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Guest Greensleeves

Sub-cutaneous Fluids: How Much?

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Guest Greensleeves

Yes, another Nelly post! :lol

 

I'm wondering, for those who've done sub-cu fluids with their dogs (greyhound-sized, of course!), how much did they get at one time? When our vet first brought it up, he said he'd try to get about 300ccs into Nelly (about 70lbs), but he ended up giving 500ccs, to last from Friday afternoon until Monday morning. The DogAware website, though, talks about sub-cu fluids for a 45 lb Shar-Pei, getting 800-1000 ccs two or three times a week to start (http://www.dogaware.com/kidney.html#sub-q). I know 500 ccs wasn't enough to rehydrate Nelly sufficiently to allow them to give her a standard IV.

 

Anyone have thoughts on dosage?

 

Thanks!

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Guest luckydog

I use to give my 30 pound mutt 100cc's every night. I couldn't even begin to imagine giving him anywhere near 800!

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Guest multigrey

I have given a 70 lb greyhound anywhere between 500 ml and 1000 ml at a time. The fluid will make a "hump" between their shoulder blades and then "fall", making your dog look very strange. It really does not take long for the body to absorb the fluid at all. And it certainly never bothered Sport!

I was able to help keep Sport's kidney numbers from rising quickly by giving subcutaneous fluids almost every day for two straight years. He used to come over and stand with his head in my lap until I took the needle out. Never could get him to lay down....ever.

 

Even to this day I walk into my office and am surprised not to see a bag of fluids with lines attached, hanging from the ceiling fan. (we improvised!!)

 

 

 

 

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Actually, this is an excellent article from Washington State on subcutaneous fluids, including step-by-step photos and directions:

http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/ClientED/dog_fluids.aspx

 

 

Most dogs tolerate being given subcutaneous fluids. You can give about 10-20 ml per kg of body weight (5 -10 ml per pound) in one spot (e.g. 50 ml for a 10 pound dog) before you move to another location. It usually takes 6 to 8 hours for all the fluids to be absorbed. Check to see if the previously administered fluids have been absorbed before giving more fluids. Even though the fluids are given on the back, gravity will cause the fluids to accumulate on the belly, so check for residual fluids on the belly before you give more. Check with your veterinarian if the fluids are not being fully absorbed.

My iggie Lexi, 20 lbs, was receiving subQ boluses of 200cc, so 20 cc/lb.

 

 


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Guest GiJenn51

Depending on how dehydrated your hound is-- a good starting point is 300cc if they're really tenting then I'd go for 500. You can do 100 without a problem--- please be sure that they're eating and they're sodium, potassium aren't screwy too.

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We used to give our CRF kitty 100 cc every couple of days.

 

Why not contact your vet for dosage?


Camille, Mom to Cher and Centeno! Also the kitties: Dash, Tod, and Starburst.
Waiting at the Bridge: Bam Bam, Mimi, Mimosa Grove, Magic, Roscoe, Buckwheat, Knick Knack, and Skylarphoto-11974.jpg?__rand=0.00790800+129039

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Guest LynnM

It depends on the dog and how much skin they have to work with. The amount you can fit under a loose-skinned dog like a SharPei is nearly limitless.

 

500-600 is the most I've run into a greyhound.

 

Lynn

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

My geriatric female kitty (12lbs.) gets 200cc every-other day (kidney failure). I would think that 500 every day or every-other day is not a lot for a large dog. As far as the "enough" to hydrate, the sub-q fluids is not meant to hydrate instantly. I believe you need to give the fluids over a course of days, so if the vet was able to get 500cc's in, then that may be the amount you give your pooch for the next week or so, but of course, this should all be discussed with your vet.

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Guest Greensleeves

Thanks, everyone! Nelly went in for another treatment today (500 ccs, plus more of the same Wed and Friday). She seems a little tired today, and alas, as we were walking home, her "water hump" slumped to the side and is now settling in her shoulder, poor girl!

 

Getting ready to feed her now--see if she'll eat anything for lunch. Keep your paws crossed!!

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Not to hijack the thread, but is it acceptable to give fluids in this manner in emergencies?

 

We had a greyhound a year ago May or June that got lost for 2-1/2 days. The weather wasn't much into the 90's out here, but she must have had no access to water; they found her under a tree, mouth filled with dirt all the way back to the molars- presumably the delerium of dehydration. She made it to the E-vet, and I presume she lived but have always wondered since then if there was a way to get fluids into a severely dehydrated dog in the field.

 

I suppose IV would be superior, but finding a vein on a dehydrated dog is tough enough. Would this method of giving sub-q fluids work in a pinch?


Coco (Maze Cocodrillo)

Minerva (Kid's Snipper)

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Not to hijack the thread, but is it acceptable to give fluids in this manner in emergencies?

 

We had a greyhound a year ago May or June that got lost for 2-1/2 days. The weather wasn't much into the 90's out here, but she must have had no access to water; they found her under a tree, mouth filled with dirt all the way back to the molars- presumably the delerium of dehydration. She made it to the E-vet, and I presume she lived but have always wondered since then if there was a way to get fluids into a severely dehydrated dog in the field.

 

I suppose IV would be superior, but finding a vein on a dehydrated dog is tough enough. Would this method of giving sub-q fluids work in a pinch?

 

I'm just guessing here, but because of the time it takes for a dog to absorb sub-q fluids, I would think it would be better to just get the dog to the vet and have the vet start an IV. The exception of course would be if you weren't in close proximity to a vet, in which case I would assume sub-q fluids would be better than nothing until you could get to one. Again, just speculating. :dunno


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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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Guest Greensleeves

I know that they weren't able to get Nelly hydrated *enough* with 500 ccs of sub-cu fluids to start an IV in her leg, so they ended up putting the IV in her jugular vein. And this was a dog who'd just been living her normal life, drinking like normal, etc.

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Guest suzye

My 51 pound greyhound has been getting 400-500mL daily for the last 9 months. The vet recommended 200 which isn't even 1 cup. I worked my way up to 400 over a week or so when I first started. She has been stable on that amount for some time, but we are going to vet for a check-up soon. It's virtually all absorbed by morning (I give it at night).

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