Jump to content

Stop Jumping


Guest charlech
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest charlech

I have a beautiful lively young boy who has never raced, we've had him since he was 6 months, adopted from the rescue that I work with he is now 13 months and we just can't get him to stop jumping up on us. usually when we first come in the door or after we have praised him for something good. It is driving us crazy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest brandi1530

Try to put your knee up in the air when he's trying to jump on you. Mine used to jump on us all the time (and since he's taller than when he's on his hind legs, it was a problem.) We put our knee up whenever he is acting like he wants to jump and he won't jump on us. He still wiggles and bounces, but doesn't actually jump on me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest FrostyBottoms

I have seen Cesar Milan turn his back to jumping dogs...I don't know how successful he would be with a gh puppy tho!

Please post videos...i'm sure it's cute, even though it's driving you crazy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would tell my dogs to sit when I was going to put their leashes on; Otis would sit very nicely and it was easy to put on the leash. Kieran, on the other hand, used to get excited and jump on me. As soon as she started to jump, she was told to sit and I turned my back on her and eventually, she calmed down and I could put the leash on. It took awhile, and now, six years later, she sometimes still tries to jump - I don't say anything, I just turn my back and she sits politely so I can leash her up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Each time your pup jumps on you, immediately turn your back, fold your arms across your chest and remain that way until all 4 paws are on the floor. Your boy will quickly get the idea that jumping doesn't pay.

Irene ~ Owned and Operated by Jenny (Jenny Rocks ~ 11/24/17) ~ JRo, Jenny from the Track

Lola (AMF Won't Forget ~ 04/29/15 -07/22/19) - My girl. I'll always love you.

Wendy (Lost Footing ~ 12/11/05 - 08/18/17) ~ Forever in our hearts. "I am yours, you are mine".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Swifthounds

I agree with the advice to turn your back to a jumping dog. I would not recommend kneeing a dog, but especially not a greyhound who obviously doesn't understand what is expected of him.

 

I've used the method of turning your back in resculpting behavior with all of my greyhounds and nobody jumps on guests or anyone arriving home. The key is usually to simulate someone arriving home and practice. When jumping stops getting him what he wants - attention - and he realizes that only by sitting quietly will he get that attention, he'll stop jumping. The more "active" and engaging the jumpee's response, the more it reinforces for the dog that this is a fun game. (Which is why some of the worst jumpers I've worked with tended to be overexcited dogs whose well-meaning humans had been shoving them off in reaction to the jumping.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest TeddysMom

The only thing that worked with Teddy was putting my knee up, he bumped into it a couple of times and although he still jumps up, thankfully he doesn't actually make contact any longer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please DO NOT use your knee in the dog's chest! You could hurt the dog!

 

Instead, try yelping like a puppy would (as high-pitched as possible), and turn around with your arms crossed. Do not restart the game again until the dog calms down.

 

What you are doing is using canine language. This is how a puppy would tell another puppy the game has gone too far. You have hurt me, and I don't want to play anymore. Once the dog is calm, you can continue playing, or giving attention, conveying to the dog that being calm is the behavior that gets the reward he wants. Chances are, he will learn very quickly!

 

The biggest key is that ALL members of the family must do this EVERY TIME. Consistency is HUGE! One slip, and the door will open again. The dog will think "all I have to do is wait it out! Four times, and they will crack!"

 

Good luck!

Sarah, the human, Henley, and Armani the Borzoi boys, and Brubeck the Deerhound.
Always in our hearts, Gunnar, Naples the Greyhounds, Cooper and Manero, the Borzoi, and King-kitty, at the Rainbow Bridge.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are home, have him drag a leash around and step on the leash if he tries to jump. Do not let him drag a leash if you are not home. Use this mainly when company is coming and don't know how to react. I have seen a jumping dog almost take out a woman holding a newborn. Thankfully, the mom saw the dog running and deflected it. If she hadn't, she could have dropped and severely injured a 2 week old.

Edited by Sambuca
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with the advice to turn your back to a jumping dog. I would not recommend kneeing a dog, but especially not a greyhound who obviously doesn't understand what is expected of him.

 

I've used the method of turning your back in resculpting behavior with all of my greyhounds and nobody jumps on guests or anyone arriving home. The key is usually to simulate someone arriving home and practice. When jumping stops getting him what he wants - attention - and he realizes that only by sitting quietly will he get that attention, he'll stop jumping. The more "active" and engaging the jumpee's response, the more it reinforces for the dog that this is a fun game. (Which is why some of the worst jumpers I've worked with tended to be overexcited dogs whose well-meaning humans had been shoving them off in reaction to the jumping.)

 

I also agree with turning your back. Our Lulu was a notorious jumper...so badly that she would just pummel us with her front paws. She would keep trying to face me after I turned my back, while the whole time pawing at me, but I just kept turning away and giving my back until eventually she would stop. Then I would turn around after a few seconds of quiet and praise her for staying down. This took a while, but eventually worked wonderfully.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tried all of the above and my dog thought I was playing with him and kept jumping. What I finally did was when he jumped I grabbed his collar under his neck and pulled him back down to the floor and said loudly, 'NO JUMPING!' After that I wouldn't pet him or play with him until he behaved appropriately. I think it took about twice for him to figure it out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did you put up with the jumping when he was cute puppy, and now that he's NOT, it's annoying?? Just wondering, 'cause he should have learned this a while ago!

 

Anyway---

 

The old school method was the knee to the chest. Pick up any older training book, and that's what it will tell you to do. It actually DOES work, but some people believe you can hurt the dog, although that's not been my experience. Ignoring him MIGHT work--that did actually work for George--I'd just turn my back on him and ignore him. Now when he jumps, he does not touch me.

 

Another method is to have a helper hold the leash and have you walk through the door. Dog tries to jump, but cannot cause of the leash. The leash won't work if no one is holding it. I can't even visualize how one could step on a leash of dog that's in front of them jumping on them fast enough for it to work!

 

But I helped someone train their Golden Retriever puppy in two sessions. I'd sit with the dog inside, she'd use her key and come in, I just stood there. Puppy would run and jump, leash would catch her and stop her, she gave up quickly!

 

Note: you need a SHORT leash. You don't want the dog to get any speed up, and you don't want to YANK at the dog. Just hold the leash just far enough from the person coming in.


Hamish-siggy1.jpg

Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest charlech

Did you put up with the jumping when he was cute puppy, and now that he's NOT, it's annoying?? Just wondering, 'cause he should have learned this a while ago!

 

Anyway---

 

The old school method was the knee to the chest. Pick up any older training book, and that's what it will tell you to do. It actually DOES work, but some people believe you can hurt the dog, although that's not been my experience. Ignoring him MIGHT work--that did actually work for George--I'd just turn my back on him and ignore him. Now when he jumps, he does not touch me.

 

Another method is to have a helper hold the leash and have you walk through the door. Dog tries to jump, but cannot cause of the leash. The leash won't work if no one is holding it. I can't even visualize how one could step on a leash of dog that's in front of them jumping on them fast enough for it to work!

 

But I helped someone train their Golden Retriever puppy in two sessions. I'd sit with the dog inside, she'd use her key and come in, I just stood there. Puppy would run and jump, leash would catch her and stop her, she gave up quickly!

 

Note: you need a SHORT leash. You don't want the dog to get any speed up, and you don't want to YANK at the dog. Just hold the leash just far enough from the person coming in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest charlech

Did you put up with the jumping when he was cute puppy, and now that he's NOT, it's annoying?? Just wondering, 'cause he should have learned this a while ago!

 

Anyway---

 

The old school method was the knee to the chest. Pick up any older training book, and that's what it will tell you to do. It actually DOES work, but some people believe you can hurt the dog, although that's not been my experience. Ignoring him MIGHT work--that did actually work for George--I'd just turn my back on him and ignore him. Now when he jumps, he does not touch me.

 

Another method is to have a helper hold the leash and have you walk through the door. Dog tries to jump, but cannot cause of the leash. The leash won't work if no one is holding it. I can't even visualize how one could step on a leash of dog that's in front of them jumping on them fast enough for it to work!

 

But I helped someone train their Golden Retriever puppy in two sessions. I'd sit with the dog inside, she'd use her key and come in, I just stood there. Puppy would run and jump, leash would catch her and stop her, she gave up quickly!

 

Note: you need a SHORT leash. You don't want the dog to get any speed up, and you don't want to YANK at the dog. Just hold the leash just far enough from the person coming in.

 

 

When we got him he was just as tall as he is now he is very tall so he never was a small puppy he was 6 month. he came from the rescue and had very little interaction and no training or manners. I tried the knee when we first got him and he had stop some, but he started again after we started our 2nd pre-agility class. He is very fast and sometimes jumps unexpectedly, I'll try the leash trick but he is very stubborn when we are at agility he will shut down if he doesn't like the way things are going on, but he has made some improvements.

 

I agree with the advice to turn your back to a jumping dog. I would not recommend kneeing a dog, but especially not a greyhound who obviously doesn't understand what is expected of him.

 

I've used the method of turning your back in resculpting behavior with all of my greyhounds and nobody jumps on guests or anyone arriving home. The key is usually to simulate someone arriving home and practice. When jumping stops getting him what he wants - attention - and he realizes that only by sitting quietly will he get that attention, he'll stop jumping. The more "active" and engaging the jumpee's response, the more it reinforces for the dog that this is a fun game. (Which is why some of the worst jumpers I've worked with tended to be overexcited dogs whose well-meaning humans had been shoving them off in reaction to the jumping.)

 

I've heard about turning the back to them and I think I will try that first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest charlech

Each time your pup jumps on you, immediately turn your back, fold your arms across your chest and remain that way until all 4 paws are on the floor. Your boy will quickly get the idea that jumping doesn't pay.

I have been doing this since last night, and all morning I can see a difference already. He looks at me like he is so confussed and then trys to walk around to the front of me to see what I am doing. I will keep it up and tell the kids to do the same. I have noticed that he catches on very quickly so maybe this won't take long. Wishful thinking. Thanks for the suggestion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Beaandbucks2mom

About 10 days ago, i posted a similar question regarding my beautiful boy, "Little Buck: He would jump and tug at me when we went for a walk. Someone suggested that I gently give him a little shake at the scruff of his neck (like his canine mother did as a puppy)and say "No" It has worked like a charm. Now someone else warned that you really have to know your dog to do this (i.e, he may bite). But Little Buck still wears his muzzle when we walk so the biting danger is not there.

 

Previously, I swear, I had tried everything for months (like turning my back, putting my knee up ....(which was very unsuccessful many of you will be glad to hear as my timing was completely off)

 

When I do the scruff of his neck, I don't do it hard at all....but enough that he gets the message.

 

Sharon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest AboveTheClouds

I tried turning my back, but all I got was feet in the back. What worked for me was to make sure the dogs were calm before I did anything; get dressed, walks, leashed, fed, affection. Now they know that if they want something, the best way to get it is to remain calm. :colgate

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...