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Greyhounds And Toddlers


Emmers_mk
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Hello everyone! My husband and I are in the process of adopting a grey. We are approved and currently waiting for the perfect pup to add to our family. I have a major concern though. We have a grandson who is 2 years old. He is respectful, but toddlers are toddlers and dogs are dogs. We were about to go meet a potential adoptee when the foster parents told us about the dog being aggressive towards her children. This happened three times with three potential greyhounds! Im starting to lose hope that we will ever find a greyhound that is kid friendly... our grandson is around probably 4-5 times a week. I realize it will take awhile for the dog to get acclimated to being around crazy toddlers and Im prepared to put in the effort and time to make it work. However, is this breed simply not compatible with toddlers? I want a greyhound so bad, they have the perfect personality but now Im starting to get cold feet.. anyone out there have a good experience with introducing greyhounds and toddlers? Thanks yall.

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Toddlers and greyhounds can be a tough match. Mostly because both have the toddler mentality. The grey is in a new environment and trying to figure out what's expected of him or her, and the toddler is pushing every limit they can as they learn to explore.

 

Racing greyhounds have never been touched while sleeping, never had anyone reach into their food bowl while eating, pounce on them or startle them trying to play and lots of other things that kids do. It's not so much that the dog is aggressive, but that there are rules that have to be followed by the entire household and not just the child to respect the dog's space. Many toddlers just aren't at a point where they are capable of following those rules. On the flip side of that, many homes with toddlers do just fine with greyhounds. It is all going to depend on the toddler, and the dog as well as the boundaries that are set for both and the dog getting used to the routine of living in a house.

 

The problem if you have a toddler who doesn't follow the rules is that you are setting up the dog for failure. There have been previous cases where a child reached into a dog's bowl, or tried to take food away and the dog ends up being labeled as vicious when it defends it's food or space in normal dog behavior. So, probably not the answer you are looking for, but it's all going to depend on both the toddler respecting the rules, and the dog learning the rules and routine of the house. I'm putting that in it's simplest form when it can be very complex.

 

Some of the others here who have been through getting a new dog with a small child or toddler can share their experience with this. Both the toddler and the dog have to be a good match from the onset. If the dog is afraid of children (some are) then that dog isn't a good fit for your house. It may take time, but there will eventually be a dog who is. The group needs to step up and make sure that any dog introduced is potentially a good match for your household based on the experience that the foster has with them.

 

Good luck. It can take a little time to find that perfect hound.

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The currently empty and way too quiet home of Camp Broodie.  Always missing my boy Rocket Hi Noon Rocket,  Allie  Phoenix Dynamite, Kate Miss Kate, Starz Under Da Starz, and Petunia MW Neptunia.

 

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Thank you so much for your reply. It brings me some peace! Our grandson is very well behaved. He’s been raised with horses, cats and other dogs. He knows to give dogs their space but like I said, toddlers are unpredictable! We are working very closely with the adoption agency and they are trying hard for us to find the right one! Are there any pointers on how to handle the first month or so with the toddler? We were wondering if a muzzle should be applied the first couple times together. I really want this to work out and am willing to try anything! My daughter is also very aware of how particular this might be regarding my grandson and a new dog so she’s on board with discipline her child and making sure he behaves correctly around the dog!

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I've never seen a toddler muzzled before.... :bgeorge

 

Muzzles have their place but some hounds really hate them. I have no problem muzzling a hound when left alone at home or left with another hound. The hounds are used to being muzzled for turnouts and playtime in the kennel. It's certainly an option when you make the introductions and while they are getting used to each other and go from there. I probably wouldn't muzzle every time your grandson comes though as the dog may start to associate him with being muzzled. They will probably become friends very quickly, and as long as your grandson stays off of the dog's bed, doesn't grab toys or food away, or touch the dog while sleeping, you've covered 99% of the triggers. Remember that many of these hounds can be sound asleep with their eyes open when lying down, so you might want to start with a "no petting unless the dog is standing up rule" just to be safe.

 

Hopefully someone with toddlers can chime in on whether they've muzzled on a regular basis with kids around. I've never seen it, but we aren't around kids very often living here in the old people's capital of the US.

 

Edited typo.

Edited by Time4ANap
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The currently empty and way too quiet home of Camp Broodie.  Always missing my boy Rocket Hi Noon Rocket,  Allie  Phoenix Dynamite, Kate Miss Kate, Starz Under Da Starz, and Petunia MW Neptunia.

 

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After 3 not-kid friendly greyhounds in one foster home, I would begin to wonder why and what the foster Mom is actually doing and allowing her kids to do! But that's another story...

 

 

Anyway, ensure your group knows about the toadler in your home. Also, this book is supposed to be also very helpful.

 

 

It is all about respect for the dog.

Wendy and The Whole Wherd. American by birth, Southern by choice.
"Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup!"
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I had greyhounds before I had children and my kids have always lived with a greyhound or two since. I never adopted a new greyhound when my kids were toddlers but the two I had were both very good with the kids. I constantly reminded the kids of the dog rules and always closely watched them around the dogs and never had a single issue. Now the kids are 5 and 8 so past that stage but we've adopted 2 hounds in the last year both of which would be fine with toddlers I'm sure.

Hobbes-Ricard Hatch09/23/99-12/21/09 Always loved, never forgotten. Wally TNJ Boy Howdy, GLS Genuinerisk Corinna

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I have had three greyhounds - all of them were fine with four grandkids from birth on. My last grey, Maggie, adored children of any age. I always made sure the kids were supervised when the dogs were around. All of mine were fostered prior to me adopting them (the dogs, not the kids). That way, I feel, you can get a good idea about food aggression, sleep aggression, interaction with children, etc.

Judging by my three, you will find the perfect dog for you.

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I think the big question is how closely you and the kid's parents will supervise kid-dog interactions. If they can't be supervised, they must be separated. One family I know converted the dining room into the kid's playroom for when the parents weren't closely supervising the kid. Doggy gates were set up to keep the dog out. The den was set up as the dog's territory, the child was not allowed in. It was there that the dog was fed and had his bed. You might be able to set up something similar.

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Three of my four Greys have aced the difficult TD certification with children.

Nigel visits a class for autistic kindergarten kids :riphair

 

Would they have passed when they first arrived here? Absolutely not.

They need time, time and more time, just living in a home and getting used to 'life'.

 

My grandkids were 2 & 4 when our first Greyhound Nixon arrived.

We also had a GSDx and a PointerX at that time so the kids were already 'trained' on proper behaviour around dogs. We also have horses.

 

Yes ... a lot depends on the dogs temperament, but the onus is on the adults to teach the children to leave the dog alone.

 

It sounds like your grandson is used to lots of critters but he'll have to be supervised at all times for the first few weeks. And he won't be a toddler forever!

I would not muzzle, but make sure you have a comfortable safe space where the new dog can retreat.

 

Nancy...Mom to Sid (Peteles Tiger), Kibo (112 Carlota Galgos) and Mario (2nd Chance Rescue).   Missing Casey, Gomer, Mona, Penelope, BillieJean, Bandit, Nixon (Starz Sammie),  Ruby (Watch Me Dash) and especially  Nigel (Nigel), waiting at the Bridge

 

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Thank you all so much for the replies! It gives me a lot of hope. I appreciate it so much! I have one last question. There is a dog we might possibly look at. The foster parents said he is a little timid and has groweld At her 2 year old son a couple times when he even just walked past? Is that typical behavior? Or are there other greys that are more tolerant than this one? Also, is that something they usually grow out of, or does this dog just sound really insecure? Thanks!

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We have two precious grandsons - age 5 (last September) and 2 (will be 3 early April). We have two (had three until last fall when we lost Ronee). The boys have a chihuahua at home - so are used to being kind and careful. Our greyhounds are amazing with the boys. Ronee was the favorite - our old brood mom with the patience of a saint. The boys still ask occasionally where Ronee is and say they miss her (as we do!). But Jill and Phog are wonderful with them too. I guess the difference is we had the dogs first — and so they have watched the boys grow and develop and the boys have always known to be gentle and respect.

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That sounds more like space guarding--a lot of dogs don't like people near their beds or crates or kennels.

 

Any dog with a mouth can bite--there are some little dogs I'd not trust around children or adults!

 

Also, look at how rambunctious the dog is--Johnny is a jumper, he just gets so excited sometimes and forgets himself. He can knock me down, and I'm not a small person.

Current Crew: Gino-Gene-Eugene! (Eastnor Rebel: Makeshift x Celtic Dream); Fuzzy the Goo-Goo Girl (BGR Fuzzy Navel: Boc's Blast Off x Superior Peace); Roman the Giant Galoot! (Imark Roman: Crossfire Clyde x Shana Wookie); Kitties Archie and Dixie

Forever Missed: K9 Sasha (2001-2015); Johnny (John Reese--Gable Dodge x O'Jays) (2011-19); the kitties Terry and Bibbi; and all the others I've had the privilege to know

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Thank you all so much for the replies! It gives me a lot of hope. I appreciate it so much! I have one last question. There is a dog we might possibly look at. The foster parents said he is a little timid and has groweld At her 2 year old son a couple times when he even just walked past? Is that typical behavior? Or are there other greys that are more tolerant than this one? Also, is that something they usually grow out of, or does this dog just sound really insecure? Thanks!

It could just me a matter of him getting used to kids and will relax in time or maybe not. I do think there are other greyhounds that would be more comfortable around kids to start with though. If I was you I'd want to get a greyhound that is happy around kids to begin with then have positive interaction with your grandchild to reinforce that attitude.

Hobbes-Ricard Hatch09/23/99-12/21/09 Always loved, never forgotten. Wally TNJ Boy Howdy, GLS Genuinerisk Corinna

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That sounds more like space gusrding--a lot of dogs don't like people near their beds or crates or kennels.

 

I think space guarding is a very difficult thing to manage with kids around even in the best of homes. Edited by greytluck

Hobbes-Ricard Hatch09/23/99-12/21/09 Always loved, never forgotten. Wally TNJ Boy Howdy, GLS Genuinerisk Corinna

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Sheba bit my 2-1/2-year-old great-niece on her face near her eyebrow. Fortunately the damage was not major. Totally my fault as I hadn't had Sheba all that long, I wasn't watching closely enough, and we were in a strange environment. I'd turned my back for a moment, and my niece approached Sheba while she was on her dog bed. I didn't see it happen but assume it was a space or startle issue or resource-guarding. Total supervision, separate spaces when not supervised, set up the rules, even a muzzle at times are necessary, especially early on.

To this day, Sheba has space issues but fortunately we have no youngsters at the house. I still caution guests to leave her alone when she's on her dog bed/ As I said earlier, it wasn't Sheba's fault, it was mine.

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Thanks again you guys! You all have great answers. I will definitely wait then for the next group of greys in 8 weeks. I dont want to risk it with a dog that already has some space issues when like yall said there are plenty that are better about it. I think I have the best information for now. Im going to read some books on toddlers and greyhounds and continue my search for the perfect match!

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If I could post photos I would show you Chancey and my grandson sleeping together on the settee.

Chancey was a leaping screaming maniac when I first took her out walking and she saw another dog but with care and watchfulness she accepted Dexter and he could fall asleep with his head on her. Although she is an ex-racer she might well have spent her racing life in her owner’s house or been used to a family (she didn’t like TV at first).

Miss "England" Carol with Chancey - (Goosetree Chance) and whippet lurcher Nutmeg

R.I.P. Bluegrass Banjoman. 25.1.2004 - 25.5.2015 and Ch. Sleepyhollow Aida. 30.9.2000 - 10.1.2014.

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Some greyhounds love children. I had a male hound once that I know had never been around children and met his first ones at a family picnic. It was love at first sight. He always adored children and was very gentle and loving with them and actually seemed to watch out for them. It all depends on the dog but some greyhounds ARE good kid dogs. YOU however must understand that this does not mean that the dog should tolerate abuse such as having its ears twisted and other kid things. The dog will depend on you to protect it and keep things in order.

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All of my greyhounds have been fine with well supervised toddlers, as long as the dogs were allowed an area to retreat to where the children were not allowed. This actually means more than it sounds. Only one of my greyhounds would have been considered appropriate to live with children. Yet all did fine with toddlers as long as they could take a break when the attention or activity became too much. When visiting family who have young kids, we had an off-limits area for the dogs. Sometimes that was a room in the house and sometimes just a soft crate or pen. If the dog or dogs were in there, the kids had to wait until the dogs came out on their own. There was one child in the family who was just too much for my dogs. (The problem was the child and his parents.) As long as he was able to restrain himself, he could be with the dogs. When his self control started to lapse, I put the dogs up "for nap time.". That arrangement worked well.

 

When adopting my greyhounds, I made it clear that while I do not have any children, we would be around kids and I needed dogs that would be fine with polite kids. And they have been. That doesn't mean my dogs would be expected to tolerate rough treatment, poking, pulling, screaming, kids constantly flailing their arms, getting up in the dogs' faces or any constant attention without a break. As long as we keep the dogs needs in mind & help the kids learn the polite, safe ways to treat dogs, things have gone smoothly.

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