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I feel like my grey is a little underweight. She has a high metabolism it does seem. She is not picky at all and will eat anything in sight, is there maybe a few things I can toss her way that might help with this? Or maybe just add some extra of her regular dog food. Thanks

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Are you sure she is underweight? Greyhounds do seem to be very thin especially compared to other dogs.

Greyhound Friends For Life say "The rule of thumb is that you should be able to see the outline of the last 3 ribs, the tips of the hip bones, and a bit of the spine.  Usually the ideal pet weight is about 3‑5 pounds heavier than the racing weight.  When the greyhound is viewed sideways, there should be a nice curve (“tuck up”) between the end of the ribs and the thighs.  Allowing your greyhound to become heavier puts undue strain on the heart and on tendons, ligaments, and joints, which can lead to more problems with arthritis."

If you do need to increase her weight I suggest increasing the food at meal times. If you give her bits and pieces at other times she will expect it and it then becomes difficult if you need to reduce her weight in the future. Also check the protein level of her food, it should be around 20% now she's retired.

Grace (Ardera Coleen) born 18 June 2014
Raced at Monmore Green, Wolverhampton UK - 68 Races, 9 wins, 5 second places
Gotcha Day 10 June 2018 

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10 minutes ago, HeyRunDog said:

Are you sure she is underweight? Greyhounds do seem to be very thin especially compared to other dogs.

Greyhound Friends For Life say "The rule of thumb is that you should be able to see the outline of the last 3 ribs, the tips of the hip bones, and a bit of the spine.  Usually the ideal pet weight is about 3‑5 pounds heavier than the racing weight.  When the greyhound is viewed sideways, there should be a nice curve (“tuck up”) between the end of the ribs and the thighs.  Allowing your greyhound to become heavier puts undue strain on the heart and on tendons, ligaments, and joints, which can lead to more problems with arthritis."

If you do need to increase her weight I suggest increasing the food at meal times. If you give her bits and pieces at other times she will expect it and it then becomes difficult if you need to reduce her weight in the future. Also check the protein level of her food, it should be around 20% now she's retired.

I second this. If you think she is underweight she is probably perfect. Mine is overweight and someone on here posted this for me which I found really useful

http://www.greyhoundcrossroads.com/index.php?page=weight
 

Living with Buddy Molly b. 5 November 2010. Welcomed home 16/6/2018 ❤️

Won 17/112 races at Romford - our champion Essex boy

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  • 2 weeks later...

Yes to seeing a couple of ribs.  Remember that you have a greyhound, not a Labbie.  ;) :)

Hookworms is a distinct possibility.  The thread I linked you to is long, but very relevant.  Enjoy your new pupper.  :)

Wendy and The Whole Wherd. American by birth, Southern by choice.
"Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup!"
****OxyFresh Vendor ID is 180672239.****

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