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Ig Is A Big Time Crate Hater


Guest 2greytdogs
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Guest 2greytdogs

Hi,

We just adopted our first IG. He has only been here 5 days so hopefully this will improve but the scratching, whining, barking in the crate is going to send me over the edge. We also have two Greyhounds. I have fostered Greys and have had a few that fussed in the crate but would settle down. He is by far the worst. At night he is pretty good. I take them all up to my bedroom and put him in (I always give him a treat and make it a pleasant experience, he has blankets, stuffies) he will fuss for a few minutes and then he is fine all night. When I go out he does it even thought the other dogs are here and my kids sometimes. I was gone last night for almost 2 hours and he whined/barked the entire time. I am cleaning the house right now so he is in the crate. I am hoping that my neighbors do not start complaining since my other two dogs are very quiet. I can't even leave the windows open in that part of the house when I am gone he is so noisy. Does anyone else have an IG or Grey who did this when they were new, did it improve? I am thinking of contacting the foster Mom to see if this is something that he always did with her or maybe in a few weeks he will get better?

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Guest rachelee

Bistro would whine, cry and bark in his crate. He wouldn't even go in for his favorite treats. We decided to get rid of it.

 

Could you use baby gates instead?

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Guest GryffinSong

I crated my first iggy (Merlin) the first night. After that I gave it up. He was miserable, I was miserable, and I had to ask myself why I needed to crate him. Ever since then he's slept in bed with me, and he's happy as a clam. On the few occasions when he's had to be crated for an injury (he's broken bones a couple of times) I've put one of my others in with him and he's been fine. Iggies are generally a very needy breed and don't like being alone.

 

I have a tall gate across the door between the dining room and kitchen, so my five iggies have free run of my bedroom, the kitchen, and my studio. I have potty pads in a couple of places for them, and that's it.

 

Personally, I'd give it up. :rolleyes:

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Guest greyt2love

My Alex doesn't mind his crate. He goes right in when I say"Crate, Alex." Sometimes when he see's I'm getting ready to go out, he just goes in on his own before I say anything. I only crate him when I am away because my Yorkies will gang up on him. The female is larger than average and I've seen her have Alex down twice. I'm not taking a chance he will be hurt, so in the crate he goes. The greys are fine with him, but that Yorkie girl, she's a wild one !!

Alex is with me all the time when I am home, and at night, he crawls under the blankets and sleeps right next to me.

 

Sorry, I can't help since Alex is so good with the crate, but I think I would do away with it since he is so unhappy. As long as he is safe, why deal with the barking? If you need him blocked off from certain areas of yoour house, I would try babygates.

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Guest Spencers_Greyt

In order to get my hounds to love their crates, I always feed them in their crates and give them treats only when they're in their crates. I don't have to shut the doors any more and honestly I would rather put up the crates now but they both love them too much! :lol Maybe you ought to think of a small x-pen instead of a crate?

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Guest Jubilee251

Same - Molly whined LOUDLY and chewed at the bars. Our neighbor said it sounded like someone was beating a dog next door. :blink: We were also afraid she would hurt herself trying to get out, so we just got rid of it and baby-gated her.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest aeroangie

Otis flunked the crate as well. We tried it for about a week. He is potty trained already so I couldn't figures out the reason I was supposed to have him in it at all? I also have a pet door which he figured out on day 1 and I live in a fully fenced yard. In fact, when I built this house 12 years ago, I designed it for my first Greyhound, Torch. When this is the case, why do people feel the need for the crates? I almost didn't buy one when I got Otis a month ago, but caved in and it was a big waste of money.

 

Baby gates are much better IMHO!

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Guest grtgreys

Lily (IG) has no problem getting into her crate - she just doesn't want to be locked in her crate. She has not slept in it for years - she sleeps with us. Most IG's are snuggle bugs :lol , preferring to sleep with thier humans (be careful rolling over!) or if you have a lot of them, in a big pile of IG's.

 

Joanne, Lily the IG and Shelley the Greyt

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

Otis flunked the crate as well. We tried it for about a week. He is potty trained already so I couldn't figures out the reason I was supposed to have him in it at all? I also have a pet door which he figured out on day 1 and I live in a fully fenced yard. In fact, when I built this house 12 years ago, I designed it for my first Greyhound, Torch. When this is the case, why do people feel the need for the crates? I almost didn't buy one when I got Otis a month ago, but caved in and it was a big waste of money.

 

Baby gates are much better IMHO!

 

 

Crates are a very good idea. What happens if you have multiple hounds and one has a seizure? What happens if you have a fight and need to tend to one hound and dont want the others sniffing around and getting in the way? What happens when you have someone comming in and out of the house and you may not be around to keep the hounds safely in the house (such as cable installation, or a plumber or something like that)? What happens when you have a party and may have people that are not familiar with keeping an eye out for the hound so he/she doesnt run outside? What about if you are traveling with your hound and need to leave them in a hotel room and dont want to worry about the cleaning crew possibly comming in and letting out your hound? What if you have a foster hound? I could go on and on. There are many many reasons to have a crate and have a hound that is trained to go into the crate without hesitation and stress.

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Guest kelli123

I would rather not put my dog through continuous stress on a daily basis, just to make that one time I have to crate him easier.

 

Jenn

I feel the same as you Jenn. I have never crated any of my dogs . This just my opinion and i have never had a problem

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I like a crate trained dog just like someone else mentioned, for emergencies. What if you have to stay in a hotel because of an emergency or something. That said, I wouldn't torture my dog over it. Start in small doses. toss in a cookie, close the door for the duration of the cookie then release the dog BEFORE he starts fussing. Work your way up to longer and longer and try NEVER to let him out when he's stressing and fussing because you're inadvertently teaching him that fussing gets him released.

Angie, Pewter, and Storm-puppy

Forever missing Misty-Mousie (9/9/99 - 10/5/15)
Fort Wayne, Indiana

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I don't have ANY experience with Italian Greyhounds, so I probably don't know what I'm talking about. :lol But - my question is - how much are you crating? At night, and during the day when you're at work, and when you're home and cleaning? It seems like A LOT of crating to me. I'm not Anti-crate, I'm just wondering if you can do some other things part of the time instead - like babygate in the kitchen during the day, or close your door and not crate at night?

 

I guess I'd like to know the reasons for crating first.

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Guest Greyt_dog_lover

If you dont see any reason for the crate, what about getting rid of the muzzle, or heck, dont bother putting a leash and collar on them. You know, they get stressed out when they are on a walk and cannot chase that rabbit. There are certain things in life that are safety devices, and most of the time safety devices are not comfortable or enjoyable, but needed. When you have more than 1 or 2 hounds, you will understand.

Edited by Greyt_dog_lover
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