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Walking Your Dog?


Guest Blaze
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We've had Blaze and Hannah for three, almost four years and love them to pieces. So sweet, wound't trade either of them for nothin'. Now that big one, Blaze has a huge prey instinct and it is really annoying. I walk them with a great deal of regularity. I like it and they like it. but I am thinking now, that, while I like it as a social dog/human activity where I get a little exercise, I think Blaze likes it as an opportunity to hunt. He is on constant alert, excited and nervous - looking for prey. The problem is always when the owner of a small dog thinks it dosn't need to be on lesh and it comes at us. So we're back to a muzzel on our walks. But - shesh! why am I walking them? Is it enough to let them run in the back yard? We have a 1/2 acre and they have access to it all the time, still when I get home we go out and they course it as a routine - less than five minutes and they are beat. Is it just as well to skip the walking?

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Do not muzzle your dog on your walk. He will be unable to defend himself if attacked by another dog.

 

I carry Halts 2 dog repellent spray and am not afraid to use it on a charging dog. Being in Illinois I am limited as to what i can legally carry on my person. When we move, I will be increasing my "fire power" to something much more lethal.

 

There are numerous threads on this subject on the site with people listing the things they carry and what actions they take regarding loose dogs. Try searching for "off leash" in quotes or the word "attacked" in the search function and you will find a great deal of information that may help.

 

If the off leash dog is a continual problem, you need to address it through available channels, whether that's your HOA, Animal Control or the Police for the sake of your dogs, as well as the off leash dog who will ultimately end up the victim of having an idiot for an owner.

 

Hope you can get it resolved so your pups can still take their walks unprovoked. Good luck.

Edited by Time4ANap
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Camp Broodie. The current home of Mark Kay Mark Jack and LaVida I've Got Life.  Always missing my boy Rocket Hi Noon Rocket,  Allie  Phoenix Dynamite, Kate Miss Kate, Starz Under Da Starz, Petunia MW Neptunia and Diva Astar Dashindiva 

 

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I have the same problem with Brees. She spends all of our walking time looking for something to kill. With Brees, she'll want to chase anything little and quiet. Barking small dogs are scary. After reading your post, I feel very lucky! I would feel horrible if she hurt/killed/ate someone's little dog, but if the little one isn't on a leash, and Brees is (she always is!), I think we'd be ok legally.

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They still benefit from (not a definite requirement) the mental stimulation that comes from going on a walk and you will benefit from the exercize and change of scenery.

Peggy on a leash has prey drive for cats and squirrels but as both tend to run away (except the odd extremely stupid cat that thinks it's a Tiger) the problem is quickly over. If she doesn't like a dog approaching she gives a deep woof-woof bark and it then keeps its distance.

If you're going to want to muzzle everywhere then carry a walking stick to fend off loose dogs; I've got an alumium one that folds into my coat pocket (there is an elastic cord down the middle). It's very quick to shake out and makes a formidable prodding weapon.

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I would imagine all the sniffing of other animals (dogs, cats, birds, wildlife) and various scents that change over time are a necessity for dogs' mental stimulation. They seem to truly live through their noses. Maybe it's comparable to a situation in which humans, who take in their world through their eyes, had to live in dim light or near darkness all the time and couldn't see or make out much--just look at how those Scandinavians take to the bottle! (no offense to any Scandinavians)

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thanks for the replies and advise. I never thought about arming myself before going out but that is a good idea. More to carry, though and with two dogs and a bag of poop, my hands are pretty full. :flip

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Guest Wasserbuffel

Loose dogs are a nuisance that most of us have to deal with. Carrying a spray or stick is a great idea. Sometimes just stepping in front of your dogs and yelling for the little yapper to go home is enough.

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Guest AceyGrey

This happens quite often with my Ace, he remembers exactly where he has seen a cat before and looks and won't move until he is absolutely sure there is no cat there.

In terms of small dogs, Ace thinks they are things to chase and its so hard to stop him sometimes (he's so powerful) this is made worse by the fact that lots of people in my local area have small dogs which are very rarely leashed.

I stopped walking Ace with a muzzle after a Jack Russel attempted to attack him! This small dog literally ran at him and without even sniffing at him growled and snapped at his legs, while its owner did little to resolve the situation.

I also found that small dogs and in fact most dogs were more aggressive towards him because he had the muzzle on.

Since walking without a muzzle small dog aggression is very uncommon.

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Guest 2GreytsMom

You know what else is really scary? Those yards with the invisible fence and a charging, barking, crazy dog in the yard!

People think that because they have those fences that it's OK to let their maniac dogs just run wild on their own lawns... completely forgetting that it's not keeping out the passing dogs!!

There's a family on my block that just leaves their pup in the front yard unsupervised and it charges the boundaries and scares the crap out of me & one of my hounds!

One of these days, I fear that a loose aggressive dog or one on leash that gets away is going to attack that pup!!

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Guest KennelMom

I think walking is important - even though ours have a full fenced acre. Ours don't get walked anymore w/the heat of summer and the baby and I can see a definitely change in them...they miss it and I miss it. Hopefully we'll be back to walks soon! We have several VERY VERY VERY high prey hunters, but that's no reason they can't learn to behave politely and properly on a leash. I usually walk 4 at a time and they all know LEAVE IT! We live out in the country and frequently encounter wildlife plus the odd farm/yard dog that ventures out loose.

 

eta: I would never walk with my dogs muzzled. Major safety concern, IMO.

Edited by KennelMom
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I walk both f mine muzzled. I's the law here. One ox medium prey drive, the other has learned leash reactivity. I'm having some success with lots and lots of treats when we see other dogs. What seems to be happening is that the prey drive is being redirected towards the treats and the act of chewing seems to calm PK down. Mine also walk for at least an hour in the morning and nearly the same in the evening as I believe that its important to get them out seeing different things.

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Now wait a minute. Let me get this straight. You're thinking of cutting out an activity that you and your dogs enjoy - because of other people who are irresponsible, and the fear that your dog might react badly if one of those small dogs gets too close? That doesn't make sense to me. You have the RIGHT to go for a walk!

 

I've always had high-prey dogs. And yes, sometimes it seems like they enjoy the sniffing and following scents and the excitement of seeing a rabbit or deer more than their walk. But, I could always get them to "move along". Heck, there's nothing wrong with a dog getting excited about seeing a prey animal - we live in the country, we see LOTS. If you can break the focus and move on.

 

Now, I can't keep rabbits and such from crossing my path - but dogs with owners - that CAN be dealt with. If you can - avoid where the small dogs live. Are you walking in your neighborhood? You'll know where they live. When you do encounter them - turn around and walk away. If the owner is around - yell over your shoulder that they NEED to RESTRAIN THEIR DOG. Don't be afraid to tell them that your dog WILL BITE their dog if it approaches - and you are NOT liable.

 

I had one person tell me that "my Chi is just being friendly" (as it was jumping on my tightly-restrained grey) and I responded that "your dog is RUDE, not friendly, and you are STUPID for putting your dog in that much danger. If I give my dog an inch of slack he will EAT YOUR DOG". We never had THAT problem again. And yes - she told people that my dog was viscous, and I was rude. Oh well. I made my point and kept HER dog safe.

 

BTW - a muzzle will not keep your dog from seriously injuring a small animal if it gets ahold of it. Heck, a grey attacking a tiny dog could seriously injure it by pinning it down with its paws.

Edited by sobesmom
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Another option is to carry a riding crop. If you've ever been hit accidently with one you know it hurts. Hit a dog on the nose and my experieince is it will turn tail and go home. I love walking with my dogs and we do avoid some streets b/c of other animals, but there are plenty of other streets to walk down.

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