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Mt. Hounds First Aid Seminar (Update Post One)


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Guest Energy11

JUST A REMINDER TO BRING ALL OF YOUR MEDICATIONS, AND YOUR DOG'S. I will doing VERY limited on-site basic medicals this year, and will NOT be giving out any OTC medications, so please remember to bring everything you need. The area veterinarians will be listed in your handouts upon registration.

 

Because of financial issues, Karen will not be attending this year or presenting with me . sad.gif But, this will give us more time for questions, answers and discussions at the first aid semiar. See you there!!!

 

Hello All!

 

Well, Mountain Hounds is just around the corner! Boy, I PRAY it won't be too hot! They are calling for 90s HERE on Friday.

 

Karen Chandler and I have been invited back to give another first aid seminar, which will be presented, I think, Friday at 2 p.m.

 

I am about to go over last year's and "beef it up" a little, and add somethings I have learned during the last year. I would LOVE suggestions from all of you, regarding what you'd like to see, additions, whatever you think.

 

We will do THE BEST we can to present a layperson's version of basic dog first aid, and also share some tips with you that work for us.

 

I, personally, will not be able to make copies of my part of the presentation like I did last year. (**too expensive***)but, I will include my email, and if you'd like copies, you will be able to email me after the event and get them.

 

Thanks in advance for any ideas or request you may have.

 

Dee and Karen, too!

 

See you all there!

 

DON'T FORGET YOUR FIRST AID KIT, PLEASE!!!

 

FIRST AID KIT MUST-HAVES:

 

Bandaids of ALL sizes. Antibacterial ointment or Trypzyme-V for wound coverage. Toddler Socks and booties. I recommend toddler shoe size 3-8.5 for the socks , and booties from The Voyagers (high ones). Transpore tape. Stretch gauze (Kling) to wrap wounds or vet wrap. Benedryl (generic is fine) 25mg... give (2) of these, every four hours, if you know your dog has been bitten by an insect, or you know for sure he or she is allergic to an ingested food. Deramaxx 75mg, (*my choice) for pain and inflammation. You CAN use one BUFFERED 81 mg aspirin for pain, but not for extended use. Immodium AD (generic is fine) (1) tablet two times a day for diarrhea. Pepcid AC, 20 mg, (generic fine) (1) tablet a day, or ½ twice a day for gas and stomach irritation. Small bottle of Hydrogen Peroxide to induce vomiting. (2) tablespoons total until vomiting occurs. Kwik Stop for bleeding control. (For seizure dogs) A syringe of pre-loaded Valium for trans-rectal use during a prolonged seizure. Gatorade to add to the water, cooling blankets or lots of towels you can wet to help avoid heat stroke/exhaustion.

 

**I also travel with canned Science Diet ID or Purina EN (both scripts through your vet), in case your dog gets diarrhea. It is easier then trying to make a bland diet. Also, most people bring bottled water for their dogs as well.

 

Include your personal vet's number, the local vet's number where you will be staying and the Animal Poison Control number: 888-426-4435.

***all OTC medications, dosages and recommendations HAVE been run past and approved by a licensed veterinarian.***** Medications like Valium and Deramaxx CAN ONLY BE PRESCRIBED by a licensed vet.

Edited by Energy11
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-CPR

 

-evaluating emergency and non-emergency situations

 

-dog and human medications to avoid or use for chronic or emergency situations

 

-normal and abnormal dog temperature and pulse rates

 

:)

 

Hada the podenco maneta, Georgie Girl (UMR Cordella), Lulu the podenco andaluz, Rita the podenco maneta
Angels: Charlie the iggy,  Mazy (CBR Crazy Girl), Potato, my mystery ibizan girl, Allen (M's Pretty Boy), Percy (Fast But True), Mikey (Doray's Patuti), Pudge le mutt, Tessa the iggy, Possum (Apostle), Gracie (Dusty Lady), Harold (Slatex Harold), "Cousin" Simon our step-iggy, Little Dude the iggy ,Bandit (Bb Blue Jay), Niña the galgo, Wally (Allen Hogg), Thane (Pog Mo Thoine), Oliver (JJ Special Agent), Comet, & Rosie our original mutt.

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Guest Energy11

-CPR

 

-evaluating emergency and non-emergency situations

 

-dog and human medications to avoid or use for chronic or emergency situations

 

-normal and abnormal dog temperature and pulse rates

 

smile.gif

 

Thanks, Ducky! I can do a hand out for the CPR, but not being certified in dog CPR, therefore, I cannot demonstrate it. I will definitely add info about how to evaluate, and normal temps, pulse rates, etc.

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Guest Energy11

Call a vet and run this all by them. If a vet or animal control learns of you doing this without their consult they have every right to report you for practicing veterinary medicine without a license (which you are since you're recommending specific drugs and dosages and when to use them without a license). Practicing medicine without a license is illegal, and for good reason. A good vet would be thrilled to work with you and probably provide excellent suggestions about what to talk about and make sure you're legally in the clear (we live in a very litigious society). There are situations in which you would absolutely not want to give some of the drugs you listed which is why only licensed veterinarians are allowed to prescribe drugs and dosages. I've seen people kill their pets with the best of intentions with drugs they thought would work. To keep yourself from getting reported and sued you should never ever recommend drugs or doses! Ever! It's illegal!

 

My apologies if you've already gotten this ok'd by a vet or if you're certified in pet first aid. I'm not trying to be mean or rude, you just need to protect yourself.

 

Included in first aid kit: poison control hotline number, local veterinary clinic number

 

You're better off teaching emergency situations. Here's some random examples that is by no means an all inclusive list or checked by anyone.

Severe bleeding

Fainting or losing consciousness

Obvious traumatic wounds

Anaphylactic shock

Seizure/convulsing

Bloat

Heat stroke

Etc, etc, etc - there's a lot more. Teach that it's always better to call and ask - usually a vet won't charge you a penny just to ask if your dog is experiencing an emergency. When they say yes or tell you to come in it's not so they can get your money, it's because you genuinely can't diagnose a thing without a full history and physical exam.

 

We did this seminar last year, at the invitation of GFNC. All we do is BASIC first aid, nothing more, therefore, it is not "practicing medicine without a license...." EVERYTHING in my part of the seminar was run past two veterinarians, too. No worries. Even when I was a paramedic, I always said ... "but I am not a doctor... you need to run your concerns past your physician.

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Guest speedoketo

OK I can't leave this unsaid. You could kill a dog if you keep giving them 2tbs of hydrogen peroxide until they vomit if you give too much. It messes with their acid/base balance. My vet told me horror stories of people killing their dogs this way on accident when they warned me about not doing it. Call before you do this to make sure it's appropriate and will be effective in the first place, vomiting is an unpleasant experience I'm sure your dog doesn't enjoy.

 

I'm not a vet. These are things my vet has warned me about. This website is for sharing information so I'm just passing on what they told me.

 

Call your veterinarian - they are happy to tell you if what you're doing is actually going to do more harm than good and they can probably give you some better ideas to try first over the phone before you have to come in.

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Guest Energy11

Call a vet and run this all by them. If a vet or animal control learns of you doing this without their consult they have every right to report you for practicing veterinary medicine without a license (which you are since you're recommending specific drugs and dosages and when to use them without a license). Practicing medicine without a license is illegal, and for good reason. A good vet would be thrilled to work with you and probably provide excellent suggestions about what to talk about and make sure you're legally in the clear (we live in a very litigious society). There are situations in which you would absolutely not want to give some of the drugs you listed which is why only licensed veterinarians are allowed to prescribe drugs and dosages. I've seen people kill their pets with the best of intentions with drugs they thought would work. To keep yourself from getting reported and sued you should never ever recommend drugs or doses! Ever! It's illegal!

 

My apologies if you've already gotten this ok'd by a vet or if you're certified in pet first aid. I'm not trying to be mean or rude, you just need to protect yourself.

 

Included in first aid kit: poison control hotline number, local veterinary clinic number

 

You're better off teaching emergency situations. Here's some random examples that is by no means an all inclusive list or checked by anyone.

Severe bleeding

Fainting or losing consciousness

Obvious traumatic wounds

Anaphylactic shock

Seizure/convulsing

Bloat

Heat stroke

Etc, etc, etc - there's a lot more. Teach that it's always better to call and ask - usually a vet won't charge you a penny just to ask if your dog is experiencing an emergency. When they say yes or tell you to come in it's not so they can get your money, it's because you genuinely can't diagnose a thing without a full history and physical exam.

 

Just an FYI ... I am a retired Florida State Certified Paramedic, and retired Florida Vet Tech. :-)

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Guest Energy11

Call a vet and run this all by them. If a vet or animal control learns of you doing this without their consult they have every right to report you for practicing veterinary medicine without a license (which you are since you're recommending specific drugs and dosages and when to use them without a license). Practicing medicine without a license is illegal, and for good reason. A good vet would be thrilled to work with you and probably provide excellent suggestions about what to talk about and make sure you're legally in the clear (we live in a very litigious society). There are situations in which you would absolutely not want to give some of the drugs you listed which is why only licensed veterinarians are allowed to prescribe drugs and dosages. I've seen people kill their pets with the best of intentions with drugs they thought would work. To keep yourself from getting reported and sued you should never ever recommend drugs or doses! Ever! It's illegal!

 

My apologies if you've already gotten this ok'd by a vet or if you're certified in pet first aid. I'm not trying to be mean or rude, you just need to protect yourself.

 

Included in first aid kit: poison control hotline number, local veterinary clinic number

 

You're better off teaching emergency situations. Here's some random examples that is by no means an all inclusive list or checked by anyone.

Severe bleeding

Fainting or losing consciousness

Obvious traumatic wounds

Anaphylactic shock

Seizure/convulsing

Bloat

Heat stroke

Etc, etc, etc - there's a lot more. Teach that it's always better to call and ask - usually a vet won't charge you a penny just to ask if your dog is experiencing an emergency. When they say yes or tell you to come in it's not so they can get your money, it's because you genuinely can't diagnose a thing without a full history and physical exam.

 

Just an FYI ... I am a retired Florida State Certified Paramedic, and retired Florida Vet Tech. :-)

 

The entire seminar does deal with things like wound care, broken toe nails, etc., etc., and yes, we ALWAYS recommend calling the vet, always. The things in this seminar are just BASIC FIRST AID things for people to do if they are out and about, or stuck on a weekend without vet.

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Guest Energy11

Animal Poison Control information:

 

http://www.workingdogs.com/doc0002.htm

 

Also, as the other poster has mentioned, THIS information, AND the number of your vet and E-vet, should be included in your first aid kit, OR, do as I do ... they are programmed into my phone.

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-CPR

 

-evaluating emergency and non-emergency situations

 

-dog and human medications to avoid or use for chronic or emergency situations

 

-normal and abnormal dog temperature and pulse rates

 

:)

 

For speedoketo:

I posted these talk ideas because they were all questions brought up during the last Mountain Hounds first aid seminar. Every time Dee and Karen would say to check with your vet first, which is the best advice. But I'll bet many vets are like my own - they refuse to give any suggestions on the phone. I've called Poison Control once and then followed up with a vet visit.

It always surprises me to hear questions posed by others, whether here or at Dee's seminar. Things that would be a no-brainer for me to do or not do, they had no clue about. I don't mean for that to read in a negative, uppity way.

 

Hada the podenco maneta, Georgie Girl (UMR Cordella), Lulu the podenco andaluz, Rita the podenco maneta
Angels: Charlie the iggy,  Mazy (CBR Crazy Girl), Potato, my mystery ibizan girl, Allen (M's Pretty Boy), Percy (Fast But True), Mikey (Doray's Patuti), Pudge le mutt, Tessa the iggy, Possum (Apostle), Gracie (Dusty Lady), Harold (Slatex Harold), "Cousin" Simon our step-iggy, Little Dude the iggy ,Bandit (Bb Blue Jay), Niña the galgo, Wally (Allen Hogg), Thane (Pog Mo Thoine), Oliver (JJ Special Agent), Comet, & Rosie our original mutt.

tiny hada siggy.png

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Guest Energy11

OK I can't leave this unsaid. You could kill a dog if you keep giving them 2tbs of hydrogen peroxide until they vomit if you give too much. It messes with their acid/base balance. My vet told me horror stories of people killing their dogs this way on accident when they warned me about not doing it. Call before you do this to make sure it's appropriate and will be effective in the first place, vomiting is an unpleasant experience I'm sure your dog doesn't enjoy.

 

I'm not a vet. These are things my vet has warned me about. This website is for sharing information so I'm just passing on what they told me.

 

Call your veterinarian - they are happy to tell you if what you're doing is actually going to do more harm than good and they can probably give you some better ideas to try first over the phone before you have to come in.

 

2 tablespoons of hydrogen peroxide is what is recommended for a greyhound-sized dog. You can find it anywhere on line, too. In the seminar, we talk more about this. One does not induce vomiting in a dog or person who has ingested an acid or alkaline, or if the dog has swallowed anything sharp. If you check with your vet, or any vet, using hydrogen peroxide IS the first line in emergency treatment, for ingestions not acid, alkaline or sharp. This is also recommended by Animal Poison Control.

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OK I can't leave this unsaid. You could kill a dog if you keep giving them 2tbs of hydrogen peroxide until they vomit if you give too much. It messes with their acid/base balance. My vet told me horror stories of people killing their dogs this way on accident when they warned me about not doing it. Call before you do this to make sure it's appropriate and will be effective in the first place, vomiting is an unpleasant experience I'm sure your dog doesn't enjoy.

 

I'm not a vet. These are things my vet has warned me about. This website is for sharing information so I'm just passing on what they told me.

 

Call your veterinarian - they are happy to tell you if what you're doing is actually going to do more harm than good and they can probably give you some better ideas to try first over the phone before you have to come in.

 

2 tablespoons of hydrogen peroxide is what is recommended for a greyhound-sized dog. You can find it anywhere on line, too. In the seminar, we talk more about this. One does not induce vomiting in a dog or person who has ingested an acid or alkaline, or if the dog has swallowed anything sharp. If you check with your vet, or any vet, using hydrogen peroxide IS the first line in emergency treatment, for ingestions not acid, alkaline or sharp. This is also recommended by Animal Poison Control.

 

:nod

Claudia-noo-siggie.jpg

Missing my little Misty who took a huge piece of my heart with her on 5/2/09, and Ekko, on 6/28/12

 

 

:candle For the sick, the lost, and the homeless

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Hey, Dee, I won't be at Mountain Hounds but something that comes up here a lot is how to pill a dog when the dog doesn't wanna. Maybe some folks would even volunteer their easygoing dogs for those who want to try it and see how to open the mouth, how far down you can stuff that pill, etc.

 

Another one would be how to keep dog still for vetting -1- when you're on your own, and -2- when you have a helper.

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the proper cautions which it sounds like will be covered, things like hydrogen peroxide, benadryl, Gas-X, direct pressure to stop bleeding, etc. can be lifesavers when people can't get hold of a vet.

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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Guest Energy11

Hey, Dee, I won't be at Mountain Hounds but something that comes up here a lot is how to pill a dog when the dog doesn't wanna. Maybe some folks would even volunteer their easygoing dogs for those who want to try it and see how to open the mouth, how far down you can stuff that pill, etc.

 

Another one would be how to keep dog still for vetting -1- when you're on your own, and -2- when you have a helper.

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the proper cautions which it sounds like will be covered, things like hydrogen peroxide, benadryl, Gas-X, direct pressure to stop bleeding, etc. can be lifesavers when people can't get hold of a vet.

 

Thanks for the GREYT suggestions! FYI, EVERYONE, I ran the "First Aid Kit, Must Haves" ... past a Florida State Licensed Veterinarian AGAIN today, and it was ALL APPROVED! I have the email to prove such.

 

EVERYTHING presented at this seminar, will be run past, and approved by a licensed veterinarian. Hope to see you there!

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest Energy11

Just "bumping" this post up, so you can see the update in post #1.

 

It is very important to pack everything you need for you and your dog, especially all prescription, and NON PRESCRIPTION medications! Bringing bottled water is a good idea, as well as pumpkin (**IF you can find it), to help with The Big D.

 

See you there! Dee

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