs and never did they ask for the dogs to be crated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest sireltonsmom

Congrats on your blue boy! I would reinforce what others have said about reading up on the breed and add to get a vet who is familiar with greyhounds. They take much less anesthesia than other breeds. Their bloodwork is slightly different as well. Please put tape on glass doors or mirrors at his eye level. You don't want him running into them. I can't stress the leash requirement enough. They can reach 43+ mph in just a few strides. I recommend a thin house collar to hold tags. It's not good to leave the martingale collar on inside. Have your adoption folks show you the correct tightness for the collar. If it's too loose, since their necks and heads are about the same width, they can back out of it. I get a lot of pleasure from walking my dogs on leash. You meet fun people. Enjoy your Moonie. Greyhounds are awesome!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lots of good advice above. Pay attention to the type of leash provided. It won't be a retractable one. Retractable leashes are not recommended -- and with my group its use is prohibited by the adoption contract -- for use with a Greyhound. Actually, most if not all of us think they're bad for any dog for many reasons, but they are definitely dangerous to use with a Grey.

 

The recommendation you saw on the news about a crate probably relates to safety. It is definitely safer to have dogs, as well as people of course, secure in a car. If there's an accident, an unsecured dog can easily get hurt and/or become a projectile. Unfortunately, it's often not practical to use doggie seat belts on a dog. Honestly, I can't imagine how I'd use one with Annie.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Moonie12

Thanks everyone so much! For some reason I was getting an error 503 and couldn't log on for a couple days. I did talk to the director if the rescue group and I do get a martingale collar, leash, muzzle and all paperwork including blood work that she said to keep with me at all times. I'm so relieved to hear I don't have to crate him to bring him home! I have a kennel already for him for when I'm not home. The home visit in tomorrow so if all goes as planned I will pick him up next weekend! Thanks again for the feedback!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...