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Avoiding Dentals


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Neyla had her vet visit with Dr. Canapp, the sports medicine orthopedist today. I asked him to take a quick look in her mouth to rule out any weird issue that might have just popped up that could be contributing to her eating habits of late and yet again I got a compliment on how wonderful her teeth are. This time, instead of commenting that I clearly brushed daily (what my vet said at our annual exam last month), he commented that she must have just had a dental! I was pleased to be able to tell him that at age 8 she's never had one and that it's entirely due to her raw diet.

 

I just wanted to share as I often see people talking about ways to avoid having their dogs go under for a dental. Even if you aren't comfortable feeding raw all of the time, weekly bones can be a great way to clean teeth and give your dog's some enrichment. That's my plug for the day. :P

 

Jen

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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Guest smarthound

After reading all the benefits of RMB, I'm convinced. Now I just need to find a grocery store that sells them. I asked my local store for turkey necks today and they told me "only at Thanksgiving". So where do all the turkey necks go the rest of the year????

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After reading all the benefits of RMB, I'm convinced. Now I just need to find a grocery store that sells them. I asked my local store for turkey necks today and they told me "only at Thanksgiving". So where do all the turkey necks go the rest of the year????

 

I recommend chicken quarters over turkey necks anyway - much better bone:meat ratio. You can order them by the case from Whole Foods, usually at a discounted price (depending on your store). I pay about $1.10/lb.

gallery_12662_3351_862.jpg

Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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Neyla had her vet visit with Dr. Canapp, the sports medicine orthopedist today. I asked him to take a quick look in her mouth to rule out any weird issue that might have just popped up that could be contributing to her eating habits of late and yet again I got a compliment on how wonderful her teeth are. This time, instead of commenting that I clearly brushed daily (what my vet said at our annual exam last month), he commented that she must have just had a dental! I was pleased to be able to tell him that at age 8 she's never had one and that it's entirely due to her raw diet.

 

I just wanted to share as I often see people talking about ways to avoid having their dogs go under for a dental. Even if you aren't comfortable feeding raw all of the time, weekly bones can be a great way to clean teeth and give your dog's some enrichment. That's my plug for the day. :P

 

Jen

 

Help me to understand this then... I don't mean for my tone to be anything other then totally mystified.

 

I just adopted my 4th GH yesterday, Polli, an 8.5 year old brood mama off a farm in KS. She has not eaten anything but raw up until she came off the hauler on Sunday night.

She has never had a dental and her teeth as SOOOOOOOOOOOOOO bad that the vet would not touch her until she had a round of amoxoxcillian, she will probably lose most of her teeth, her breath could knock ANYONE over, it smells as though there is an abcess which is prob gum disease. There is black smelly SLIME that actually comes out of her mouth. Nice huh?

 

I realize that this is partially hereditary but since she was on only raw, what would make her teeth so bad?

 

 

ROBIN ~ Mom to: Beau Think It Aint, Chloe JC Allthewayhome, Teddy ICU Drunk Sailor, Elsie N Fracine , Ollie RG's Travertine, Ponch A's Jupiter~ Yoshi, Zoobie & Belle, the kitties.

Waiting at the bridge Angel Polli Bohemian Ocean , Rocky, Blue,Sasha & Zoobie & Bobbi

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Help me to understand this then... I don't mean for my tone to be anything other then totally mystified.

 

I just adopted my 4th GH yesterday, Polli, an 8.5 year old brood mama off a farm in KS. She has not eaten anything but raw up until she came off the hauler on Sunday night.

She has never had a dental and her teeth as SOOOOOOOOOOOOOO bad that the vet would not touch her until she had a round of amoxoxcillian, she will probably lose most of her teeth, her breath could knock ANYONE over, it smells as though there is an abcess which is prob gum disease. There is black smelly SLIME that actually comes out of her mouth. Nice huh?

 

I realize that this is partially hereditary but since she was on only raw, what would make her teeth so bad?

 

Honestly, hard to say not knowing what her raw diet was. I should have specified that I feed a diet of RMBs and organ meat. There are certainly health benefits to feeding a ground raw for instance, but the teeth cleaning benefits wouldn't be there. I also think the cleaning benefits from the types of bones I feed - whole lamb necks, cow feet (as a recreational item), whole chickens, etc. are much better than say chicken necks. I find it pretty hard to believe a dog with teeth in such poor shape could actually eat those types of bones, but I'm probably wrong. In the end, it's probably just really poor genetics.

 

FYI, Neyla's teeth were in poor shape when she came off the track as well and my vet wanted to do a dental, but a year later he reported that they were great and didn't need it. That was 4 years ago. Tons of similar anecdotal evidence out there. Also plenty of dogs not fed raw who have healthy teeth (again, genetics imo) but I think many dogs that DO have dentals could avoid it, or have them much less frequently if they were fed raw bones at least on occasion. With the risks of anesthesia, especially for greyhounds, I just like to encourage people to consider it. It may not work for every dog, but it will at least help for many if not most. :)

 

 

gallery_12662_3351_862.jpg

Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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How great to hear that, especially from a vet! :D

 

I have to say that Mayhem's teeth are much cleaner now than when we first adopted him, and he had a dental (along with his neuter) just before we got him.

 

I strongly suspect that most kennels use ground meat for their hounds. I have read about those who mix ground beef in with kibble to increase protein, so I'm not sure how many places actually feed a completely raw diet. But if they do feed a complete raw diet, the bone component (which cannot be omitted) must be either ground or really small bones. Just the mechanics of chewing on bones scrapes and cleans teeth, I don't think you can really avoid it. Some people believe that the enzymes in raw help to clean the teeth (meaning that ground would have benefits also) but I don't buy into that so much. Only a call to the farm will tell you for sure what Polli was fed exactly. I hope her toofers feel better soon though!

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Neyla had her vet visit with Dr. Canapp, the sports medicine orthopedist today. I asked him to take a quick look in her mouth to rule out any weird issue that might have just popped up that could be contributing to her eating habits of late and yet again I got a compliment on how wonderful her teeth are. This time, instead of commenting that I clearly brushed daily (what my vet said at our annual exam last month), he commented that she must have just had a dental! I was pleased to be able to tell him that at age 8 she's never had one and that it's entirely due to her raw diet.

 

I just wanted to share as I often see people talking about ways to avoid having their dogs go under for a dental. Even if you aren't comfortable feeding raw all of the time, weekly bones can be a great way to clean teeth and give your dog's some enrichment. That's my plug for the day. :P

 

Jen

 

Help me to understand this then... I don't mean for my tone to be anything other then totally mystified.

 

I just adopted my 4th GH yesterday, Polli, an 8.5 year old brood mama off a farm in KS. She has not eaten anything but raw up until she came off the hauler on Sunday night.

She has never had a dental and her teeth as SOOOOOOOOOOOOOO bad that the vet would not touch her until she had a round of amoxoxcillian, she will probably lose most of her teeth, her breath could knock ANYONE over, it smells as though there is an abcess which is prob gum disease. There is black smelly SLIME that actually comes out of her mouth. Nice huh?

 

I realize that this is partially hereditary but since she was on only raw, what would make her teeth so bad?

 

Do you know exactly what she was fed? It is possible it was a combo of meat and kibble and not with the bones that help keep the teeth clean.

Greyhound angels at the bridge- Casey, Charlie, Maggie, Molly, Renie, Lucy & Teddy. Beagle angels Peanut and Charlie. And to all the 4 legged Bridge souls who have touched my heart, thank you. When a greyhound looks into you eyes it seems they touch your very soul.

"A dog is the only thing on earth that loves you more then he loves himself". Josh Billings

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