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Misbehavior In The Crate And At Home Alone.


Guest mmcdonough
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Guest mmcdonough

So we recently adopted a new greyhound named Sweetie. She's still kind of a puppy, only about 16 months old. We had some really bad potty accidents in the house the first few weeks but we've been excessively praising her every time she goes outside and there hasn't been an accident outside of the crate for almost two weeks now.

 

The problem has been that neither of us can be home during most of the day. I make it home for lunch after she's been kenneled for 4 hours and let her out but then I put her right back in and she barks and wines a lot as I'm leaving. We tried to leave her out and muzzle her, but she ended up ripping the muzzle off and eating half of it along with a large, unidentifiable piece of clothing. After that vet visit we've been hesitant to leave her out again. The main issue now is that she keeps peeing in her kennel while we're gone during the day and ripping apart her bedding. I am wondering if I should be restricting her water intake in the morning and at lunch because when we let her out she starts drinking like a horse at a trough!

 

We have a small Italian greyhound that can keep her company and we usually leave him out because he's really good about not getting into trouble while we're gone but the two of them together could potentially wreak havoc. Does anyone have any suggestions?!

 

 

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She's still a puppy and learning the ropes. She's recently adopted so she's still getting used to all the new things in her surroundings. I personally would continue with crating (I wholeheartedly believe crating makes a good dog - but this certainly isn't the case for a dog that is hurting itself and trying to get out or might be experiencing SA - which I don't think you are experiencing IMO). If you can continue for a little while to go home at lunch to help her eliminate that would be good too. Indeed restrict water before crating. I've learned that it takes about an hour after a drink for it to hit their bladder and for them to need to pee. So an hour before you need to leave, offer water and then take it away - at least for now (and limit activity then too so the need to drink is also lessened)....she needs to build up her bladder of steel - but not all dogs are able to develop this. Ensure that she has fully and completely emptied her bladder before you re-crate her. Don't forget that a tired dog is also a happy dog. Make sure she's getting good walks to release all of her energy so she doesn't destroy the bedding in her crate.

 

Many greys (and dogs for that matter) spend hours at home alone while their hoomins are earning a wage to supply them with amazing toys and treats and food. You'll get there, but it's premature at this point to expect much from your pup without consistent routine - just keep at it and don't let a step back deter you. More people I'm sure will chime in to give you advice. This is a greyt board :welcome

Edited by XTRAWLD

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Guest GreyOrchard

Yes, she needs to get out of the crate. It's too much for her and she is showing signs of real distress. She likely will soon start developing neurotic behaviour. I don't think it's her being a misbehaving bad dog...I think she can't take it anymore.

 

Let her be out of the crate in a limited part of the house and "puppy-safe" that part of the house. Let her have the other dog as company.

 

BUT most important....for the first few weeks you do this, get up an hour early and take her on an exhausting walk. Sure, you will be exhausted too, but you can coffee-up and fuel-up for the rest of the day. She will want to sleep. The first week, take her on a one hour walk. The second week, 45 minutes, and so on, down to no walking needed at all. By doing this, you are "setting her up" for good behaviour for the rest of the day and the rest of her life. A few weeks of this extra walking will be well worth it in the short run AND the long run. It's not for forever, just a few weeks.

Edited by GreyOrchard
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I think you need to identify if the behaviour is due to anxiety/separation anxiety vs. lack of exercise/stimulation.

 

Young greyhounds are very energetic and need to run, play and get out every day. How much exercise does your pup get before you leave her?

Edited by RedHead
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I'd take her for a long walk before you go to work, do that for a few days and see if anything changes... If not then I'd find out ways she can be safe and out of the crate, maybe a few xpens set up so she can room to play but not get into mischief.

 

My boy who is 3yo and still rather active compared to his grey friends who are a year or two older, can go on a 2 mile brisk hike and still come home to race around. I take him for a 15 -20 minute jog/walk in the morning (more me tiring then HIM). Then again at night time. He still plays like a lunatic during the day. So if mine is like that then a puppy is going to need to be worned out even more.

Plus toys, have you given a kong with treats inside? OR a hard plastic nylabone?

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I know that some people leave their dogs crated while they are working all day but I've never felt comfortable with crating for that length of time regularly. They are crated at the track of course but they also get plenty of turnouts and interaction with people/other dogs so it's not like being in a quiet house crated for hours at a time. To me she sounds bored and frustrated, and it sure must be difficult for her to go back in the crate when you come home to let her out at midday. I would personally try some of the suggestions above, like gating her into a certain area or perhaps even an ex-pen to give her a bit more room and variety. She may be having to go more because she's up a lot and stressed versus being relaxed/asleep.

 

Those are my thoughts :), hope you can figure out a solution!

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You have a serious situation on your hands - not to be taken lightly. When you find ripped up bedding you have a dog that is absolutely losing it in the crate, in complete distress. This is no mischievous chewing.

 

The advice above about exercise is sound - the more the better. Get rid of the crate, and attach the muzzle to the collar. There are ways to keep the muzzle on. You may find that with the right amount of exercise you won't need the muzzle. Follow standard alone training protocols.

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Never restrict a dog's access to water. In some states, that's considered animal cruelty.

 

You need to make sure she's getting plenty of exercise. Note: letting her out in the back yard is not exercise. You need to either walk her, or find a game she likes that gets her running around.

 

Work on alone training (see the booklet "I'll Be Home Soon" by Patricia McConnell for full details). Work on more exercise. Consider a DAP diffuser for the home. Get a Kong and when you leave her, but ONLY when you leave her, give it to her with something yummy lining the inside of the hole (like peanut butter (do not use any with artificial sweetener)). Many of us have been through this, and it's a phase, and if you deal with it properly it'll pass soon enough!


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