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The Tooth Fairy Is Coming To Pa....


Guest janiek
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Guest onlymrsp

TaaaDaaa :D ....the one and only Tooth Fairy is coming to Rooo Valley Kennel in Port Matilda, Pennsylvania.

 

She will be here on Thursday 4/29, Friday 4/30, Sunday 5/1 and available at the Waggin Train Pet Store in Clearfield, PA on Saturday 4/31. Reservations are required, and you can get more information listed below. Trust me,she is GREYT. :thumbs-up :thumbs-up with the puppers but also with the people, she knows her stuff. There is NO anesthesia, the dogs are NOT traumatized, and you can watch and learn from her too..

 

TOOTH CLEANING CLINIC: Kathy, our Tooth Fairy, will be back for a Clinic! This is a sonic cleaning just like your vet does, but with no anesthetic! You can be with your pup the whole time and be done in a half hour. The cost is $160 per dog (with a $20 per dog deposit that will guarantee your appointment -- check or credit card accepted). The balance will be paid at the time of service. For more information or to make an appointment, call 814-933-6981 and we will be more than happy to help you with whatever questions you may have at our Nittany phone number. The appointments for your visit at RooValley in Port Matilda, PA will be Thursday, April 29; Friday, April 30; or Sunday, May 1. That Saturday will be reserved for appointments at the Waggin Train pet store in Clearfield, PA.

 

So, if your puppers need their teeth cleaned and you can make it to our kennel, please call and make your reservation, or visit our website at Nittany Greyhounds for directions to our site at RoooValley in Port Matilda, PA. If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact us at 814-933-6981, or PM me.

 

Jennie P.

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Guest onlymrsp

We refer to her as the Tooth Fairy :D , but in reality she is HOUNDSTOOTH DENTAL.

Here is a link to her site for those who might be interested:

 

Houndstooth

 

She is out of Willmington California for those of you on the West Coast. She was here last year and was a smashing success. To the best of my knowledge, there isn't anyone here on the East Coast like this, so we have her "imported" for us here, lol. :lol::lol:

 

I hope this helps those of you that posted about your area. So, she will travel, but you will need to contact her for specifics.

 

Jennie P

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest bluefawn

I have read to much info posted saying that this is really not advisable. I agree that it's a quickie outer surface cleaning, but I keep seeing info that the type of scalers used can actually damage the enamel and leave grooves that make good hiding places for bacteria, tartar, and plaque. Dentals done in a vet's office include a smoothing and placement of a protective layer to prevent these from building up faster. When dentals are done in a vet's office, they also clean the insides of the teeth and look for any potential problems while they are in there. And with anesthesia so much safer now than it used to be, I'd just rather not take a chance. I get dentals done for $125.00. I drop Penny off early in the morning and pick her up just before they close, and I feel much better doing it this way. What I am saying is, please just research this thoroughly before you decide which way to go. smile.gif

This is a good article that is agreed on by many in the veterinary field:

 

http://www.petdocsoncall.com/page.asp?id=90&name=Anesthesia%20Free%20Pet%20Dentistry

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Guest chaoran22

I have been researching this recently, and I was also wondering about the polishing issue. Do these "tooth fairies" polish after scaling? I used to scale my dogs' teeth myself, it's actually super easy, you don't have to pay someone to do it, but I stopped doing it because i was afraid of scratching that might make the situation worse when I learned about that. My impression, however, is that these tooth fairies don't just scale and that they acutally polish afterward as well. Is that true? If so, then it really seems like a worthwhile procedure and I would be interested in it. Could we get info from someone who's seen this done as to what exactly the procedure is? Thanks!

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Guest kydie

Yep, I did it the last time to tooth fairy was at Nittany greyhounds, and she also polished, and because my grey's teeth were in pretty good shape the cost was much less, I would do it again! :nod I was there and she cleaned between the teeth too :nod When I heard she was going to be in my area again, I check all of mines teeth, all are good right now, since I took recomendations from her, during her last visit, my pups teeth are all beauuuuuuutiful now she educated you along the way, showing you anything she would find :clap And would I do it again ! you bet, I hate the thought of putting my dog to sleep to have teeth cleaned, just me now!

Edited by kydie
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We just saw Dali this past weekend for the second time. My vet saw Aquitaine today and is very happy with the results. Dali had a tech and a vet with her at the clinic this past weekend. She did suggest that we get x-rays as there has been erosion over the past year. There is a board certified canine dentist here in the city that we will see. My own vet thinks this is a great way to keep up with the hygiene for my girl.

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Guest bluefawn

Yep, I did it the last time to tooth fairy was at Nittany greyhounds, and she also polished, and because my grey's teeth were in pretty good shape the cost was much less, I would do it again! :nod I was there and she cleaned between the teeth too :nod When I heard she was going to be in my area again, I check all of mines teeth, all are good right now, since I took recomendations from her, during her last visit, my pups teeth are all beauuuuuuutiful now she educated you along the way, showing you anything she would find :clap And would I do it again ! you bet, I hate the thought of putting my dog to sleep to have teeth cleaned, just me now!

 

So she cleans the inside teeth too, and she can advise on any needs they have like a needed extraction or treat potential gum and/or other issues? If so, then it sounds like this procedure is going to put a lot of vets out of the business of anesthetic dentals. The other issue I would really worry about is: if the dog moves at all during the Tooth Fairy's procedure, she could lacerate gum and/or mouth tissues or the hard palate. Where would you be then? Can the Tooth Fairy treat this kind of trauma on the spot? I don't think so. I have been present to watch this procedure done, and people are walking by with their pets and their squeaky toys, etc. What if someone else's pet chews on a toy and it squeaks? I'm sorry, but this is just too big a risk for me to take with my girls. But I am glad that some of you have an alternative, although anesthesia is very safe now, unless your pet is already medically compromised.

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Guest onlymrsp

When she was here at Nittany, we had her set up in a quiet private place behind a door with only herself and the owners of the pet. When she did my dog and another here at the house, she sat on my kitchen floor. Once she sat on the floor with the dog's head in her lap, it was if she sprinkled fairy dust or something on them :huh ...they DID NOT move!!! I'm serious, they were still and she even showed us what she was doing, and at the point that she got some black stuff out from under the gumline we just about threw up.... :eek . We didn't know what it could be until she explained it was HAIR....the dogs never cried, jerked away, bled, or anything.....and yes, she did advise us how to control the problems that she saw.

 

All in all, it was a positive experience for both dogs and humans.

 

Jennie P.

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Guest eaglflyt

Does anyone know what is entailed with getting Houndstooth to come to your area? I've sent an email, but don't expect to hear anything until Monday at the earliest.

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My vet and tech do some light maintenance scaling on Zema while she is awake. No reason others can't do it. In general, a lot of the teeth I see on dogs, I would not recommend substituting for a regular dental. But if dog doesn't have a lot of built-up crud / serious periodontal disease and will hold still ... it works for Zema.

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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Guest eaglflyt

I agree with Batmom, I'd never substitute it for a regular dental for a dog with stage 4 periodontal disease. Houndstooth folks will also not work on dogs with serious periodontal disease. I think for dogs without serious disease and without need for extractions, it may be beneficial ... especially since they do reach below the gumline into pockets and polish afterwards.

 

I do have an additional question. Does anyone know if dogs are placed on antibiotics prior to having a dental done if they have other health issues ... as they do in humans that have cardiac problems, immunosuppression, or other problems? Maybe this is discussed prior to the procedure, or one of the reasons a vet may be in attendance. I know that dogs do receive antibiotics for severe periodontal problems, but it seems to me it might be a good idea before a dental if they have other issues. However, I know NOTHING about what I'm asking here. :blink:

Edited by eaglflyt
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Seems to me in one of the other dental threads, feemandvm mentioned doing it. But I could be misremembering. My own vets haven't, but none of my dogs have ever had particularly nasty teeth, other health conditions, or extractions.

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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Guest eaglflyt

One of the reasons I'm asking is that I'm babysitting a couple of extra greys this week. They are both senior greys and their owner is hesitant to put them through anesthesia because of their advanced age. I can literally smell their breath from another room. :sick

 

The owner has given me permission to work on their mouths with Petzlife Oral Care gel for the next week. I think a dental is needed, and maybe this type without anesthesia would be a good option for them. Although, they may need extractions. I'm not sure.

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It is my understanding that much of the plaque that is removed during a dental is below the gum line. There is no way to safely remove this below gum line plaque on an awake patient. These pups are not humans that you can ask to remain still and not move. The results of a dog suddenly moving with a sharp instrument in their mouth could be very bad. The end result is a mouth that on appearances looks clean and sparkly, but underneath, still harbors the unwanted plaque. IMHO this is a very bad idea for the average dog. It might well be appropriate for a dog that is otherwise unable to undergo anesthesia though.

Edited by cello

gallery_9381_2904_4242.jpg

Molly Weasley Carpenter-Caro - 4 Year Old Standard Poodle.

Gizzy, Specky, Riley Roo & Lady - Our beloved Greyhounds waiting at the Rainbow Bridge.

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I have read to much info posted saying that this is really not advisable. I agree that it's a quickie outer surface cleaning, but I keep seeing info that the type of scalers used can actually damage the enamel and leave grooves that make good hiding places for bacteria, tartar, and plaque. Dentals done in a vet's office include a smoothing and placement of a protective layer to prevent these from building up faster. When dentals are done in a vet's office, they also clean the insides of the teeth and look for any potential problems while they are in there. And with anesthesia so much safer now than it used to be, I'd just rather not take a chance. I get dentals done for $125.00. I drop Penny off early in the morning and pick her up just before they close, and I feel much better doing it this way. What I am saying is, please just research this thoroughly before you decide which way to go. smile.gif

This is a good article that is agreed on by many in the veterinary field:

 

http://www.petdocson...Pet%20Dentistry

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wow. Trust me--that's DIRT cheap. Minimum cost for a dental here is $400.

 

 


Hamish-siggy1.jpg

Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

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It is my understanding that much of the plaque that is removed during a dental is below the gum line. There is no way to safely remove this below gum line plaque on an awake patient.

 

Can't speak for others, but the tech who does Zema's awake work is the same one who does her asleep work. She does the same things either way. I would imagine she braces/holds her tools the same way our hygienist does, so that the patient doesn't get stabbed if s/he moves unexpectedly. My vet and tech won't do Joseph awake because he's too squirmy and too strong to restrain.

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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Guest eaglflyt

It is my understanding that much of the plaque that is removed during a dental is below the gum line. There is no way to safely remove this below gum line plaque on an awake patient. These pups are not humans that you can ask to remain still and not move. The results of a dog suddenly moving with a sharp instrument in their mouth could be very bad. The end result is a mouth that on appearances looks clean and sparkly, but underneath, still harbors the unwanted plaque. IMHO this is a very bad idea for the average dog. It might well be appropriate for a dog that is otherwise unable to undergo anesthesia though.

 

Apparently, as stated on their website, they can and do clean below the gumline successfully in most instances. You can read about it here.

 

For dogs that are too old to risk anesthesia, or perhaps have had severe anesthesia reactions, I think this may be a very good alternative. It would be better than nothing, at least. Their website explains clearly that not every dog is a candidate and severe dental/periodontal disease still requires a regular veterinary dental. Their website seems to be very straight forward and not promising miracles for every dog, but is an option for many.

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