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After We Moved, Greyhound Is Increasingly Destructive When Left Alone

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Guest poopchow

Hi everyone,

 

My gf and I have a 4.5 year old retired racer that we got a year ago. We just moved, but in the old place she loved her crate and would generally be there during our workday (8hrs) with little to no issues.

 

In the new place, she is getting increasingly destructive during this same schedule (bed ripped up, blankets torn, yanked, roughed up nose. She doesn't pee). We got her a calming collar, anxiety meds, melatonin and have put stuff in her crate she likes (kongs, toys, blankets that she knows). We also have been training her (with varying degrees of rigor), to enjoy her crate. She goes in, sleeps in it, we can leave the door open with her in it and she has become increasingly accustomed to the crate in the new place.

 

The new place is a duplex where we have the have the lower floor. Above us is a young family with a small kid. My gf and I are used to their sounds, but it travels to down to us. These are typical sounds of either people moving, a kid running around a little, there is some jumping contraption they have up there that can be kinda annoying, but to us, nothing crazy.

 

After all we've done, through 3 weeks our dog is getting worse being in the crate. The dog has always been nervous around kids, but we are wondering if those noises is the source of her anxiety. I can't say that's for certain, we are getting to the point where it's gone from a smaller issue to a big one.

 

Our immediate idea is to muzzle her when she's in the crate just to stop her from being destructive, and then introduce her to the family upstairs to get familiar with what could be those sounds as well as to take her to the dog park more to socialize in general.

 

It's sad seeing her go through this, as well as my girlfriend who is the one who gets home first and sees the new damage for the day. I'm doing research on my own but does anyone have suggestions for how we can get rid of this behavior?

Thanks

 

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Are you leaving a radio or tv on to mask the noises from outside and upstairs? Most of the track kennels play tv or radio around the clock for this reason.

 

Are your neighbors hearing howling or barking as well? Just wondering how agitated the hound is.


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Always missing my boy Hi Noon Rocket. The home of Petunia, MW Neptunia and Kate, Miss Kate.

 

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Set up a camera and set what is triggering the behavior. It may be that getting a dog walker could help give a mid-day break. It might also be too noisy for her to sleep and in that case, some music to cover up the noise from above might help.

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If she's afraid of children then meeting one won't help her. It's the noises that are are setting her off, IMO. My anxious girl could *never* have lived with a kid above her! ;) You need to find a way to mask the daytime sounds, either with a TV or radio, or white noise machine. You can try and leave her out of the crate, that way she won't feel trapped when the noises make her anxious. You can also try relocating the crate to a quieter place in the house for her daytime retreat. If all else fails, you may need to talk with your vet about a course of anti anxiety meds to get her through this adjustment period.

 

You also will probably need to completely start over from the beginning with her Alone Training and getting her used to being by herself in a new place. We see this quite frequently - a dog is fine being alone, then freaks out after a move. It's a new place, with new noises, a new routine, new everything - so you need to help her learn that everything is *still* fine.


Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

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Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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Try leaving a TV or radio on to mask the sounds. Also, I had a hound that LOVED his crate - stayed in it when we were gone, slept in it,etc. Never had a problem in those 2 or 3 years. We moved and when we put him in it the first time he went crazy and tried to break out. At that point we left him out when we left and all was well. Fortunately he wasn't destructive when left alone, just didn't want to be alone in the crate. He never slept in the crate again either. Very weird - the move really freaked him out. Currently we have a hound that is terrified of the sound of children (turns out it isn't just children but also women with higher pitched voices). We used to live in a neighborhood with privacy fences and when we would take walks she would completely freak out when she could hear kids playing behind those fences. We recently moved and our new vets office is all women, with high voices. She is a mess when we go there. I will probably have to find a new vet. Good luck!


<p>Kim and the hound - Rumor
Missing my angels Marlow, Silver, Holly and Lucky

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Are you leaving a radio or tv on to mask the noises from outside and upstairs? Most of the track kennels play tv or radio around the clock for this reason.

 

Are your neighbors hearing howling or barking as well? Just wondering how agitated the hound is.

This is important. I adopted Octane in mid December and the TV has been going constantly when I'm at work(on Animal Planet) until yesterday. No incidents. Yesterday, after almost 2 months of it, I switched to radio only successfully. Also, I had 2 houndies who lived in a condo type place with me for a while and I left the TV on always to help them feel 'normal' and drown out extraneous noise. Worked like a charm-no problems. This is an important management tool and has worked great.Also consider getting her some Rescue Remedy. That may help. And whatever you do do NOT try and force children or whatever on her if she is uncomfortable with them. That will only exacerbate the situation and make her worse because then she will begin to believe that you will not even protect her from the scary things. Work on getting her to understand that YOU will protect her from the scary things; that YOU are her safe place. Then she will be less and less concerned and feel less threatened by them because she knows you will protect her and won't let anything harmful hurt her. Extra added bonus is it greatly enhances your engagement with your dog which will help in many additional areas as well. But forcing them on her to "show" her they won't hurt her will just make her much worse so I wouldn't do that. It will just make her think she can't trust you-her pack leader- to protect her. JMO.

Edited by racindog

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You're talking about a dog, remember, not a hairy person. She's not going to meet the upstairs neighbors and put two and two together and think, "Oh! Those incredibly annoying and scary noises are just a kid running around." I refused to look at any condo units in my complex that were not the top floor because I find noise above my head to be extremely annoying. I'd be destructive too! But that's just me...

 

Crating makes somedogs worse, not better. If she's four years old, she should be housebroken and well past puppy chewing. If it were my dog, I'd see how she did with the crate door open, giving her the choice.

 

You don't mention how much exercise she is getting, but with an anxious dog, there is no such thing as too much exercise. A tired dog is a calm dog.



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Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

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Where is the crate positioned here in relation to where you come and go versus the old place? Sometimes its as simple as the dog needing to be able to see the door.

 

And I second the white noise machine and some soft classical music to help mute the noise from upstairs.

 

What anxiety med(s) is she on and how long has she been on them?

 

Do you have somewhere else you can leave her in the interim - a daycare, a friend, etc until you can sort this out?


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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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