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Bizeebee

Appropriate Percentage Protein?

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We're in the process of troubleshooting a mysterious, minor health issue with our grey, and since it began right around the time we switched to our current food, we're considering finding another one. At the moment we're not in a position to go raw, so dry kibble is what I'm looking at/for currently.

 

In my looking around, man do some of these foods have HIGH percentage protein! +30% just seems crazy high to me, for a dog that runs around in the yard after a ball a couple times a day but basically just sleeps and toodles around the house. Isn't there a point where there's too much protein for the kidneys to handle? Maybe I'm totally off base though...

 

What do you consider an appropriate percentage protein for your dog food?

How high is too high?

How low is too low?

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It kind of depends on your dog, and their activity level.

 

But, IMO, unless your dog is doing daily performance sports trials or training, or working on conditioning for such tasks, and is just a "normal" greyhound pet dog, somewhere around 20-25% seems to be plenty. Too much protein and it get's too rich for the breeds physical system and causes things like diarrhea and amazingly horrible gaseous emmisions. Too little and your dog isn't getting enough nutrition.

 

FWIW, many dogs here on GT have had great results with mid-priced, mid protein grade kibble, namely: the Kirkland brand of food from Costco, and the Purina Pro Plan varieties. My vet tells me that most food intolerances and allergies in dogs are to chicken and corn, so you may choose to avoid those if you suspect your dog has this problem. There are loads of alternatives.

 

Don't get caught up in the current fad for grain free, or unique proteins, unless your dog has a specific health issue that nessecitates using those kinds of foods.


Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

35764734494_93de5b5963_b.jpg

Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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sighthounds need around 24% protein, too little not enough to sustain them, too much and it's trouble- too rich, just as much strain on their systems. keep things in moderation. and what you can afford. eagle pac, purina pro plan focus, blue seal(like the farm food, a good basic reasonable kibble) all have worked for my dog and pocket book.

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In the UK the percentage of protein recommended for retired greyhounds is 19 to 20%


Grace (Ardera Coleen) born 18 June 2014
Raced at Monmore Green, Wolverhampton UK - 68 Races, 9 wins, 5 second places
Gotcha Day 10 June 2018 

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When I switched back from 27% to 19.5% I noticed an immediate difference in the stool output going back to normal consistency. She even appears to 'like' the kibble now. (James Wellbeloved, Turkey & Rice Senior).

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What is the minor health issue?

That's an excellent question, and unfortunately is still a mystery :(

Our 4 yr old guy - who is pretty well house-trained - is sporadically drinking and peeing a ton, and (understandably) doing some of that peeing in the house. Multiple UAs, a culture, bladder X-rays and ultrasounds all show nothing, so before we go down the route of testing for "zebras" we thought we'd see if changing food helped - since the problem began right after we finished transitioning to the current food he's on, and it's the only environmental change we can pin anything on at the moment.

 

But figuring out food is it's own black hole of variables, so I'll take any info I can get to help me narrow the field!

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I currently feed raw. I started doing it for an IBS dog, and have just continued for the other dogs. I have, however, over the years fed kibble to my dogs and to fosters, and they seem to do best with protein in the 18%-20% range. You don’t have to get exotic proteins or fancy (expensive) specialty food unless your dog has a specific medical issue. Just get something with good, real ingredients and minimal fillers. Good luck on pinpointing the problem!

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Pay attention to the salt content in what he's getting to eat. Another GTer had this issue and she noticed the peanut butter she was giving him as a treat (in Kongs and such) had a huge amount of salt in it. She changed to a natural brand and the issue resolved.


Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

35764734494_93de5b5963_b.jpg

Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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