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I was stupid and my greyhound did a snarling jump and scratched me


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Hey everyone. 

Don't think I'm really looking for advice as I know what I did wrong - would love to hear that I'm not the only stupid new greyhound owner in the world! I know all about positive reinforcement and have been working really hard on doing that with Jack. Today Jack was trying to lick up the open dishwasher door. I gave a firm no and moved his head gently away. He kept going back so I kept saying no. Looking back I obviously should have got a treat and lured him away with it, but I just wasn't thinking and kept saying no. He gave me a little growl and then when I said no again he turned around and jumped up on me, he barked in my face and did a big growl. I don't think he tried to bite me (a small positive). but his claws jumping up have given me a big scratch on my tummy. He snarled a lot and then we just looked at each other for a second and then he got down and was back to his gentle lovely self. 

I feel so stupid. He gave me a warning growl and I didn't take it seriously enough. Lesson obviously learned to remember positive reinforcement training and not get into his space. Has anyone had anything similar with their newly adopted grey? I love him so much but I am so aware that not only did I get a greyhound, but I got a massive one! (37 kilos and oh so tall!). Will he hold it against me? Will he trust me less now or is it an in-the-moment thing for them? Is there anything I should do? 

 

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1 hour ago, HazeyJ said:

y Jack was trying to lick up the open dishwasher door.

OMG why do they do this?  Patches & the new GS puppy do this all the time.  Jack has already moved on.  Next time you will know.  A stern no and if that does not work redirect some place else with a small treat. 

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Jack needs to learn 'leave it'!

Start with a small yummy treat in your hand.   When he turns to look at it, say 'leave it' and close your fist.  Leave your fist closed until he turns his head away.  This may take only a few seconds...could take minutes.  Then, as soon as he turns his head away, praise him... 'GOOD BOY'  and say 'take it'. 

Repeat, repeat, repeat.

Don't make this a marathon.   Do it a just few times a day.   Start to change it up...ask him to 'leave it' with a stuffie. 

My guys will 'leave it' for their dinner bowls.  

This also will come in handy when one day you're walking along the road and he looks to grab an old moldy sandwich from the ditch.

NSK-Winter.jpg.a6ea578c2e544932c5222b81cda3216d.jpg

Nancy...Mom to Sid (Peteles Tiger) and Kibo (112 Carlota Galgos).   Missing Casey, Gomer, Mona, Penelope, BillieJean, Bandit, Nixon (Starz Sammie),  Ruby (Watch Me Dash) and especially  Nigel (Nigel), waiting at the Bridge.

 

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6 hours ago, BatterseaBrindl said:

Jack needs to learn 'leave it'!

Start with a small yummy treat in your hand.   When he turns to look at it, say 'leave it' and close your fist.  Leave your fist closed until he turns his head away.  This may take only a few seconds...could take minutes.  Then, as soon as he turns his head away, praise him... 'GOOD BOY'  and say 'take it'. 

Repeat, repeat, repeat.

Don't make this a marathon.   Do it a just few times a day.   Start to change it up...ask him to 'leave it' with a stuffie. 

My guys will 'leave it' for their dinner bowls.  

This also will come in handy when one day you're walking along the road and he looks to grab an old mouldy sandwich from the ditch.

You could also spray the door with bitter apple

Grace (Ardera Coleen) born 18 June 2014
Raced at Monmore Green, Wolverhampton UK - 68 Races, 9 wins, 5 second places
Gotcha Day 10 June 2018 

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I don’t think he will hold it against you. He might remember that this is a ‘treat’ that will be taken from him which might make him lick the dishwasher door/contents more quickly because he knows he’s going to be stopped, but that’s where the leave it training comes in.

I’ve certainly done stupid things with mine as a newbie greyhound owner. It’s a learning curve for you both, and the more experience you have, the more the stupid leaves you!

Living with Buddy Molly b. 5 November 2010. Welcomed home 16/6/2018 ❤️

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You didn't do anything wrong in my opinion.  YOU are the boss and are the one who rules that household and should be the one in control-not him. You don't have to ask him or bribe him into doing whatever you want.  He actually wants and needs a leader. Letting them control things is actually harmful on many different levels.  It can affect their confidence, make them a shell of what they could be etc., and in your case it sounds dangerous to me. You'd better be very careful he doesn't bite you at such times because he is clearly dominating you.  I think you should find an experienced knowledgeable dog person to help you and Jack get on the right path. It will make all the difference.  It won't be easy because with his large size he probably feels like he can control you pretty easily.  However, it probably won't be a very pleasurable relationship for you if you continue to let him rule the roost and it certainly is dangerous. If you get help and take proper control ASAP it can make ALL the difference and you may turn this situation around to a blessed one. But as long as he is the leader and you are catering and cajoling to him-even when he disobeys you!- as it is now, then its probably not going to work out very good.  And again please be careful you don't get bit! And the truth is taking your rightful control over him is the kindest and best thing you can do for him.  The present situation is not good for him either. You need to do some obedience with him for sure. Please get a knowledgeable trainer (not a PetSmart big box deal). I can tell you this because I myself just went through it with a dog.  I needed help and I found a great super qualified trainer and wow! what a difference it made.  Unbelievable how much better things are now.  So let me just encourage you to seek help because frankly IMO you have a problem right now that needs to be fixed and the longer you wait the worse it is going to get.  And don't worry about it. It is totally normal to have issues that need to be dealt with and fixed when dealing with dogs.  The truth is he will trust you more if you take control and be the leader than he does right now. Take care. All the best to you and Jack :) Keep us advised.

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Hi Racindog, 

Thanks for your comment, although I admit it made me very nervous! I've thought about it but I think Jack really acts out of fear more than dominance. He's a nervous boy and this is his reaction to being overwhelmed. He responds to training quite well even though it's only been a week and in general I think he respects me. In this specific instance, I think I was in his space and I was trying to be firm but it probably came out quite frustrated. I think I just agitated him and then when I leaned over him he couldn't handle it. I will keep an eye on it. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 10/8/2020 at 8:45 PM, HazeyJ said:

Hi Racindog, 

Thanks for your comment, although I admit it made me very nervous! I've thought about it but I think Jack really acts out of fear more than dominance. He's a nervous boy and this is his reaction to being overwhelmed. He responds to training quite well even though it's only been a week and in general I think he respects me. In this specific instance, I think I was in his space and I was trying to be firm but it probably came out quite frustrated. I think I just agitated him and then when I leaned over him he couldn't handle it. I will keep an eye on it. 

A week - ahh, you're in the early days. It's tough but don't let any of it get to you (easier said than done), especially if he gets snappy or cranky. 

I found with my nervous grey that touching him, trying to move him or pushing him from something was a HUGE no-no. He wasn't used to being handled and would panic, react and sometimes snap. It took weeks, possibly months, before I could touch him easily in any situation and truly trust him/and him me.

'Leave it' training mentioned above is definitely the way to go. That way you can tell him something he is doing is wrong without having to invade his space if necessary. 

I also have a very firm "no" used sparingly (he hates stern voices) kept for extreme situations (eg grabbing something he shouldn't have...etc) which comes out if he doesn't listen. On the rare occasion that leave it doesn't work - he knows that "NO!" means business and will jump in surprise and wander off nonchalantly with a "what?? I wasn't doing anything" face :-) 

 

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