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Up Date On Gracie's Foot


Guest kelli123
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Guest kelli123

OK i just got home from work, So sorry it took so long for me to get back to you . Took her in this morning at 10:00 so that was good we got right in. He took 4 xrays And she was such a good girl he didn't have to put her under Bless her heart, she layed the ways he wanted her to on the x-ray table and was able to manipulate and put her where he needed. So on to the knot lump we will call it. looks to be a ganglion cyst on the bone He says its grizzly and hard in texture. And there is signs of arthritis also there. He thinks its making her limp now and then cause its pressing on a tendon a little the cyst and arthritis isnt helping.

 

 

Now for the scary news on the xrays on the same toe but on the inside of the toe not visible by the eyes but the xrays show a tiny light bright spot in the bone. There is no star burst affect just doesn't look right he said. So that is the scary part, hes not sure why its there its not normal . On the cyst and other spot he doesn't want to do any thing with it right now and wants to watch it for a couple weeks to see if there is any change. I'm real nervous about the whole thing cause if it is cancer i would like to catch it yesterday.. What are your opinions on the light spot on the bone and the cyst. Kelli

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Guest Fasave

Intersting. I'm happy you were able to get Gracie seen today. I have no insights on the bright spot on the x-ray but I'm sure others can. I'm curious if he mentioned how long he thought the cyst may have been there? Did he mention what type of treatment Gracie may need if things don't get better? I hope Gracie feels better soon. Keep us updated.

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Guest goofydog

Healing thoughts for Gracie and calming ones for you. Whatever it is you have caught it early and your vet sounds like he is on top of it. Please keep us posted.

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Please take a look at the images of Daisy's foot in post # 10 in this link. Is that what the bright spot looks like?

 

A GP vet, an orthopedic surgeon (who is a GH owner and the track vet at Wheeling), and the Greyhound Wellness Program have all looked at it and said, at worst, it's arthritis. It was also mentioned by OSU that it could also be an artifact of the angle of the toe in the x-ray--that it could look more dense because it was imaging a second bone underneath (look at some of the regular photos and x-rays in earlier posts to see the way the toe is kind of jammed up).

 

If I were you, I'd send everything you have to Ohio State and have their group take a second look at it.

Donna
Molly the Border Collie & Poquita the American-born Podenga

Bridge Babies: Daisy (Positive Delta) 8/7/2000 - 4/6/2115, Agnes--angel Sage's baby (Regall Rosario) 11/12/01 - 12/18/13, Lucky the mix (Found, w 10 puppies 8/96-Bridge 7/28/11, app. age 16) & CoCo (Cosmo Comet) 12/28/89-5/4/04

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Guest kelli123

On how long the cyst has been there probably awhile it must have got big enough for me to see it yesterday . What we will do with the cyst not sure in a few weeks or earlier if anything changes she will be getting another x-ray. Options just guessing Operation to remove the cyst or amputation of the toe? not sure

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Guest kelli123

Please take a look at the images of Daisy's foot in post # 10 in this link. Is that what the bright spot looks like?

 

A GP vet, an orthopedic surgeon (who is a GH owner and the track vet at Wheeling), and the Greyhound Wellness Program have all looked at it and said, at worst, it's arthritis. It was also mentioned by OSU that it could also be an artifact of the angle of the toe in the x-ray--that it could look more dense because it was imaging a second bone underneath (look at some of the regular photos and x-rays in earlier posts to see the way the toe is kind of jammed up).

 

If I were you, I'd send everything you have to Ohio State and have their group take a second look at it.

It was a little bright under the cyst but the inside spot was not like that. How did you get the pic? with a camera at the vet? i can ask to take a pic and post them here. How much does it cost to send the pic to osu to have them looked at ?

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Guest greytloves

Agreed, I would send to OSU and I would research the Gangalion Cyst. It got that big so quickly? Don't know enough about those, but will research!

 

Glad you got her in today.

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Please take a look at the images of Daisy's foot in post # 10 in this link. Is that what the bright spot looks like?

 

A GP vet, an orthopedic surgeon (who is a GH owner and the track vet at Wheeling), and the Greyhound Wellness Program have all looked at it and said, at worst, it's arthritis. It was also mentioned by OSU that it could also be an artifact of the angle of the toe in the x-ray--that it could look more dense because it was imaging a second bone underneath (look at some of the regular photos and x-rays in earlier posts to see the way the toe is kind of jammed up).

 

If I were you, I'd send everything you have to Ohio State and have their group take a second look at it.

It was a little bright under the cyst but the inside spot was not like that. How did you get the pic? with a camera at the vet? i can ask to take a pic and post them here. How much does it cost to send the pic to osu to have them looked at ?

The older x-rays in post #6 in my old thread I got by holding the films up to my sliding glass door or window and taking a picture. The ones in post #10 were digital x-rays, so I just uploaded the digital images to PhotoBucket directly from the disc the vet gave me.

Donna
Molly the Border Collie & Poquita the American-born Podenga

Bridge Babies: Daisy (Positive Delta) 8/7/2000 - 4/6/2115, Agnes--angel Sage's baby (Regall Rosario) 11/12/01 - 12/18/13, Lucky the mix (Found, w 10 puppies 8/96-Bridge 7/28/11, app. age 16) & CoCo (Cosmo Comet) 12/28/89-5/4/04

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Guest kelli123

Agreed, I would send to OSU and I would research the Ganglion Cyst. It got that big so quickly? Don't know enough about those, but will research!

 

Glad you got her in today.

Was waiting for you today :) you have been so kind with us,

Ganglion cyst are not common in dogs Ive read and vet also confirmed this. Like i had said it must have been there for a while and i just noticed sense it had gotten so big. Do you happen to Know how to send the x-rays there and maybe how much this is for them to read them? He the vet didn't give any pain meds i was sorta surprised. but maybe sense i told him i had left over tramadol he figured we would use that? not sure what the reasoning of that was. Do cyst cause pain? he manipulated her toes and ankle and she wasn't showing and discomfort while he was doing it so i wonder why she limps at times? Maybe the arthritis

 

Please take a look at the images of Daisy's foot in post # 10 in this link. Is that what the bright spot looks like?

 

A GP vet, an orthopedic surgeon (who is a GH owner and the track vet at Wheeling), and the Greyhound Wellness Program have all looked at it and said, at worst, it's arthritis. It was also mentioned by OSU that it could also be an artifact of the angle of the toe in the x-ray--that it could look more dense because it was imaging a second bone underneath (look at some of the regular photos and x-rays in earlier posts to see the way the toe is kind of jammed up).

 

If I were you, I'd send everything you have to Ohio State and have their group take a second look at it.

It was a little bright under the cyst but the inside spot was not like that. How did you get the pic? with a camera at the vet? i can ask to take a pic and post them here. How much does it cost to send the pic to osu to have them looked at ?

The older x-rays in post #6 in my old thread I got by holding the films up to my sliding glass door or window and taking a picture. The ones in post #10 were digital x-rays, so I just uploaded the digital images to PhotoBucket directly from the disc the vet gave me.

Maybe i can go to the vet and take a digital pic of them when he has them on the projector machine that would work . And he only took a pic of just the one bad foot . Thank you for being concerned.

Edited by kelli123
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Guest HoundyGirl

If ganglion cysts in dogs are anything like in humans, they can come up very quickly. I used to get them on the base of one of my fingers. It'd be an M&M sized lump right in the middle of my hand, and it hurt a little. The first time it happened I went to the doctor and found out that it would likely go away on its own. It did, but it returned multiple times. Then I outgrew the process.

 

Good luck with Gracie. Hopefully the x-ray is just showing something like another toe or a little arthritis.

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Guest Fasave

I thought you might be interested in seeing a photo of Thunder's foot. I circled on the photo below the lump that is some what similar to Gracies'. I noticed it right after he came as foster to me last October. It has never seemed to bother him and the vet said it was likely from an injury of some type. Sometimes I do think it swells and shrinks but it could also be my imagination. I've never done x-rays because it doesn't seem to be a problem for him and the vet thinks it's likely it never will. Not sure if it's the same thing that Gracie is dealing with but thought you might be interested.

 

thundersfoot001left.jpg?t=1283262636

 

thundersfoot004.jpg?t=1283262673

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It was a little bright under the cyst but the inside spot was not like that. How did you get the pic? with a camera at the vet? i can ask to take a pic and post them here. How much does it cost to send the pic to osu to have them looked at ?

 

Not sure whether you received a response to this or not. There isn't exactly a fee as your vet should be able to send the x-ray to OSU electronically. I would say though that they do operate on donated funds so if you choose have them provide a second opinion, a small donation is a nice thank you.

Kyle with Stewie ('Super C Ledoux, Super C Sampson x Sing It Blondie) and forever missing my three angels, Jack ('Roy Jack', Greys Flambeau x Miss Cobblepot) and Charlie ('CTR Midas Touch', Leo's Midas x Hallo Argentina) and Shelby ('Shari's Hooty', Flying Viper x Shari Carusi) running free across the bridge.

Gus an coinnich sinn a'rithist my boys and little girl.

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Guest greytloves

I've unfortunately been fighting a battle to keep my dog in therapy work (failed :angryfire ) but wanted to check back in. Go to health and medical forum and I believe there is a thread that tells you how to get xrays to Couto.

 

The little time I did do research on these cysts, I found they are normally old injury related, or repeat stress, and are on joints and have legs that make them difficult to remove for good. Makes sense to not put her on pain meds as it is not an injury (dang it) However, unless he is 100% certain it is Gangalion Cyst I would get it checked out by OSU. Could it be possible he just took a guess? Yup. That is the world of medicine.

 

How is she acting now?

 

Did find this:

 

There are basically five possibilities for a lump on a dog:

1. Cyst, a fluid-filled pocket

2. Abscess, a pus-filled pocket

3. Granuloma, an abscess that has scar tissue

4. Hematoma, a blood-filled pocket

5. Tumor, benign or malignant

 

There are, of course, many variations, although ganglionic cysts are not common in dogs. To fine out what it is, ask your veterinarian to aspirate (remove) some cells. He or she will look at a slide of the cells under a microscope.

 

While some lumps are totally benign and will heal without treatment, others may require timely surgical removal.

 

and this which I found hiliarous:

 

 

"Ganglion cysts use to be treated by hitting the bump with a bible or other large book, this practice is not recommended"

 

Bible Thumping at its finest!

Edited by greytloves
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I'm sorry that I am just seeing this. OSU will do email and phone consults at no cost. However, there have been a few people who have said that they were told that they must sign up for the newsletter / website ($49 for 6 months) and submit their request via the web.

 

I talked to Dr. Couto (the guy in charge at OSU) and he said that this is not true. You do not need to sign up to submit a request for consult. However, if you are a member, please submit it via the web because it will automate the process and help with tracking the dogs they help.

 

If you can afford the $50 please sign up anyway and support this wonderful team. They are not funded by the university and exist solely on donations. The website is:

 

https://greyhound.osu.edu

 

Here is contact info if you don't sign up:

 

Greyhound Health and Wellness Program

Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine

601 Vernon Tharp Street

Columbus, Ohio 43210

Phone: (614) 247-6757 or (614) 247-8490

Email: greyosu@osu.edu

Website: http://www.vet.ohio-state.edu/GHWP.htm (registration and fee now required to get full access to this site)

 

This email goes to the team. If Dr. Couto is traveling, you may get a quicker answer from one of his team members. Drs. Marin and Zaldivar typically respond to greyhound owners. The consult is free but if you can afford to support the program please do so. You can sign up for full access to the website ($99 per calendar year) or donate through the giving page on the website. If you decide to donate, you can double your money by giving through the Greyhound Project. Just go to this website and scroll down to the appropriate donation button: http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/donate.shtml. They will match the funds that you donate.

 

The Team:

 

Dr. Couto, Department Head, Greyhound Medicine, Oncology and Hematology

Dr. Lili Marin, Greyhound Health and Oncology

Dr. Sara Zaldivar, Greyhound Health and Oncology

Dr. William Kisselberth, Oncology

Dr. Cheryl London, Oncology

Dr. Cristina Iazbik, Blood Bank Director and Hematologist

Dr. Bridget Urie, Oncology Resident

Dr. Matt Sherger, Oncology Resident

Dr. Joelle Fenger, Oncology Resident

Dawn Hudson, Vet Tech

Ashley DeFelice, Vet Tech

Stacey Gallant, Vet Tech

 

Drs Marin and Zaldivar are originally from Spanish speaking countries. If you have trouble understanding them over the phone, you might ask for one of the other vets or vet techs to “translate”.

 

Dr. Couto's direct email is:

couto.1@osu.edu

His phone number is also 614-247-6757. If he is in town, he typically returns emails in the early hours of the morning.

 

You should know that (in my humble opinion) they need more staff. Unfortunately finances do not permit it at this time. They do 20 to 30 greyhound consults a day along with all of their "in canine" patients. Depending on their workload there may be a wait for the consultation. If you are contacting them on an emergency basis, please let them know.

If you want to make an appointment to be seen in person/canine, you can call the main number to set up a date/time. The main number for the veterinary hospital is 614-292-3551.

 

If you decide to visit OSU please contact me. I may be able to put you up in a local home, provide moral support, or just help with logistics:

 

Finewhipador-drool@yahoo.com

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Guest kelli123

I've unfortunately been fighting a battle to keep my dog in therapy work (failed :angryfire ) but wanted to check back in. Go to health and medical forum and I believe there is a thread that tells you how to get xrays to Couto.

 

The little time I did do research on these cysts, I found they are normally old injury related, or repeat stress, and are on joints and have legs that make them difficult to remove for good. Makes sense to not put her on pain meds as it is not an injury (dang it) However, unless he is 100% certain it is Gangalion Cyst I would get it checked out by OSU. Could it be possible he just took a guess? Yup. That is the world of medicine.

 

How is she acting now?

 

Did find this:

 

There are basically five possibilities for a lump on a dog:

1. Cyst, a fluid-filled pocket

2. Abscess, a pus-filled pocket

3. Granuloma, an abscess that has scar tissue

4. Hematoma, a blood-filled pocket

5. Tumor, benign or malignant

 

There are, of course, many variations, although ganglionic cysts are not common in dogs. To fine out what it is, ask your veterinarian to aspirate (remove) some cells. He or she will look at a slide of the cells under a microscope.

 

While some lumps are totally benign and will heal without treatment, others may require timely surgical removal.

 

and this which I found Hilarius:

 

 

Ganglion cysts use to be treated by hitting the bump with a bible or other large book, this practice is not recommended

 

Bible Thumping at its finest!

 

Thanks for taking the time and looking this up. We did some research but it wasn't as good as what you found. I will call Dr. Tom tomorrow and see what he thinks about aspirating the spot.

And ill see if i can get the X-rays from him and send to osu with a donation of course for there time.

 

She seems OK today her foot is wet so she has been licking it.

She will walk fine and then limp at other times. Its just scary when i look at it now that i know its there it looks huge.

I seen that they where also called Bible bumps I would think that if god would have any thing to do with this lump it wouldn't be there at all . Once again thanks

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I've unfortunately been fighting a battle to keep my dog in therapy work (failed :angryfire ) but wanted to check back in. Go to health and medical forum and I believe there is a thread that tells you how to get xrays to Couto.

 

The little time I did do research on these cysts, I found they are normally old injury related, or repeat stress, and are on joints and have legs that make them difficult to remove for good. Makes sense to not put her on pain meds as it is not an injury (dang it) However, unless he is 100% certain it is Gangalion Cyst I would get it checked out by OSU. Could it be possible he just took a guess? Yup. That is the world of medicine.

 

How is she acting now?

 

Did find this:

 

There are basically five possibilities for a lump on a dog:

1. Cyst, a fluid-filled pocket

2. Abscess, a pus-filled pocket

3. Granuloma, an abscess that has scar tissue

4. Hematoma, a blood-filled pocket

5. Tumor, benign or malignant

 

There are, of course, many variations, although ganglionic cysts are not common in dogs. To fine out what it is, ask your veterinarian to aspirate (remove) some cells. He or she will look at a slide of the cells under a microscope.

 

While some lumps are totally benign and will heal without treatment, others may require timely surgical removal.

 

and this which I found Hilarius:

 

 

Ganglion cysts use to be treated by hitting the bump with a bible or other large book, this practice is not recommended

 

Bible Thumping at its finest!

 

Thanks for taking the time and looking this up. We did some research but it wasn't as good as what you found. I will call Dr. Tom tomorrow and see what he thinks about aspirating the spot.

And ill see if i can get the X-rays from him and send to osu with a donation of course for there time.

 

She seems OK today her foot is wet so she has been licking it.

She will walk fine and then limp at other times. Its just scary when i look at it now that i know its there it looks huge.

I seen that they where also called Bible bumps I would think that if god would have any thing to do with this lump it wouldn't be there at all . Once again thanks

 

Um, they were called Bible Bumps because old fashioned treatment was to break the capsule by hitting the cyst with a Very Large Book, usually a Bible. :blush This was in the era when urine was tested for spilled sugar by tasting it. :)

Angie, Pewter, and Storm-puppy

Forever missing Misty-Mousie (9/9/99 - 10/5/15)
Fort Wayne, Indiana

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Guest kelli123

I'm sorry that I am just seeing this. OSU will do email and phone consults at no cost. However, there have been a few people who have said that they were told that they must sign up for the newsletter / website ($49 for 6 months) and submit their request via the web.

 

I talked to Dr. Couto (the guy in charge at OSU) and he said that this is not true. You do not need to sign up to submit a request for consult. However, if you are a member, please submit it via the web because it will automate the process and help with tracking the dogs they help.

 

If you can afford the $50 please sign up anyway and support this wonderful team. They are not funded by the university and exist solely on donations. The website is:

 

https://greyhound.osu.edu

 

Here is contact info if you don't sign up:

 

Greyhound Health and Wellness Program

Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine

601 Vernon Tharp Street

Columbus, Ohio 43210

Phone: (614) 247-6757 or (614) 247-8490

Email: greyosu@osu.edu

Website: http://www.vet.ohio-state.edu/GHWP.htm (registration and fee now required to get full access to this site)

 

This email goes to the team. If Dr. Couto is traveling, you may get a quicker answer from one of his team members. Drs. Marin and Zaldivar typically respond to greyhound owners. The consult is free but if you can afford to support the program please do so. You can sign up for full access to the website ($99 per calendar year) or donate through the giving page on the website. If you decide to donate, you can double your money by giving through the Greyhound Project. Just go to this website and scroll down to the appropriate donation button: http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/donate.shtml. They will match the funds that you donate.

 

The Team:

 

Dr. Couto, Department Head, Greyhound Medicine, Oncology and Hematology

Dr. Lili Marin, Greyhound Health and Oncology

Dr. Sara Zaldivar, Greyhound Health and Oncology

Dr. William Kisselberth, Oncology

Dr. Cheryl London, Oncology

Dr. Cristina Iazbik, Blood Bank Director and Hematologist

Dr. Bridget Urie, Oncology Resident

Dr. Matt Sherger, Oncology Resident

Dr. Joelle Fenger, Oncology Resident

Dawn Hudson, Vet Tech

Ashley DeFelice, Vet Tech

Stacey Gallant, Vet Tech

 

Drs Marin and Zaldivar are originally from Spanish speaking countries. If you have trouble understanding them over the phone, you might ask for one of the other vets or vet techs to “translate”.

 

Dr. Couto's direct email is:

couto.1@osu.edu

His phone number is also 614-247-6757. If he is in town, he typically returns emails in the early hours of the morning.

 

You should know that (in my humble opinion) they need more staff. Unfortunately finances do not permit it at this time. They do 20 to 30 greyhound consults a day along with all of their "in canine" patients. Depending on their workload there may be a wait for the consultation. If you are contacting them on an emergency basis, please let them know.

If you want to make an appointment to be seen in person/canine, you can call the main number to set up a date/time. The main number for the veterinary hospital is 614-292-3551.

 

If you decide to visit OSU please contact me. I may be able to put you up in a local home, provide moral support, or just help with logistics:

 

Finewhipador-drool@yahoo.com

Thanks so much Jan for the information i will print this out .

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Guest greytloves

Um, they were called Bible Bumps because old fashioned treatment was to break the capsule by hitting the cyst with a Very Large Book, usually a Bible. :blush This was in the era when urine was tested for spilled sugar by tasting it. :)

 

 

After the day I have had I needed that laugh. Learn something new every day. Glad I never had to taste urine!!!!!!

 

I would be keeping an eye on the licking. Can be a sign that it is bothering her. And she can create a lick granuloma which is a PIA to get rid of. (I know as I am dealing with that right now!)

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I was wondering why the vet didn't perform a fine needle aspirate already??? I understand that not all tumors will give off cells well but, if it was me I sure would make the attempt. If the results return with questionable findings I'm sure Dr Couto at Ohio State would scan the slide for you. Just a thought.

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Guest kelli123

I was wondering why the vet didn't perform a fine needle aspirate already??? I understand that not all tumors will give off cells well but, if it was me I sure would make the attempt. If the results return with questionable findings I'm sure Dr Couto at Ohio State would scan the slide for you. Just a thought.

I have know idea why he didn't do that. I never thought of that because i just didn't know enough to ask. Do they have to put them under to do that?

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