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Cat Chasing Question


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My grey has been with me a week. 99% of the time, he ignores the cats and all of us are usually always in the same room. A few times this week, he has chased one of my cats. When he catches up he doesn't do anything. I corrected him with a firm "NO" today. He gave me a look and layed down in the other room for 30min. Man did I feel bad! Is this just to be expected? He usually is fine and even sleeps in the same room, while the cats are nearby. Maybe he is getting more comfortable with me and just wants to play? He was very anxious the first few daya

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What was the cat doing when your boy started chasing? If the cat was running or otherwise being a PITA (which cats can totally be with dogs!), then I would probably correct the dog, give the cat a time out, and move on. If he had wanted to catch the cat, he would have.

 

BUT - at only a week in, it may be too soon to know for sure how he is with cats. For safety's sake I would not leave them together unsupervised at this point.

Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

35764734494_93de5b5963_b.jpg

Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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This is common practice at our home with three dogs and three cats. Our cats get to playing and running around the house and one of the gh's goes for the cat just because she wants to be part of the playing. Perhaps that is what it is for your pup too.

gallery_19161_3282_5037.jpg

 

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Guest shadow

Thanks for the replies. I agree its still early, so I muzzle him if I step out of the room

 

brandimom, that sounds like whats happening. He walks by my cats a hundred times a day. Sometimes he gets too close and they scurry away. This is when he chases. He does not go for them if he sees them. Should I correct him when he chases?

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Guest Clawsandpaws

I would correct if he chases. When they are running, the adrenaline pumps, you would not want your hound to get to excited even if they are just "playing," a playful snap could be fatal to Mr. Whiskers.

 

 

If he only chases them when they run, that would be a red flag for me. As when they run he could be viewing them as prey. I would keep doing what you're doing, muzzle and crate when not at home. He may just need to get over the excitement of those strange looking furry friends.

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You are doing the right thing by not allowing your new Greyhound to chase the cats. Ever. Running cats can look like prey, or live play toys to hounds whether during week one, or year ten - if hound is allowed to chase them. Neither of which are a positive result for the cats.

 

Greyhounds are much faster runners than cats (or humans). Please keep your hound muzzled whenever your hound is out of his crate, and for longer than you think he needs it (even if you are in the same room). It might be weeks, or months until he truly views your cats as part of his family member pack.

 

Most Greyhounds arrive understanding the word "no". Also good to eventually begin adding "leave it" (which they usually don't know until you begin teaching it).

 

Do you have a tall baby-gate installed? If not, installing a tall baby-gate 5"- 6" above floor level is highly recommended, so your cats have an escape route into other safe rooms.

 

Important to provide one completely safe "cat only" room, so the cats can retreat to sleep undisturbed where the hound can't reach them.

 

Great to keep some large furniture (sofa, etc.) pulled several inches away from walls in rooms most frequented by the family, so the cats have other quick get-away zones, away from the dog. (Allow just enough space for cat to turn around.)

 

Great if your cats live "indoors only". If not, avoid allowing your hound outside whenever cats are in your yard. Outside environment = game on. Some dogs may seem like they're only playing, but can harm a cat by snagging it like a toy, or prey, or pouncing on it with it's legs.

 

Other than the cats running, it sounds like things are going fairly well so far. Enjoy your new hound! :)

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Guest shadow

Great thank you. Anytime I leave the room, he is muzzled. When I leave the house, he is crated. The cats live indoor only and have the basement all to themselves (via a catdoor). That is where they sleep actually. At night, I have ny grey on the floor of my bedroom, door closed, with a babygate on the otherside of my door. Just in case my 4yr old wakes up, bursts in my room and gives him a fright. Trying to cover all grounds!

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Good thinking re: the baby-gate and your child bursting in the bedroom. :)

 

Just want to reiterate that dogs are often silent and can move faster than a human, so during these early weeks, I would encourage you to keep hound's muzzle on even when you are in the same room whenever the cats are moving freely in the house.

 

I imagine you already know this, but since you have a young child also. Just want to mention the golden rule: Please don't let anyone disturb your Greyhound when he is lying down resting on his bed or elsewhere on the floor. This includes bending over to pet him. It's safest to wait for the Greyhound to stand up before anyone (adult or child) gives him attention. Greys are used to sleeping in their own private space without being disturbed. Also, many Greyhounds sleep with their eyes open, so best to let resting dogs lie. :)

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Good point 3greys and very true. I drill it into my daughter's head not to disturb dogs when they eat, sleep, or to touch their toys.

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Guest grey_dreams

The dog should never have any opportunity whatsoever to chase the cat, especially at such an early stage as you are in (only a week or so). A muzzled dog can kill a cornered cat. I have a cat and have had multiple dogs come through the house. Each new dog lives tethered to me (24/7, or if I can't directly supervise, then in a crate) with a leash for at least the first few days, and tethered + muzzle for at least the first day, until I can carefully assess how they view the cat with all the cat behaviors - running, playing, sleeping, eating. If the dogs shows any interest in the cat, I redirect and praise. I never let the dog off the leashed tether until I am pretty sure they won't chase even if the cat is running and playing. I also keep the tether at night while sleeping, because a small animal moving in the dark can spark levels of prey instinct that they might not have during daylight.

 

I don't allow any chasing of the cat. Never.

 

For us, the tether usually came off after only a few days. With our newest family member it was off during the daytime after four days, and during the nighttime after six days. There is a member of the forum who had a dog that required about six weeks on tether or in crate. This initial time of settling into home is important, because it helps the dog understand that the cat is family and has to be respected as part of the family.

Edited by grey_dreams
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Guest shadow

I planned to tether and muzzle too (per the adoption agency's recommendation), but only muzzeled. He did not show any interest in my cats the first few days and all he did was sleep. As he became more comfortable in my house, he started following them. It wasnt really a full blown chase. He has not chased since this post and he does spend a lot of time around them. Fingers crossed. The adoption agency saw him with my cats and think he will be fine

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You are doing the right thing by not allowing your new Greyhound to chase the cats. Ever. Running cats can look like prey, or live play toys to hounds whether during week one, or year ten - if hound is allowed to chase them. Neither of which are a positive result for the cats.

:nod:nod:nod:nod

 

I've had to deal with that kind of probblem the hard way. I thought my last dog had become fine with the cat after about a year. Then one day some relatives visited with their little dogs and they chased the cat, only for my dog Angel to think... noooooooooooooo THIS is how you really catch a cat! She caught it and was shaking it. Fortunately the cat had run into my room and I was able to save the poor thing just seconds from a broken neck.

Dog got locked away in the other room and not even looked at for 4 hours (Time-Outs DO work if they are instant).

Cat got taken to the vet and fortunately only had bruising.

After that Angel was not even allowed to eyeball that cat, it was MY cat, higher in the pack than her now. It's not nice to have to 'demote' a dog that you actually love as a pet so just don't run the risk with your cats.

A friend of mine put up some cat perches on the wall (shelves with carpet stuck on them really) and the cats can jump up their well out of the way of her dogs.

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Great thank you. Anytime I leave the room, he is muzzled.

A week is too soon to not be muzzling if the cat is accessible. I don't say this to scare you, but you should really muzzle ALL THE TIME-or at least for a few weeks or until you can get the chasing totally corrected. It only takes one second. I had a foster who was good with cats 99% of the time. I thought he was fine. Within days of ditching the muzzle, he killed one of my cats. This was after being in our home with perfect cat manners for almost three months. Once the cat is in their mouth, that's the end. Even if you're right there, there is absolutely nothing you can do to stop it. They get in the zone where it's like they can't even hear you. Just a terrible situation to be in, spoken from experience. I will never forgive myself for letting it happen to me.

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Please view this photo of a Greyhound lure. This is what racing Greyhounds are trained to chase at high speed outside.

 

Lure.jpg

Greyhound lure link: http://images.search.yahoo.com/images/view;_ylt=A2KJkP1BoONRhl4ABM2JzbkF;_ylu=X3oDMTFxYm1rN3VoBHNlYwNzcgRzbGsDaW1nBG9pZAMwNzgyOTBmNjI1MWEyZjBkNTI2OWNhZDRmYjY1MjNiNwRncG9zAzE-?back=http%3A%2F%2Fimages.search.yahoo.com%2Fsearch%2Fimages%3F_adv_prop%3Dimage%26va%3Dgreyhound%2Blure%26fr%3Dyfp-t-900-s%26tab%3Dorganic%26ri%3D1&w=504&h=378&imgurl=www.psgreyhounds.org%2FLure.jpg&rurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.psgreyhounds.org%2FCat%2520Safeness.htm&size=20.7KB&name=An+actual+%3Cb%3EGreyhound+%3C%2Fb%3Etraining+%3Cb%3Elure+%3C%2Fb%3Efrom+National+%3Cb%3EGreyhound+%3C%2Fb%3EAssociation+...&p=greyhound+lure&oid=078290f6251a2f0d5269cad4fb6523b7&fr2=&fr=yfp-t-900-s&tt=An+actual+%3Cb%3EGreyhound+%3C%2Fb%3Etraining+%3Cb%3Elure+%3C%2Fb%3Efrom+National+%3Cb%3EGreyhound+%3C%2Fb%3EAssociation+...&b=0&ni=21&no=1&ts=&tab=organic&sigr=11ela8aqc&sigb=13eh2o8rd&sigi=10tg4hhtr&.crumb=DkEjHcFRThA&fr=yfp-t-900-s

 

 

Thousands of Greyhounds live very successfully with cats (our own Greyhound pack included), but we can never be too careful during their adjustment months, and beyond. I encourage you to take all these experienced peoples' responses to heart. (I've received many frantic calls about cats who met their demise. A baby-gate and muzzle, or crate, or dog leashed to human could have helped saved these cats' lives. People were home in these cases.)

 

Revisiting the baby-gate topic. If you don't have an extra gate, I encourage you to add another tall baby-gate (installed 6" above floor level) in the room where you and your Greyhound spend the most time during the day. (Example: If you spend most time in the family room and kitchen, add a baby-gate in that doorway (or the next room's doorway), so hound is enclosed in one or two rooms. That will stop your new hound from being able to chase the cats too far, and will give the cats a much better chance to escape if a brief chase. Bonus that it will help ease housetraining, etc.

(BTW, there are baby-gates with built-in cat doors. Just my opinion: I prefer 6" above floor installation. The cats have a much wider escape route (full width of human doorway); plus, it increases the height of the gate to help deter a hound from jumping over.

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Sounds like you're doing a super job!!!! Keep up the good work - and keep asking questions! Things will change next week, and the next. This is a big adjustment time - so keep asking for help, and advice. There are a LOT of clever people on GT, that have been there/done that. Getting real-time feedback is going to be crucial to your household right now.

 

If you have setbacks - don't be afraid to post them. We've ALL had them. We can help you get through them and keep minor setbacks from turning into big issues.

 

BTW - I don't know a darn thing about greys and cats.

 

But I DO know - the BEST grey owners - are the ones that ask a LOT of questions!!!!

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