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Growling & Snapping


Guest laurengrey
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Guest laurengrey

There's a greyhound that needs adopting. It was already at a Foster home for 3 wks and at the Foster home they found out that it was very possessive of his toys. On one occasion the father walked into the living room. The grey was lying down with a toy near him. When the father walked in the room it jumped up, growled & snapped (but not biting him). Then on other occasions even when the dog was in the hallway with a toy and someone went near the hallway, it would growl. The greyhound was going to be going to a home with 2 small children but because it was showing this behavior it was decided that he wouldn't be a good fit. Now we're considering fostering him with intent to possibly adopt. He's a really sweet dog but he does exhibit this behavior. Do you think that this is something that we could train him not to do? We want to have children in 2 years so we're hesitant about adopting him if he might bite. What do you think?

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I honestly think there are other greyhounds out there who are better suited to live in a home with children in the future. He would do better in a quiet household. If he is in foster care right now then he's living in a home environment and doesn't know/care whether his legal status is adopted or fostered.

 

I would be honest with the group that you intend to have children they will probably steer you to other dogs as well.

Colleen with Covey (Admirals Cove) and Rally (greyhound puppy)
Missing my beloved boy INU (CJ Whistlindixie) my sweetest princess SALEM (CJ Little Dixie) and my baby girl ZOE (LR's Tara)

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:nod Absolutely, totally agree with inugrey... There are other dogs that you can help foster... and possibly adopt. :)

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~Beth, with a crazy mixed crew of misfits.
~ Forever and Always missing and loving Steak, Carmen, Ivy, Isis, and Madi.
Don't cry because it's ended, Smile because it happened.
Before you judge me, try to keep an open mind, not everyone likes your taste.

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

While I do agree that there are other hounds that could benifit from fostering, this behavior is something that could be corrected. It is very common for greyhounds to exhibit this behavior as they have never had possesions in their life. Suddenly they have them and they dont want them taken away. There is no difference between a hound guarding its toy, a bone, or even someone petting it, it is resource guarding, plain and simple. If you dont plan on having kids for 2 years, there is MORE than enough time to quell this behavior. The hound is just getting used to home life, this is really not that big of an issue to tackle. Actually, the foster dad should have put a stop to the behavior. Just about every hound that I have had come through my house, foster and my own alike at one time grumbled about a toy, or a bone. No biggie, they just have to learn, thats all. I dont think that this hound would be a poor canidate for a family with children, after it is fostered in a home that is able to correct the guarding behavior. I know there will be people that disagree with me, so understand that when it comes to behavioral issues, nobody is all knowing, I could very well be wrong.

 

Chad

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Guest TeddysMom

IMHO there are a lot of homes that this grey would fit into nicely with more experienced grey owners. I would not set this dog or yourself up for failure knowing that he has already exhibided this behvior. I would go with a proven child safe grey since you are planning a family. To me it would be like bringing a cat aggressive dog into your home when you have cats and hoping that you could train the behavior out of him/her.

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Guest Harry702

While I do agree that there are other hounds that could benifit from fostering, this behavior is something that could be corrected. It is very common for greyhounds to exhibit this behavior as they have never had possesions in their life. Suddenly they have them and they dont want them taken away. There is no difference between a hound guarding its toy, a bone, or even someone petting it, it is resource guarding, plain and simple. If you dont plan on having kids for 2 years, there is MORE than enough time to quell this behavior. The hound is just getting used to home life, this is really not that big of an issue to tackle. Actually, the foster dad should have put a stop to the behavior. Just about every hound that I have had come through my house, foster and my own alike at one time grumbled about a toy, or a bone. No biggie, they just have to learn, thats all. I dont think that this hound would be a poor canidate for a family with children, after it is fostered in a home that is able to correct the guarding behavior. I know there will be people that disagree with me, so understand that when it comes to behavioral issues, nobody is all knowing, I could very well be wrong.

 

Chad

 

Very good point.

 

While I think it's great that you're planning ahead, also realize that there are no guarantees in life. Harry was a little growly when we first adopted him.. some of it was space guarding and some was resource guarding. We've managed to largely work through it, but it's still something we know he has a tendency towards. None of this was presented to us before we adopted him (not the foster's fault... just the way it worked out). Believe me when I say he's nearly a perfect dog... except for this issue. It only comes up for us again now as we are starting to have kids, and we know we need to be extra aware of Harry's limitations. At this point, he's family and we love him, faults and all, and we'll do what it takes to make it work for everyone (and it may not take all that much, who knows?) No one is perfect... not Harry... not me.. not the new baby.

 

Two years is a bit of a ways off... I'd adopt the dog that picks you or you decide is right for your home... if you pick right, and work at the things that might need work, it will work out okay.

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

IMHO there are a lot of homes that this grey would fit into nicely with more experienced grey owners. I would not set this dog or yourself up for failure knowing that he has already exhibided this behvior. I would go with a proven child safe grey since you are planning a family. To me it would be like bringing a cat aggressive dog into your home when you have cats and hoping that you could train the behavior out of him/her.

 

 

There is a distinct difference between resource guarding and inherent prey drive. You cant compare the two. Thats a scare tactic.

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Guest TeddysMom

IMHO there are a lot of homes that this grey would fit into nicely with more experienced grey owners. I would not set this dog or yourself up for failure knowing that he has already exhibided this behvior. I would go with a proven child safe grey since you are planning a family. To me it would be like bringing a cat aggressive dog into your home when you have cats and hoping that you could train the behavior out of him/her.

 

 

There is a distinct difference between resource guarding and inherent prey drive. You cant compare the two. Thats a scare tactic.

 

If you noticed, this was just my opinion, not a scare tactic. There have been several greys that have snapped or bit babies lately and unless the new family is willing to put the work and training into this dog, which is hard for first time owners, then it is a accident waiting to happen. This is only my opinion and that is what the op asked for, people's opinions.

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If you're considering fostering and don't have children at this time, I don't see how there would be a problem.

 

I would find it really hard to pass judgement on this dog without knowing more.

 

Some foster homes don't have much experience, and even when they do, there's no telling when the foster home just doesn't feel like a secure spot to that dog. Could be he feels threatened by a person/other animal there and that wouldn't occur in another home.

 

If the dog was indeed that possessive of toys after a few days in the home, I'd probably do some "trade up" games every day so that he learns when people approach, even when people take something away, good things happen.

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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