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Other Dogs On Walks And Dominance Play


Guest Nytingale
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Guest Nytingale

I have had Ripley now for about 6 months and I absolutely adore her. She's a 2 year old white and brindle female with a bald little butt and tummy and oh so adorable.

Anyway when we first got her we lived in a very sketch neighborhood so couldn't walk her without the fear of possibly getting shot, so she got a lot of yard time but no walks unless we drove elsewhere. We recently moved to a nice neighborhood and she gets 3, 30 min walks a day now, which she absolutely loves! This is great except she is now so obsessed with other dogs. The minute she sees another dog being walked she starts to pull at the leash and whine. She even growled/whined at one who passed on the same side of the street. If I stop to talk to another dog owner she'll get really excited and she'll start to do dominance play with the other dog, She'll stand as tall as possible, somewhat stiffly as they both sniff one another and if they move she'll start to jump into a partial play bow as if to cut them off or give chase.

Suffice to say this is a little awkward and it's never happened before when she met new dogs. So can I train her to ignore other dogs on walks? or be polite when she meets other dogs instead of getting so overstimulated?

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Rainy used to do this when we first got her. At her first Meet and Greet she lunged and tried to bite a previous foster sister! She also wanted to eat rude little dogs that we met. I was really worried about it, but in a few more months she was feeling secure and was much more polite when greeting other pups. I now can trust her to meet even the rude dogs, although she will growl and try to teach them manners. LOL She is much more tolerant to the other dogs that want to play rough and she will playbow and try to zip around in tight little circles on her leash. :) It's awful cute! When she does this I just remind her that we are not at the dog park and to gt over here goofy girl! I don't stress out about it too much. She still postures a bit at first when we meet a high energy dog, but she feels secure enough not to growl. Just try to make sure they meet butt to face so she sniffs first. ;) And don't let rude little dogs jump up at his face!

 

It might just take time for him to learn that other pups aren't a threat on leash. But just make sure you don't make him deal with rude pups until he is 100% better! Rainy has gotten so reliable that we have been using her to help a dog reactive little jack russel that lives in the same complex as we do. Rainy gives no reaction which puzzles the little dog...

------

 

Jessica

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If she's playbowing, it sounds like she wants to play -- my understanding is that's a pretty unambiguous, hard-wired sign among dogs (I don't know what "dominance play" means). And chasing is the main way greyhounds play. Are you sure the whining isn't excitement/frustration at wanting contact with other dogs? Does she get any time to, you know, be a dog with other dogs?? In my view that's crucial to any dog's mental well-being. So I would find it hard to tell from your post whether your dog actually has an issue with other dogs or is just beside herself wanting a chance to play. I mean, I know the behavior you're describing is a problem, but expecting to extinguish that behavior without letting her play with appropriate dogs in appropriate contexts (like a greyhound playdate) doesn't seem quite fair.

 

I'd say she needs a lot of exposure and conditioning -- positive reinforcement when she behaves quietly walking with other dogs in view. A positive-reinforcement based obedience training class would be great because it would give you guidance with techniques on this and lots of opportunity to practice in a controlled setting with feedback.

With Cocoa (DC Chocolatedrop), missing B for Beth (2006-2015)
And kitties C.J., Klara, Bernadette, John-Boy, & Sinbad

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Guest Bang_o_rama

(I don't know what "dominance play" means).

 

I think it involves a lot of leather accessories...

(exit, stage right!)~D~

Edited by Bang_o_rama
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Guest FlirtyMyrtle

Myrtle gets frustrated and pulls and barks when she's on lead and can't play or greet another dog. This is usually solved by going to see the other dog (if it's friendly!) once she's calmed down a bit.

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I've had my grey for about 6 months, and after about the 3 month mark, she began having what I call "leash aggression." It started out with just trying to chase and go after squirrels and cats, but after this 3 month mark (incidentally, right around this time, she caught a squirrel, so I tend to think that has something to do with it), it moved on to other dogs - but ONLY other dogs on leash. She gets very barky/growly at other dogs on leash, and it's pretty much EVERY other dog on a leash. She's fine with other dogs in social situations and with other dogs that are in their yards (she'll whine at them - or maybe it's at me for not letting her go play with them - but this I think is more "normal"). From what I have read about leash aggression, it is something you definitely don't want to encourage and should find a way to deal with. Your grey's behavior sounds similar to my grey's, so here's what I do...

 

I make sure I have treats in my pocket for walks. Amy is not great with "sit" or "down" but does pretty well with a "stand-stay" and is really good at "look." I would encourage you to get a "stay" of some sort down and the "look" command is sooooooo helpful with diminishing the leash aggression. Teach your grey the look command in the house or yard first, where there aren't distractions. Then once that is learned, do it while on walks when you don't encounter another dog/animal. Start by giving a treat each time, then back it off to only sometimes. Always give praise though!!

 

I try to be very aware of any other animals in the vacinity at all times. If I see a squirrel or cat, I try first to just get her to pay attention to me as we walk past - half the time she never knows they're there. I do this just by talking to her. The important thing in my mind is not to let the level of energy escallate from mild interest to oh-my-god-let-me-at-'em!!! So if I see another dog walking toward us and I know she sees it too, it usually starts with whining and I can tell from the position of her ears as well. So I continuously command "look". This command makes her make eye contact with me, and she knows she's likely to get a treat if she does it. So I try to stay on the opposite side of the road from the other dog on leash, but I don't turn and walk the other way. I figure she needs to learn what I expect of her - that she will not escallate to a high energy level and that dogs on leashes are not a big deal. We've been working on this for about 3 months now, and it definitely has helped, but I do think it will probably take quite a while longer before I am comfortable walking her without the treats in my pocket.

 

Hope this helps!

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I've had my grey for about 6 months, and after about the 3 month mark, she began having what I call "leash aggression." It started out with just trying to chase and go after squirrels and cats, but after this 3 month mark (incidentally, right around this time, she caught a squirrel, so I tend to think that has something to do with it), it moved on to other dogs - but ONLY other dogs on leash. She gets very barky/growly at other dogs on leash, and it's pretty much EVERY other dog on a leash. She's fine with other dogs in social situations and with other dogs that are in their yards (she'll whine at them - or maybe it's at me for not letting her go play with them - but this I think is more "normal"). From what I have read about leash aggression, it is something you definitely don't want to encourage and should find a way to deal with. Your grey's behavior sounds similar to my grey's, so here's what I do...

 

I make sure I have treats in my pocket for walks. Amy is not great with "sit" or "down" but does pretty well with a "stand-stay" and is really good at "look." I would encourage you to get a "stay" of some sort down and the "look" command is sooooooo helpful with diminishing the leash aggression. Teach your grey the look command in the house or yard first, where there aren't distractions. Then once that is learned, do it while on walks when you don't encounter another dog/animal. Start by giving a treat each time, then back it off to only sometimes. Always give praise though!!

 

I try to be very aware of any other animals in the vacinity at all times. If I see a squirrel or cat, I try first to just get her to pay attention to me as we walk past - half the time she never knows they're there. I do this just by talking to her. The important thing in my mind is not to let the level of energy escallate from mild interest to oh-my-god-let-me-at-'em!!! So if I see another dog walking toward us and I know she sees it too, it usually starts with whining and I can tell from the position of her ears as well. So I continuously command "look". This command makes her make eye contact with me, and she knows she's likely to get a treat if she does it. So I try to stay on the opposite side of the road from the other dog on leash, but I don't turn and walk the other way. I figure she needs to learn what I expect of her - that she will not escallate to a high energy level and that dogs on leashes are not a big deal. We've been working on this for about 3 months now, and it definitely has helped, but I do think it will probably take quite a while longer before I am comfortable walking her without the treats in my pocket.

 

Hope this helps!

 

There is a lot of good advice in here. I have an older grey who is leash aggressive and I believe I did all the wrong things with him when he first started exhibiting signs at the 6 month mark after being rushed by an off-leash dog. I can now control him but would never let him meet another non-grey. It's just not worth the risk.

 

I have recently adopted a new guy, about 4 months ago, who bit an off-leash collie the first week he was in his new home so he was returned. At first he would literally scream and lunge at any dog non-grey. We are currently in an all greyhound obedience class where he has already tried to bite the instructors poodle. He's a fantastic dog outside of this issue.

 

We have been working on a lot of commands. The first one was to just get him to look at me when I called his name. I carry a ton of treats on walks and call his name randomly and he is rewarded with a treat when he makes eye contact. Once he had his name down, we have moved to commands like "with me" where he needs to walk right next to my side, "wait" which means he stops and waits until I give him another command and "watch" which means to look in my eyes (which is similar to "look" mentioned above).

 

I think the biggest mistake I made initially was to try to get him close to other dog to just get him used to it. Instead, you should stay as far away as possible and let your dog watch the other dog but keep moving. Praise your dog for good behavior but be sure to keep your voice calm as if it's no big deal. Over time you can get closer as your dog becomes less reactive. It's best initially to practice meeting another dog with a fence between so no one gets hurt. Also, when you get to the point of letting other dogs meet your dog, make sure the other dog comes to you and don't let your dog lunge at the other.

 

I've only had my new guy 4 months now but we've seen remarked improvement. I'm hopeful that he can eventually socialize with other dogs but I'm in no rush to have it happen. Best of luck. It can be a lot of work but also can be very rewarding.

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I've had my grey for about 6 months, and after about the 3 month mark, she began having what I call "leash aggression." It started out with just trying to chase and go after squirrels and cats, but after this 3 month mark (incidentally, right around this time, she caught a squirrel, so I tend to think that has something to do with it), it moved on to other dogs - but ONLY other dogs on leash. She gets very barky/growly at other dogs on leash, and it's pretty much EVERY other dog on a leash. She's fine with other dogs in social situations and with other dogs that are in their yards (she'll whine at them - or maybe it's at me for not letting her go play with them - but this I think is more "normal"). From what I have read about leash aggression, it is something you definitely don't want to encourage and should find a way to deal with. Your grey's behavior sounds similar to my grey's, so here's what I do...

 

I make sure I have treats in my pocket for walks. Amy is not great with "sit" or "down" but does pretty well with a "stand-stay" and is really good at "look." I would encourage you to get a "stay" of some sort down and the "look" command is sooooooo helpful with diminishing the leash aggression. Teach your grey the look command in the house or yard first, where there aren't distractions. Then once that is learned, do it while on walks when you don't encounter another dog/animal. Start by giving a treat each time, then back it off to only sometimes. Always give praise though!!

 

I try to be very aware of any other animals in the vacinity at all times. If I see a squirrel or cat, I try first to just get her to pay attention to me as we walk past - half the time she never knows they're there. I do this just by talking to her. The important thing in my mind is not to let the level of energy escallate from mild interest to oh-my-god-let-me-at-'em!!! So if I see another dog walking toward us and I know she sees it too, it usually starts with whining and I can tell from the position of her ears as well. So I continuously command "look". This command makes her make eye contact with me, and she knows she's likely to get a treat if she does it. So I try to stay on the opposite side of the road from the other dog on leash, but I don't turn and walk the other way. I figure she needs to learn what I expect of her - that she will not escallate to a high energy level and that dogs on leashes are not a big deal. We've been working on this for about 3 months now, and it definitely has helped, but I do think it will probably take quite a while longer before I am comfortable walking her without the treats in my pocket.

 

Hope this helps!

 

There is a lot of good advice in here. I have an older grey who is leash aggressive and I believe I did all the wrong things with him when he first started exhibiting signs at the 6 month mark after being rushed by an off-leash dog. I can now control him but would never let him meet another non-grey. It's just not worth the risk.

 

I have recently adopted a new guy, about 4 months ago, who bit an off-leash collie the first week he was in his new home so he was returned. At first he would literally scream and lunge at any dog non-grey. We are currently in an all greyhound obedience class where he has already tried to bite the instructors poodle. He's a fantastic dog outside of this issue.

 

We have been working on a lot of commands. The first one was to just get him to look at me when I called his name. I carry a ton of treats on walks and call his name randomly and he is rewarded with a treat when he makes eye contact. Once he had his name down, we have moved to commands like "with me" where he needs to walk right next to my side, "wait" which means he stops and waits until I give him another command and "watch" which means to look in my eyes (which is similar to "look" mentioned above).

 

I think the biggest mistake I made initially was to try to get him close to other dog to just get him used to it. Instead, you should stay as far away as possible and let your dog watch the other dog but keep moving. Praise your dog for good behavior but be sure to keep your voice calm as if it's no big deal. Over time you can get closer as your dog becomes less reactive. It's best initially to practice meeting another dog with a fence between so no one gets hurt. Also, when you get to the point of letting other dogs meet your dog, make sure the other dog comes to you and don't let your dog lunge at the other.

 

I've only had my new guy 4 months now but we've seen remarked improvement. I'm hopeful that he can eventually socialize with other dogs but I'm in no rush to have it happen. Best of luck. It can be a lot of work but also can be very rewarding.

 

Fasave,

I hope this helps the original poster - I know for me, it is nice to see that someone else is having a similar problem and is dealing with it in a similar way. Thanks for sharing your insights!!

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Forgot to ask where you are located. If in or near Boston, I know of an all greyhound obedience class starting in March. I would be happy to share the information if you are interested.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest happygrey

Forgot to ask where you are located. If in or near Boston, I know of an all greyhound obedience class starting in March. I would be happy to share the information if you are interested.

 

I would love the information! Is this the class in Westborough? I'm up on the N. Shore and was hoping to find something closer.

 

We are starting to have barking issues when out on walks, though it seems sort of random about who he barks at and my husband SWEARS he doesn't do it when he's got him out on a walk. Just me. We're starting to wonder if he's protecting me or if something else is going on. Either way, I want to take him to an obedience class to get some training!

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Guest gecko_foot

I have had Ripley now for about 6 months and I absolutely adore her. She's a 2 year old white and brindle female with a bald little butt and tummy and oh so adorable.

Anyway when we first got her we lived in a very sketch neighborhood so couldn't walk her without the fear of possibly getting shot, so she got a lot of yard time but no walks unless we drove elsewhere. We recently moved to a nice neighborhood and she gets 3, 30 min walks a day now, which she absolutely loves! This is great except she is now so obsessed with other dogs. The minute she sees another dog being walked she starts to pull at the leash and whine. She even growled/whined at one who passed on the same side of the street. If I stop to talk to another dog owner she'll get really excited and she'll start to do dominance play with the other dog, She'll stand as tall as possible, somewhat stiffly as they both sniff one another and if they move she'll start to jump into a partial play bow as if to cut them off or give chase.

Suffice to say this is a little awkward and it's never happened before when she met new dogs. So can I train her to ignore other dogs on walks? or be polite when she meets other dogs instead of getting so overstimulated?

 

Tumnus is very animal/people friendly in almost any situation, but he does fixate on occasion. When he would pull, I said "this way" and did an immediate turn in another direction. Once he was following me (on a loose leash) with his ears and face relaxed, I would give the command again and continue in the original direction. If he remained relaxed, he got a little praise party, and we continued on our walk. Otherwise, we circled the same area for several minutes until I got his attention. I don't know if this will work for every dog. Tumnus is not very food or toy oriented, so I don't use those for outdoor training.

 

Good luck!

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  • 2 months later...
Guest Nytingale

Thanks for those who replied, I'm going to have to try the "look" command thing. I've been trying the one where we turn about until she relaxes again but the minute we turn back around she tenses up and starts looking around for the other dog again.

 

As for "dominance play" I meant stiff legs and trying to keep her head higher than the other dog. She'll keep her tail mostly straight with a little bit of wagging. She hasn't snapped or anything but it's fairly obvious she's trying to assert herself as dominant dog. I just know she'll do this with the wrong dog one day.

 

As for socializing her, we take her to a double gated enclosed dog park every weekend so she can run and play with other dogs and she does gloriously. Never had a single problem except, perhaps, for running over the little dogs, but thats not her fault, they're so short! So it sounds like leash aggression as stated by some of the others.

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Guest saltwaterron

i have a similar problem with riley. if we are walking and meet someone who has their dog on a leash, riley is very calm and interested in meeting . but if we encounter a dog not on a leash, she acts like she wants to go after them. would this be considered leash aggression and if so how do i deal with it. glad this topic was started.

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Guest tinams8

i have a similar problem with riley. if we are walking and meet someone who has their dog on a leash, riley is very calm and interested in meeting . but if we encounter a dog not on a leash, she acts like she wants to go after them. would this be considered leash aggression and if so how do i deal with it. glad this topic was started.

I think this is fairly normal behavior. When one dog is on a leash and the other is not, they can feel very threatened. The unleashed dog has more control, and the leashed dog sees himself as trapped. Especially if the unleashed dog comes running and barking towards you. Honestly, it scares the heck out of me, too!

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