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Going For A Ride.


Guest iMrCrumbs
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Guest iMrCrumbs

Is anyone else having this issue?

Everytime I take Dillon out to potty, he heads straight for the car. He LOVES going for rides and I take him from time to time... But as soon as we walk outside, he makes a dash for the car. How can I make rides more of a reward so that he doesn't exhibit this behavior?

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I'm confused by your question. If you make it more of a reward, won't he want to go riding that much more? Or are you asking how to make the ride itself a reward for doing something good? Or am I asking the same question? LOL Either way, does it matter if he runs to the car? Also, I assume he's on a leash so just keep the leash short with Dillon close to you so he can't do anything but walk by your leg. That will keep him from rushing anything.

Edited by Feisty49
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Tracker does that, too. He'll walk towards the car, then stand by the back door and longingly look inside. But I just call his name and walk past the car towards the road. If he balks, I gently pull on the leash until he starts moving. Never seems to be a problem.

 

Feisty489, I have the same confusion.

Edited by christinepi
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Beth too looks hopefully towards the car if it's visible or we head near the open garage door. But since she's on leash it isn't an issue. Hey, having a dog who loves rides is much better than the opposite problem.

 

iMrCrumb, you said something in your intro post about being on a farm and having a lot of space. Is Dillon not on leash when he is making this "dash" for the car? That's something virtually all of us here would find deeply worrisome with a greyhound outside a fenced area, certainly a new greyhound.

 

If he's on leash and is just pulling hard towards the car, what you have is a leash-manners issue. When he tries to dash, turn and walk him in the opposite direction for a little way, then head back but turn around again if he starts to pull -- basically, do not let him go on the walk or pass/approach the car until he is willing to walk calmly without pulling. A good obedience class using positive reinforcement would help you work on this as well as other things you're interested in like tricks, using a clicker, etc. Dillon sounds very smart and he will pick stuff up fast.

Edited by PrairieProf

With Cocoa (DC Chocolatedrop), missing B for Beth (2006-2015)
And kitties C.J., Klara, Bernadette, John-Boy, & Sinbad

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One of mine will try to go to every car, truck, etc., that we might pass on our walk. :omg She doesn't really like walking.

:lol so will mine. If someone has their door open they'll pull to try and go get in and if my car is in the drive way they will try and head toward it. I just say "no ride" and they get the hint.

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Guest iMrCrumbs

Dillon is on a leash and does really well on it. The only time that he sees my car is when we start our walk to go out to the fields. I am going to try what you suggested about walking him away from it and saying no ride. I am picking a clicker up today and I am going to start working with him.

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Guest iMrCrumbs

I'm confused by your question. If you make it more of a reward, won't he want to go riding that much more? Or are you asking how to make the ride itself a reward for doing something good? Or am I asking the same question? LOL Either way, does it matter if he runs to the car? Also, I assume he's on a leash so just keep the leash short with Dillon close to you so he can't do anything but walk by your leg. That will keep him from rushing anything.

 

I am wanting to make the ride itself a reward for being good and not messing the house while I am at work. :)

I want him to know when I say "Let's go for a ride" that he know's what to do... Instead of going to the car every time he sees the car.

Edited by iMrCrumbs
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Guest Wasserbuffel
I want him to know when I say "Let's go for a ride" that he know's what to do... Instead of going to the car every time he sees the car.

 

Choose a different phrase for each activity. Say something like "Walk time" when you're just walking, take him out and bypass the car completely each and every time. Say "Let's go for a ride", or "Wanna go for a ride?", when you leave for a ride. If you're consistent with the cues, he should learn in time which activity he's about to do.

 

Just make sure the two phrases don't being the same way. E.g.( "Wanna ride?" and "wanna walk?").

Edited by Jayne
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Sammi loves traveling. Be it across 3 states, across town, or across the street.

 

She knows, tho, that she cannot get in the car for a ride until she potties, so when we go outside, she ignores the car to do her business.

 

It's after she is done that she is trying to drag me to the car (except when scared, the only time she has bad leash manners is when trying to give me the subtle hint about the car)

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I'm confused by your question. If you make it more of a reward, won't he want to go riding that much more? Or are you asking how to make the ride itself a reward for doing something good? Or am I asking the same question? LOL Either way, does it matter if he runs to the car? Also, I assume he's on a leash so just keep the leash short with Dillon close to you so he can't do anything but walk by your leg. That will keep him from rushing anything.

 

I am wanting to make the ride itself a reward for being good and not messing the house while I am at work. :)

I want him to know when I say "Let's go for a ride" that he know's what to do... Instead of going to the car every time he sees the car.

 

He'll learn what the words mean because you'll use them often enough. My girl knows when I say, "Let's go for a walk," we're walking. She knows when I say, "Let's go for a ride in the car," that we're going for a ride in the car. As far as the ride being a reward for not messing the house, I don't think he'll associate the two. There's no connection because the time frame involved is hours long and he has no idea that he's done something good. It's not like him coming to you when called and you immediately give him a food reward.

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

I'm confused by your question. If you make it more of a reward, won't he want to go riding that much more? Or are you asking how to make the ride itself a reward for doing something good? Or am I asking the same question? LOL Either way, does it matter if he runs to the car? Also, I assume he's on a leash so just keep the leash short with Dillon close to you so he can't do anything but walk by your leg. That will keep him from rushing anything.

 

I am wanting to make the ride itself a reward for being good and not messing the house while I am at work. :)

I want him to know when I say "Let's go for a ride" that he know's what to do... Instead of going to the car every time he sees the car.

 

Your dog is not a person. He will never understand that he will get a car ride if he is "good" while you are gone. If you have elimination issues, then you have other issues to address...

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I am wanting to make the ride itself a reward for being good and not messing the house while I am at work. :)

I want him to know when I say "Let's go for a ride" that he know's what to do... Instead of going to the car every time he sees the car.

The second goal is obtainable - he can learn "go for ride" fairly easily.

 

The first goal, not so much. There is no way he can connect not messing in the house all day with being rewarded by a car ride. He's done a million things while you're gone and doesn't know if he's being rewarded for not messing, barking at the mailman, playing with a toy or sleeping. :blink: The reward has to follow the desired action.

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Guest iMrCrumbs

I'm confused by your question. If you make it more of a reward, won't he want to go riding that much more? Or are you asking how to make the ride itself a reward for doing something good? Or am I asking the same question? LOL Either way, does it matter if he runs to the car? Also, I assume he's on a leash so just keep the leash short with Dillon close to you so he can't do anything but walk by your leg. That will keep him from rushing anything.

 

I am wanting to make the ride itself a reward for being good and not messing the house while I am at work. :)

I want him to know when I say "Let's go for a ride" that he know's what to do... Instead of going to the car every time he sees the car.

 

Your dog is not a person. He will never understand that he will get a car ride if he is "good" while you are gone. If you have elimination issues, then you have other issues to address...

 

 

WooHoo look at the quotes!

 

There are no elimination issues.. And I am fully aware that Dillon is a dog lol.. HOWEVER if I just looked at him and treated his as a dog, what kind of Greyhound lover would I be? To me he is family. He eats the best, is given the best of everything and most importantly he gets the best of me.

 

I am wanting to make the ride itself a reward for being good and not messing the house while I am at work. :)

I want him to know when I say "Let's go for a ride" that he know's what to do... Instead of going to the car every time he sees the car.

The second goal is obtainable - he can learn "go for ride" fairly easily.

 

The first goal, not so much. There is no way he can connect not messing in the house all day with being rewarded by a car ride. He's done a million things while you're gone and doesn't know if he's being rewarded for not messing, barking at the mailman, playing with a toy or sleeping. :blink: The reward has to follow the desired action.

 

So there is no way to associate me coming and him being good while I was gone as Good Behavior? Maybe im not wording this right... ??? :tomato

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So there is no way to associate me coming and him being good while I was gone as Good Behavior? Maybe im not wording this right... ??? :tomato

 

Unfortunately, nothing as vague as that is possible. He's going to tie that really good thing with what *immediately* preceded it, not the 8 hours of sleeping all day and not doing anything that you consider "bad." If you asked him to sit, got a sit, and then said "good boy! Car ride!" and took him out, he'd think he was being rewarded only for that sit. I guess you could do that, but the generic "you've been a good boy all day long while I was gone" (doing everything, or, since he's a greyhound, every *nothing* that you did today) "so you get a reward" is a highly advanced concept. Dogs just don't get that level of cognition. A lot of people don't seem to have that level of cognition....

Edited by Fruitycake
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Well, imagine it this way: you're sitting at home for hours, reading a book for hours on end, occasionally getting yourself a snack, and then looking out the window, and your spouse comes home and gushes all over you and cooks you this great meal without saying a word (interesting concept): how would you have a clue as to which part of what you were doing (or not) she's treating you so nicely for?

 

It's next to impossible to reward for the absence of something. Even for humans that would be a feat. And, as other posters have said, dogs live so much in the moment that something they did even seconds ago is already gone from their mind. Not to mention something they didn't do.

 

I think rewarding him whenever he's eliminating appropriately (doing something as opposed to not doing something) is the much smarter way to go.

Edited by christinepi
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Guest Angelique

One of mine will try to go to every car, truck, etc., that we might pass on our walk. :omg She doesn't really like walking.

Same here. Any car with an open door is an invitation. I have had many people look at me strangely because he will pull us towards and is about to *jump into* their car. My boy would be so happy ridding in a car all day, everyday. Maybe i should become a trucker... :dunno

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Maybe i should become a trucker... :dunno

I actually adopted out a greyhound that we traced back to Bluffs Run. He was originally adopted by a long haul trucker and his family. They later gave him to another trucker and from what we were told the grey spent a few years on the road with his Dad, sometimes showering with him in truck stop showers.

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Guest kkaiser104

Teddi's the same way. I've been working on desensitizing him to the sound of my car keys--he used to get bent out of shape when I so much as picked them up! Now he only gets upset 50% of the time and the other 50% he doesn't even get out of bed.

 

I agree with all of the comments about saying "want to go for a ride?" when you're going, and "let's go on a walk" (or something similar) for when you're walking. Teddi knows that if I tell him to "go potty outside" he's going to go potty, and we always go back in the house before going in the car. He still pulls me towards the car sometimes, but it's easily correctable.

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And I am fully aware that Dillon is a dog lol.. HOWEVER if just looked at him and treated his as a dog, what kind of Greyhound lover would I be? To me he is family. He eats the best, is given the best of everything and most importantly he gets the best ....

 

Your dog can be "family" and receive the best nutrition and medical care and still be treated like a dog. There is nothing wrong with a dog being treated like a dog. In fact it is healthy.

 

I love Summit to pieces. He gets what I consider the best nutrition and best medical care. I take him places to provide him socialization and enrichment. I train him and give him mentally challenging toys. I do love on him and give him affection. We even allow him on our furniture. But we still treat him like a dog at the end of the day. He is expected to lay on his bed and not beg for food while we are eating. He is expected to listen and obey my commands. He is not expected to do anything a dog shouldn't reasonably do which I might expect of a human child.

 

Just because you think of him as what he is (a dog) doesn't mean he isn't an important member of the family, or that you don't provide him with the best life possible, or that you are a bad greyhound fanatic. In fact I think it shows just the opposite. :)

Kristie and the Apex Agility Greyhounds: Kili (ATChC AgMCh Lakilanni Where Eagles Fly RN IP MSCDC MTRDC ExS Bronze ExJ Bronze ) and Kenna (Lakilanni Kiss The Sky RN MADC MJDC AGDC AGEx AGExJ). Waiting at the Bridge: Retired racer Summit (Bbf Dropout) May 5, 2005-Jan 30, 2019

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Guest Angelique

emily used to love the car and if she saw a van or heard a diesel motor ideling she was up and ready to go! she had been hauled all over the country- raced in ct, fl, tx and then some. the best traveler ever!

Just to show how much they love racing.

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