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Growling Question


Guest jupiterooos
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Guest jupiterooos

We don't have a lot of growling around here these days, but occasionally there is some unrest in the peanut gallery. Both of us know not to punish a dog for growling, that's obvious - but what about consequences?

 

I explain now. For example, when Angler slept on our bed (he's been banished for a number of reasons unrelated to growling) he would usually end up occupying two-thirds of a king-size mattress. Most of the time he would reposition himself without grumbling, but once in a while he'd growl. We didn't reprimand him, but instead firmly told him to get off. Or when Jupiter occasionally gets growly about wanting to occupy a certain floor space and not let us step over him - same thing, we firmly tell him to get up and move. And they do. But what I'm wondering is, are consequences for a growl sending the same message as punishing a growl?! I'm feeling a bit worried about this all of a sudden, as I certainly do not want them to stop issuing a warning when they feel uncomfortable! Thoughts?

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Guest Drumhellergrey

Mine doesn't growl much either, but if is is over possessiveness, there should be a consequence. I wouldn't worry about him stopping to growl in the future, as a result of there being a consequence, as it is their nature to do this as a warning, and they will continue to do so.

 

So in short, you did the right thing. I hope this help ease your worry. :)

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Jilly has on occasion a kind of grumbly growl. A sort of muttering under her breath grumpy growl. It's not a lip curling, I feel in any way threatened growl. For that. I kind of laugh at her and tell her knock it off you old grump. She will reposition herself and all is fine.

 

If it is ever anymore than that, then without over reacting, she is asked to get off into her own bed please! Which she does ASAP. And she gets a good girl for obeying that command. I am not about to share my close space with a growling dog. Period. But I don't punish her. So I don't feel I am shutting down communication at all.

gallery_7628_2929_17259.jpg

Susan, Jessie and Jordy NORTHERN SKY GREYHOUND ADOPTION ASSOCIATION

Jack, in my heart forever March 1999-Nov 21, 2008 My Dancing Queen Jilly with me always and forever Aug 12, 2003-Oct 15, 2010

Joshy I will love you always Aug 1, 2004-Feb 22,2013 Jonah my sweetheart May 2000 - Jan 2015

" You will never need to be alone again. I promise this. As your dog, I will sing this promise to you, and whisper it to you at night, every night, with my breath." Stanley Coren

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Guest Ashleigh

Isn't asking them to get off the bed after a growl the same as a punishment for growling? If they hadn't growled, then they would still be on the bed. Regardless, I believe you did the right thing as well. They need to know that it's your bed first and you're the one allowing them to use it...whatever space they get from it.

 

I have always punished a bark, and have never been bit. I don't get growled at anymore and everything in the house respected as mine first. I don't understand the "no punishing a growl" idea. I think of it like back-sass from a child and no parent would put up with that. :lol

Edited by Ashleigh
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I don't understand the "no punishing a growl" idea. I think of it like back-sass from a child and no parent would put up with that. :lol

A child can and should be expected to speak politely. A dog cannot speak to you and is pretty limited in ways to communicate displeasure. A growl is a legitimate and safer expression of unhappiness or pain than a bite.

Edited by Jackandgrey

gallery_7628_2929_17259.jpg

Susan, Jessie and Jordy NORTHERN SKY GREYHOUND ADOPTION ASSOCIATION

Jack, in my heart forever March 1999-Nov 21, 2008 My Dancing Queen Jilly with me always and forever Aug 12, 2003-Oct 15, 2010

Joshy I will love you always Aug 1, 2004-Feb 22,2013 Jonah my sweetheart May 2000 - Jan 2015

" You will never need to be alone again. I promise this. As your dog, I will sing this promise to you, and whisper it to you at night, every night, with my breath." Stanley Coren

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Guest Ashleigh
I don't understand the "no punishing a growl" idea. I think of it like back-sass from a child and no parent would put up with that. :lol

A child can and should be expected to speak politely. A dog cannot speak to you and is pretty limited in ways to communicate displeasure. A growl is a legitimate and safer expression of unhappiness or pain than a bite.

 

A passive, obedient, and well behaved respectful dog will not growl at their owner. There are many ways a dog will communicate with us...for example, tail between the legs, whimpering, pawingm. A growl is saying, "I don't like what you're doing and I'm going to tell you what I want from you". Its our job to tell them what we want, not the other way around.

 

Our goals should be to have a respectful animal in our homes. Allowing them to be the boss only escalates into far larger issues.

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I don't understand the "no punishing a growl" idea. I think of it like back-sass from a child and no parent would put up with that. :lol

A child can and should be expected to speak politely. A dog cannot speak to you and is pretty limited in ways to communicate displeasure. A growl is a legitimate and safer expression of unhappiness or pain than a bite.

 

Exactly.

 

If somebody's resource guarding here and there's no pleasant way to defuse the situation, I'm likely to remove the resource -- ask the dog to get off the sofa, put the contended toy away, separate better next time I give chewies, etc. -- but I'm not going to yell at the dog or angrily drag him/her off the bed. That just confirms there was something to be nervous and defensive about in the first place, and next time is likely to be worse.

 

Sometimes I might not take any action at all. For example, Joseph would occasionally growl at Zema if she was trying to nest away the blanket that he was lying on. Can't see correcting that -- he told her to cut that out, she got the message, perfectly natural communication.

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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Guest Sunset123

Jilly has on occasion a kind of grumbly growl. A sort of muttering under her breath grumpy growl. It's not a lip curling, I feel in any way threatened growl. For that. I kind of laugh at her and tell her knock it off you old grump. She will reposition herself and all is fine.

 

 

Same with Arrisa. It's not a threatening growl, just a grumpy, bratty one. I'm not too concerned about it, because she's just telling me "I don't like that." I just tell her, "hey" or "don't" or something.

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