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Greyhounds In The Heat


Guest kahjul
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Guest kahjul

I had read a lot about greys not handling the cold well, but the heat seems to be worse for us. Derby gets very hot when she plays or goes for walks. Sometimes if we're playing in the yard-even when its 40 or so-she'll get panty and go lay in her kiddie pool. I finally just gave up worrying about that. Now that we're getting into much warmer weather, our nightly walks seem to be doing her in. We ahve been walking 3-5 miles 3 or 4 times a week in the evenings forever. When it was super cold, windy and rainy, a light fleece jacket was fine. We walk in the evenings, so it's been 75-80 degrees. She is just tuckered out about halfway through, brings up the rear for the last half and lays in her pool (I guess trying to get her temp down) for about 15 minutes when we get home. Do I need to leave her home for the spring/summer or is there something I can do to help keep her cool? Wet bandana around the neck?? Any suggestions appreciated-she loves to go with us.

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Guest greyarea

We notice the same with Lucy and Molly. We got Lucy first (after having a Collie mix) and noticed immediately that she balked at 2-3 mile walks that our collie mix had handled with ease. Molly is the same way - sometimes she even sits down if she's walked too long. In Central Florida, we have to be careful during the summer! Seems these dogs are great sprinters, but lack stamina for longer walks. We've adjusted our outings accordingly. We have seen some products - wet terrys or bandanas but mostly we've shortened our walks and started/ended them with hose downs. It does seem they have a narrow window of comfort!

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Guest meakah

Koda doesn't handle the heat well either and we don't get as hot as California very often. I find she is most comfortable right around 0 give or take about 5 degrees. When it is warmer out, I always hose her down numerous times throughout the day. As soon as she sees me near the hose she 'assumes position'. :P She LOVES it! A kiddie pool is a good thing to have available all summer too. When it is really warm out, I walk in the early mornings or late night only. I guess all in all...my best tactic is the hosing....her entire body including head. It really makes her cool down and feel good.

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Guest Energy11

I know what you mean! Mine lag behind on our walks, even in the high 60s/low 70s. They take after me. I HATE this warm weather, so soon. None of us have had time to get used to it, which I think is part of the problem.

 

I'd shorten up the walks, and maybe do the wet bandana thing, to keep them cool.

 

Summer will be here before we know it. UGH!

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Guest kydie

do any of you think this could be the humid areas you are in?

It is never REAL hot here, or humid, once in awhile, but it is 70 to 75, not humid, and we walk with no problems, summer, late evening, or very early a.m. if it get 80 we think we are in heaven :lol

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I noticed ours get more tired and panty when it's warm and humid more so than when it's hot and not so humid, if that makes sense. IOW, it's the humidity, not the heat, that causes more problems.

 

I've tried the wet bandanna thing but the bandanna gets warmed up pretty fast, so I gave up on that. Staying in the shade helps us some.

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Here in the desert, the heat is brutal and can be very dangerous in a very short time if outdoors.

 

I'm not sure where in Ca you are, but please be careful, even in the shade.

 

If you evenings and early mornings cool down, that's when I would do any walking.

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Guest kahjul

She does have a kiddie pool year round, and we do walk in the evenings-at almost dark, so it's cooled down some. I'll try hosing her down before we go-I've done that with horses, don't know why I didn't think of it for her. I'm in central CA, by the coast, but it still gets over 100 in the summer. Right now, we're seeing high 70's in the afternoons.

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Here in the desert, the heat is brutal and can be very dangerous in a very short time if outdoors.

 

I'm not sure where in Ca you are, but please be careful, even in the shade.

 

If you evenings and early mornings cool down, that's when I would do any walking.

 

Agreed. If your area gets hotter than she can stand, she'll need early morning/late evening walks, and even then she may not be able to do miles. Maybe cut her walks short in the hot weather? Heat stroke can kill these dogs.

 

 

She does have a kiddie pool year round, and we do walk in the evenings-at almost dark, so it's cooled down some. I'll try hosing her down before we go-I've done that with horses, don't know why I didn't think of it for her. I'm in central CA, by the coast, but it still gets over 100 in the summer. Right now, we're seeing high 70's in the afternoons.

 

Well, the pool will certainly help, and maybe the hosing too, if she can take it. Can you do it with less-than-ice-cold water? That would be best. Otherwise a cool-down coat might work for her. Terry cloth, which you can spray with cool water, or a hi-tech one. Sounds like she looooves her pool, anyway!

 

Certainly, I wouldn't take my dogs more than a few hundred yards in 100 degrees. And some deal less well with the heat than others.

 

I wonder if it would be worth taking her temperature when she is showing signs of heat stress, to get a handle on just how she's doing physiologically?

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Guest Energy11

We are having high 70s/80 the next few days. We walked ours at 10:30, and they heated up quickly. So did I ... :-(

 

Anyway, we don't have to walk ours ... they have two turnout pens, one small, one large, but we like to give them exercise. With it being almost 20 degrees above normal tomorrow, we will either walk early, or late in the evening, OR, not at all. My rule of thumb is, if I am hot, they are too. I DO feel the heat, but, so do the greys.

 

Just be careful, and walk during cooler times, and shorter walks. They do get a kick out of those wading pools, too! I had two in Florida for mine!

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I used to do parades too but I wouldn't do it if he temp is supposed to get above 75. The asphalt must get awfully hot on their feet. But as Dee says, if she's hot, the dogs probably are too.

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Guest kahjul

I took a water bottle this morning and soaked her at the halfway point. She perked right up and was a handful for the last half. I'll continue to do it this way until its too hot for her. I walk to keep my weight down, so shortening the walk won't work for me. Where we walk is a bit hilly, but totally shaded. My lab also needs it for her weight :lol and she can handle miles, even in the heat. I don't like to go without the dogs, I feel they offer some protection since I'm alone, but when it gets too warm, Derby will just have to stay home with daddy and an antler.

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

Yes these dogs are great sprinters, but not long distance endurance hounds. They can be conditioned for long distance walks, just like any other athlete, they need to train for the distance. As others have said, be aware of the temp, and adjust your walks accordingly. Also, be aware of the signs of overheating (I am not a vet, so I am not going to post all the symptoms, do a google search). One thing to note though, to cool them off quickly, you need to put water in their thigh regions (this is the area between their rear legs where the main artery runs). Also the chest is another place that will quickly cool them down.

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Only helpful hint I have is that give her some ice to chomp on to make sure she is hydrated. I know Lexie doesn't drink a lot in the heat but she does love the ice cubes.

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Guest sheila

JMO but a 3-5 mile walk is probably more than my greyhounds could handle on any given day. My senior gal is good for about 1-1.5 miles and she starts dragging. My teenage boy could probably go 3 miles, but he'd be done by then.

The suggestions I could offer would be to shorten Derbys walk by arranging the route so you can drop her off at home midway while the rest of you finish your walk. (I've done this when my older gal is pooping out and my teenager is still full of energy). The other suggestion would be to pack some water and maybe a cookie for Derby and schedule a 10-15 minute break 1/2 way through the walk so she can get the wind under her sails again.

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Guest Spencers_Greyt

Mine don't transition into summer well here either. I would cut down the length of your walks until they get accustomed to the warmer weather. Right now it's been in the 80's outside and somewhere below that inside and Spencer is just panting up a storm and whining a lot. He does this every time when Spring starts turning into Summer. Just takes some acclimating I think.

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Guest Energy11

FORGET parades in the late spring/summer, UNLESS you and the houndies are riding on floats!

 

And, yes, as the OPs have said, if you are hot, the hounds are hot!

 

My AC is on right now ... FYI. ... I would keep the walks SHORT, and the hound, cool!

 

Buckle down, folks ... I fear a HOTTTT summer! angryfire.gif

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I noticed last year for the first time Fletcher really felt the heat. Molly didn't seem to be as affected, but I pretty much stopped walking them if the temp was 80 or above. I also shortened the walk. Fletcher turned 7 last year, in early March, I don't know if age is a factor, it might be. I noticed last week the same signs, and I think Dee is right, it's going to be a hot summer.

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Guest Energy11

I noticed last year for the first time Fletcher really felt the heat. Molly didn't seem to be as affected, but I pretty much stopped walking them if the temp was 80 or above. I also shortened the walk. Fletcher turned 7 last year, in early March, I don't know if age is a factor, it might be. I noticed last week the same signs, and I think Dee is right, it's going to be a hot summer.

 

YEP, sad, but true... I do think, and so do our weather people, that is going to be a hottt summer! UGH! We are 20-degrees above normal... YIKES!!! I had to order tank tops today, and it is only March 31 :-(((((

 

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We are 20 degrees above normal (it was 83 today) and both my greyhounds and my westies have been panting away. A few days ago it was in the high 50's and still below freezing at night, so it's a big change for us all. No one likes the heat; I couldn't force mine to go for a walk if I wanted to. Gypsy just lays down and refuses to get up, even if the temp is only low 70's.

 

We used to have a puppy and a 16 year old dog. I would walk the puppy who had tons of energy for a long walk and DH would walk our little ol' lady down the block at night. The puppy and I would make it back around before they would even get past 3 houses. We laugh about it now, but she sure did enjoy her "walks" with us. Maybe you could try this or take them both for just a really short walk, put her back in the cool house and continue on w/ your lab for the longer walk. I know it gets boring having to re-trace part of your walk, but it would probably be the best solution for all of you.smile.gif

 

Connie

 

 

 

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Guest LindsaySF

Yes these dogs are great sprinters, but not long distance endurance hounds. They can be conditioned for long distance walks, just like any other athlete, they need to train for the distance. As others have said, be aware of the temp, and adjust your walks accordingly. Also, be aware of the signs of overheating (I am not a vet, so I am not going to post all the symptoms, do a google search). One thing to note though, to cool them off quickly, you need to put water in their thigh regions (this is the area between their rear legs where the main artery runs). Also the chest is another place that will quickly cool them down.

Agreed. Greyhounds have little insulation so they are prone to over heating. Know what the signs are and keep plenty of cool water with you. In warm weather I walk with a small squirt bottle that way I can spray the undersides of the dogs, and also spray some water into their mouths (they don't always drink from a bowl when we're out and about).

 

When it doubt you could take her temperature rectally, you might be surprised how hot they can get and how quickly.

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