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Guest GroomerGirl

She Wont Stop Pacing!

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Guest GroomerGirl

Hi! My husband and I just adopted a greyhound yesterday(my birthday gift :colgate , I've wanted one for so long now) and are absolutely loving having her in our home. She is has been pretty jumpy but is slowly warming up. My only concern is that she just wont stop pacing! She walks from one room to another for a few minutes until she finally settles in and lays down. If she hears any sudden noises or my other dog starts barking at something(which he does quite often!) she will quickly get up and start pacing. A couple times I think it has been because she needs to be let out because I will take her outside and she'll instantly go to the bathroom. But the rest of the time I have no idea whats going on or how to settle her down. I'm assuming this is just a nervous habbit, I mean, we've only had her for a day, I can't blame her for feeling uncomfertable. But its actually starting to drive my other dog nuts! It makes him nervous to the point he starts to growl at her. I work with dogs for a living (i'm a groomer) so I am used to seeing a lot of nervous behavior, but I have never worked around a greyhound. I was wondering if this will go away and if this is a common thing with the breed.

I have a lot of experience with dogs but not with greyhounds so I think I am extra nervous about getting her to adapt and feel comfertable. I just adore her so much already and want her to be happy!

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Guest Swifthounds

She sounds like she's settling in and acclimating to all the new sounds, smells, and goings on in her new (and to her, very foreign) environment. This is all new to her and is a lot to take in all at once. I would concentrate on not getting excited or worried when she wanders, paces, etc. (other than reacting as needed for potty breaks). The less excited everyone else is over things, the more likely she is to gradually become accustomed to the sights, sounds, and smells of her new environment. She's reacting, but she's also judging your reaction and the reaction of your other dog. The more you take these new things in stride, the more likely she will follow suit.

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Guest Adrianne

I agree with the others that it's just the newness of her surroundings. Give her a few days, and she'll settle.

 

 

When we brought Larry home, he paced for two days straight. I got zero sleep the first night, and I know he had to be exhausted by the third day; I was. Others suggested Rescue Remedy for him, and I have found it to be effective for my boy.

 

Just stay calm and know it's temporary.

 

And welcome to the wonderful world of greyhounds.

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Guest windycove

Just give her some time. Remember, ALL of this is new to her. I found that if I treated my greys like a 1 1/2 year old baby who knows NOTHING, and gently taught them all about their new home and family they did greyt! Greys love to check out every room and everything. If you haven't read Greyhounds for Dummies, do it now. Be sure to put LOCKED padlocks on all fence gates and open the outside doors with your girl on lead.

Lots of great info here on Greytalk.

Congratulations on your girl!

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Guest IrskasMom

WELCOME to GT :wave:wave:wave Relax and give it some Time. It will all come together.

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Greyhounds can be incredibly nervous when they first find themselves in a home, it's so different to what they've been used to. Your girl is lucky to have another dog around to help her settle, but she is obviously finding it hard.

 

I have two suggestions. First, try plugging in a DAP diffuser - I think they're called 'Comfort Zone' in the US? You probably know about these already, but they use synthetic Dog Appeasing Pheromones to reassure dogs on a subliminal level. Secondly, use your knowledge of dogs and the way they behave to 'take charge', because sometimes all they need to know is that someone knows what they're doing.

 

It's not unknown for them to pace like this, but it isn't the norm, so your girl may be at the more nervy end of the spectrum. I had one once who was particularly prone to anxiety all his life, but all he needed was to have someone to rely on who would take the lead. The first day we brought him home he came up with all kinds of displacement activity, including standing in the middle of the room 'air-humping'. I'd never had a dog do this before, and automatically directed him to his bed. He probably had no idea what I was saying, but my body language and voice let him know and he settled almost immediately (with what looked like a sigh of relief!).

 

This approach isn't right for all dogs, but it works with some. Certainly it does no harm to behave like 'top dog' in situations like this, which (as you'll know) doesn't mean throwing your weight around and making unreasonable demands on a new and scared dog, but just ... well, remaining calm, keeping your body language confident and your voice level, and trying to make things as ordinary as possible. What you don't need to be doing is the 'poor dog' thing, because it makes them feel there's really something to be worried about.

 

She's probably too distracted right now, but when she has had a few days to settle in and stopped the pacing, you might find she's a dog who'll benefit from having something on hand to chew. I use good quality smoked bones, but kongs are good for those who'll use them. :)


GTAvatar-2015_zpsb0oqcimj.jpg

The plural of anecdote is not data

Brambleberry Greyhounds My Etsy Shop

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Guest barkdogs

If you haven't already done so, how about some good extra long walks? I have found that exercise works wonders at time for anxiety (mine too!)--also the mental stimulation of getting out and looking around.

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Not to worry. All my pups paced for days when we first got them! Walkies and just following your routine will settle her in.


 

 

ROBIN ~ Mom to: Beau Think It Aint, Chloe JC Allthewayhome, Teddy ICU Drunk Sailor, Elsie N Fracine , Ollie RG's Travertine, Ponch A's Jupiter~ Yoshi, Zoobie & Belle, the kitties.

Waiting at the bridge Angel Polli Bohemian Ocean , Rocky, Blue,Sasha & Zoobie & Bobbi

Greyhound Angels Adoption (GAA) The Lexus Project

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Guest kydie

walk, walk, walk, walk, for your hound, it is like taking you to South America, and leaving you in a beautiful new home, nice people, but you don't know what they are saying to you, differnt food, different surroundings, none of your friends around, and someone saying,(in a language you don't understand) nice here, huh? Give the pup time, you and she will be just fine :) but walk, walk, walk :)

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Guest boondog

Congratulations on your adoption! We'd love to see some pictures of your new girl. This article written by Kathleen Gilley pretty much sums up everything she's feeling. Don't worry, she'll be fine.

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Guest GroomerGirl

Thanks for the reissurance! I've owned dogs before but every time I get a new one it feels like i'm starting over! She's getting better all the time, I just need to keep calm!

The night we adopted our last dog he didn't want to do anything, he wasn't excited about going outside to play in the yard or go for walks. I guess each dog handles the transition differently.

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Guest mountain4greys

Everyone else is correct, your new hound is stressed because she hasn't settled in yet. The pacing will go away.

 

We tell people from time to time, you might have had dogs before, but never a greyhound.

 

Greyhounds are different, and that's what makes them so special. But don't worry, she'll adapt quickly. :)

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Guest spider9174

With fosters, in the first few days I have them they get anxious just because everything is new to them. I'll find them pacing, panting, drinking extra water, or a combination of those. Usually, if the pacing persists, I will put the pup in the crate until he settles for 20-30 minutes. This usually does the trick.

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