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Osto And Cancer


Guest GLUVER
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Hi I'm new to Greys and I don't have one yet. I'm doing the whole research thing first, anyways reading these topics in here are really scary. Is it just a fact that so many Greys are sufferring with this, is that what I can look forward too? Also is there anything to look out for when you first get your dog...like how many races he's ran etc.

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Most (all?) large breed dogs have increased susceptibility to osteosarcoma. While it is unfortunate that greys- with their big, long legs- have such an increased incidence of the disease, it is worth noting that due to improved nutrition and the level of prophylactic care (vaccinations, regular vet visits, etc.), dogs that are cared for by well-meaning owners are living longer than ever. Additional improvements have been made in terms of treatments that are specific to osteo; I seem to recall Dr. Cuoto's protocols are such that one-year survival rates are around 62% when amputation is used in conjunction with chemo. My point is this: every living organism has to die of *something*. Osteo happens to be present in greys- and other breeds- at a disproportionate rate. That it occurs more often at a greater age is, in a sad way, encouraging as it implies they are not succumbing to other disorders. Look at the nasty disorders in some other breeds, particularly from "puppy mills."

 

While there may be a genetic predisposition towards bone cancer, it is probably not environmental. Or, if it is, it may have already been "set." I'm one of those folks who thinks that fluoride may be a prediposing environmental factor with respect to bone cancer; we feed our dogs reverse osmosis water, which has very low levels of fluoride. However, as the fluoride would have been incorporated into their bones at a young age, when they were back on the farm, this may not matter. (As an aside, the drugs that prevent osteoporosis reduce the amount of "cycling," in which calcium is removed from bone, and returned to bone, so what little I know about the subject implies that bone composition may change throughout life and, therefore, reducing fluoride intake may affect that- or not, as fluoride binds much more tightly than calcium. Plus, like I said, I'm a wacko that thinks fluoride *may* be responsible for *some* bone cancers.)

 

Anyway- I certainly don't wish to minimize the impact of osteo, as it certainly has struck dogs at a distressingly early age. It's a horrible disease, but one that can sometimes be managed. Moreover, there are advances on the horizon with respect to treatments and even vaccines that can be used to get dogs to live longer. If we can do for osteo what has been done for melanoma (now in late experimental stages), we can improve the outlook even more.

Coco (Maze Cocodrillo)

Minerva (Kid's Snipper)

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Any large dog is at risk to develop osteosarcoma. It wouldn't be fair to say that greyhounds have a higher rate of osteo then any other dog. It may seem that way because of boards like this. People come here for advice or help. So there are many posts on repeat subjects, one of them being cancer. Not every large breed dog owner has a message board to run to for information. So osteo striking in other large breed dogs less reported. That doesn't mean that it doesn't happen.

 

My overall thoughts is that osteo is probably genetic. That gets expressed at all different ages, young or old. We don't know the real reason yet but Dr. Couto with Ohio State is doing many studies to find out what causes osteo and has made wonderful developments in extending the life of hounds diagnosed with osteo.

 

Greyhounds are wonderful companions to have. Health concerns (that may or may not arise) shouldn't distract you from your decision.

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Carolina (R and A Carolina) & Rebel (FA Ready).
At the bridge: Kira (Driven by Energy) 7/19/97 - 6/17/04 & Jake (Jumpstart Dude) 9/12/00 - 1/24/15

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Hi I'm new to Greys and I don't have one yet. I'm doing the whole research thing first, anyways reading these topics in here are really scary. Is it just a fact that so many Greys are sufferring with this, is that what I can look forward too? Also is there anything to look out for when you first get your dog...like how many races he's ran etc.

Hi and :welcome2 !!

Keep in mind when you are reading Health and Medical discussion that people don't come into this forum to talk about their greyhounds who are well and healthy, those that come here are doing so because they have a dog with a medical problem. It helps to keep that thought in mind.

 

To add to your research I recommend a couple of books... "Adopting the Racing Greyhound" by Cynthia Branigan and "Retired Racing Greyhounds For Dummies" by Lee Livingood.

Adopting the Racing Greyhound linky

Retired racing Greyhounds For Dummies linky

Greyhound angels at the bridge- Casey, Charlie, Maggie, Molly, Renie, Lucy & Teddy. Beagle angels Peanut and Charlie. And to all the 4 legged Bridge souls who have touched my heart, thank you. When a greyhound looks into you eyes it seems they touch your very soul.

"A dog is the only thing on earth that loves you more then he loves himself". Josh Billings

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I have not read through all the posts but a greyhound is no more susceptible to CA than any other large breed of dog. One thing you do not have to worry about is Hip dysplaysia as it has been bred out of the hounds.

 

 

ROBIN ~ Mom to: Beau Think It Aint, Chloe JC Allthewayhome, Teddy ICU Drunk Sailor, Elsie N Fracine , Ollie RG's Travertine, Ponch A's Jupiter~ Yoshi, Zoobie & Belle, the kitties.

Waiting at the bridge Angel Polli Bohemian Ocean , Rocky, Blue,Sasha & Zoobie & Bobbi

Greyhound Angels Adoption (GAA) The Lexus Project

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I guess the way I look at it is that all dogs are going to die of something. If it's not this, it's that. I get scared about osteo, too, but my old girl just died of something completely different. Every death is painful to us, but as some very wise GTers reminded me when my Simon died, it was worth the pain of losing her to have given her a happy life.

Edited by SusanP
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Guest CindyMessmore

For what its worth.... We had Jersey for a short time, she was an older gal which had been returned to our group. DH & I brought her home and added her to our pack. She developed Osteo. Eventually, we made the decision, due to her age, etc to "let her go". As difficult as that was, I wouldn't give up the time we had with her. Even if I had known from day one what we would go thru, I would still have brought her home. Darn disease! But What-a-Gal! She was such a blessing to us. I will always remember Jersey.

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