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Cancer In Greys


Guest Courtney
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Guest Courtney

My apologies in advance, I know this is a touchy subject for Grey owners, but I've been browsing and seeing all these threads about Greys with cancer. From what I understand, it's common. Is that assumption correct, and what kind of cancer(s) is most common? Bone? Oral? Tissue?

 

I'm no stranger to cancer in pets. My hedgehog was diagnosed with an osteosarcoma in her front leg in April 2006. In August 2006, the cancer disappeared and the vet had no idea how or why it happened. She underwent x-rays, biopsies, and ultrasounds, and ultimately, amputation was suggested. I opted against amputation and chose to just keep her comfortable.

 

Story aside, I know cancer is a difficult subject to talk about, but I was rather curious about it. What age do *most* Greys seem to be diagnosed with it? Is it generally a senior dog's afflication, or does it just strike whatever age, whenever? How do you go about dealing with it? In my hedgehog, I had to limit her exercise and soak her foot just to provide a little relief because I opted against surgeries of any type. She never really had bad days, but do you find your dogs have bad days and good days? What do you do in these instances?

 

The rate of cancer isn't a deterrant for me in the least. I've dealt with it once and I'll likely deal with it again as hedgehogs are very prone to cancers of all kinds. It's heartbreaking, but I feel like I should know everything there is to know about anything Greyhound related, just so I can maybe prevent certain strains of it (such as spaying to reduce the risk of uterine cancers).

 

Thank you in advance, and again, I apologize for asking such a touchy question.

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My apologies in advance, I know this is a touchy subject for Grey owners, but I've been browsing and seeing all these threads about Greys with cancer. From what I understand, it's common. Is that assumption correct, and what kind of cancer(s) is most common? Bone? Oral? Tissue?

 

From:

 

http://www.vet.ohio-state.edu/2096.htm

 

"Osteosarcomas (OSAs) are the most common primary bone neoplasm in dogs and the most common tumor in Greyhounds in the United Kingdom, where it accounted for 50% of all tumors, and for 22% of the deaths in the breed (www.gurk.demon.co.uk /ghsurvey). Cancer in general (44%), and OSA in particular (22%) were the leading cause of death in the breed. They can affect either the appendicular or axial skeletons, and occur primarily in large (and giant)–breed, middle age–to-older dogs. Preferential locations for OSA include the distal radius, proximal humerus, and distal femur, although they can occur in any bone or location."

Coco (Maze Cocodrillo)

Minerva (Kid's Snipper)

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at the emergency vet i read an article 25-50% of all dogs will die of cancer

at the dr cuoto's seminar in dewey if i am remembering correctly there is a higher instance of osto in racing greyhounds then akc & galgos

we are a tight group of grey lovers so we are in contact with each other more

our kerry blue died of cancer but i had no place to come to talk about her disease

 

Iris

www.ligc.org

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Everything has to die from something. Greyhounds are a VERY long lived breed, given their size, and yes, cancer does happen.

 

The cancers that raise eyebrows as being "unusual" are those that strike fairly young- age 6ish-9ish. Osteosarcoma and hemangiosarcoma are the ones that tend to crop up at a relatively young age. Anecdotally, they still occur less often (at least from my own experience) than in other breeds of similar size (I've seen WAY more OS in Golden Retrievers and Boxers and more hemangios in Goldens, Labs and mixes than in Greyhounds). Heart failure is also sometimes pointed out as a "greyhound thing".... yes it can happen, but it's also frequently misdiagnosed in younger dogs due to their uniquely large heart. A retired track dog with heart failure outside of old age (usually VERY old age) is quite rare.

 

This may sound callous, when cancer or heart failure or renal failure strikes in old age, it's just that- old age. It doesn't make it any easier on the dog or the owner, but *something* will eventually give out or become cancerous.

 

Greyhounds also tend to have the traits of being stoic and NOT lingering. In other words, for a lot of hounds, they won't show symptoms until they're VERY sick, and once they are sick, they are either too far gone or don't respond to treatment. The hound that stays around for a year after a serious diagnosis is the exception to the rule.... they do not lend themselves to early diagnosis and treatment.

 

Lynn

Edited by LynnM
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I've lost 3 greyhounds to osteo between the ages of 9 to 10. :cry1 I've also had a senior girlie who lived to be 14.5 and a present one (the divine Miss Phoenix) who turned 15.5 today. :kiss2 Every day is a gift... :)

Jeanne with Remington & Scooter the cat
....and Beloved Bridge Angels Sandee, Shari, Wells, Derby, Phoenix, Jerry Lee and Finnian.....
If tears could build a stairway, and memories a lane, I'd walk right up to heaven
and bring you home again.

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Guest JohnnyBell

My 6yo Sophie had osteo and is over 5 months post-op and still going strong.She plays like a puppy and it's amazing to see her run and keep up with the others :inlove .I hope I never have to do this again.What a hard thing to deal with.Big :bighug to eveyone who has delt with or is dealing with a hound with cancer.I HATE CANCER!!!!!!!

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I lost my 9-year-old golden retriever to cancer (stomach was full of tumours) and my not-even-5-year old greyhound to what was likely a nerve sheath tumour.

 

It hits any breed at any age.

Remembering the games we used to play: Games We Used to Play: A Hop, Skip and Jump Down Memory Lane

 

Oscar (Answer to Chevy): 8/23/02-8/13/07 & Dee (Cee Bar Denise): 12/23/98-8/28/08.

Order your own copy of Oscar's Diaries: Life as a Retired Greyhound

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