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So sorry to hear of your sweet little Misty dog passing. Tears in my eyes and heart for you. I know the pain you are feeling, having travelled a similar path recently with my baby.

You did every thing you possibly could. Rejoice in the bond of love you both shared. :beatheart

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Thank you for your kind words and for the advice and support over the last month of Misty's life. It was comforting to talk to others who had been through or were going through the same thing. I miss her painfully but I feel good about her life and all the love and care she had. Her passing was peaceful and her life was amazing and beautiful. I could not ask for more.

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I know this is an older post but Im looking for some answers to help my Eddie and I noticed you wrote about Colin and his dementia Smurfette. You sound you found something that helped. Can I ask what that was?

I am sure Eddie has some dementia. He will be 13 and a half next month and hes getting us up earlier and earlier each day. He whines then it turns into a bark until you get up. Initially I always thought fine he needs to pee, hes getting older. However this morning I decided to watch his actual movements in the garden. He went out and sniffed the grass for ages but didnt do anything else so I called him back in as it was freezing and early. He came back in and stood in the kitchen staring at the wall. When I told him to go lie back down he looked most confused and then asked to go out again. I let him out again and he walked up to a plastic box and stared at it. It was very odd. I called him back in and told him to lie down and he looked confused again before eventually lying down. Then woke me again two hours later barking for the same routine. Hes done other things too like forgetting that when I open the door to the garden he needs to stand back to allow me to open it. Almost like hes forgotten that part. Whereas our 10year old will back off to allow me to open it. Perhaps I am overthinking this all but given his age I thought may be dementia. His urine test was fine and his heart is fine (as far as they can tell given the extreme panting he carries out at the vets office).

Any help is appreciated.

 

Lisa and Eddie xx


Lisa, Eddie and Milo 💕 🐶 🐾

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Yes thats also possible. What can I do to help him if his is the case? I was at work last night so not with him but I got My husband to leave a lamp on for him. Zxx


Lisa, Eddie and Milo 💕 🐶 🐾

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Yes thats also possible. What can I do to help him if his is the case? I was at work last night so not with him but I got My husband to leave a lamp on for him. Zxx

 

Depends on your veterinarian's diagnosis. Certain blinding eye conditions (like pannus) can be caught early and slowed or halted with veterinary prescribed medication.

If a condition is untreatable, human acts as seeing eye guide to help dog navigate as vision deteriorates.

Blind dogs can live a happy life and still take leashed walks while enjoying their other heightened senses (like smelling pee-mail along the way).

Ensure dog's home traffic pathways are always kept clear of items, shopping bags, boxes, etc. and are very brightly lit in house and especially the route exiting house and along outdoor pathways.

Might eventually require leashed potty outings even within a fenced yard, but they can feel different footing materials on paw pads (like grass vs. sand or pebbles).

Watch dog carefully when stepping on/off street curbs. Dog may hold head lower to ground in an attempt to see their walking path.

Blind dogs can get along fairly well inside their own home if without any changes like furniture rearranging, etc.

Imagine keeping your eyes closed while navigating without arms in complete darkness.

Take extra safety precautions by leash guiding dog on staircases, and block off staircases with a secure baby-gate (or whatever) to prevent unsupervised dog from falling down stairs.

Use ramp with side guard railings wherever possible if covering just a few steps at home, and guide along a ramp when getting in/out of car.

 

Remember to look up side effects for any/all medications dog is taking. Drug side effects are a common cause of behavior changes.

 

Senior Greyhounds really need securely carpeted floors, whether large area rugs, cheap runner rugs with rubber gripper mats underneath, or indoor/outdoor runners (found in cut-to-order rolls at home center stores). Anything other than hard surfaces like wood, tile, etc.

 

Reduced hearing sometimes happens in elder dogs too.

 

If you don't already, try giving him a light snack at bedtime in case he's getting hungry earlier. Many people give about 1/3 cup of kibble (reduced from dinner portion to prevent weight gain).

Edited by 3greytjoys

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I dont think he is blind. His eyes are cloudy but the vets told me on his last visit (which wasnt long ago) that he just has normal ageing. He dorent have pannus. He gets a very late feed. Weve actually changed the feeding time to help him get through longer but its not worked.

When he stays at a friend of mines house when we go on holiday (she boards dogs in her home) he doesnt get her up and doesnt mess the house. She does nothing different in her routine. The only difference is they she has quite a lot of dogs in one go so may be he gets more work out or likes to be around a lot of dogs. He has milo at home, his pal, he is 10. And they lay together on separate beds, next to one another. I just cant figure out why hes getting us up so early. Ive tried ignoring him but his bark gets louder and louder until hes woken the entire house up including our young boys who go to school and nursery. Ive left him a light on, on a dimmer, and thats not helped either. I just cant work it out. The only thing I can think of is that he just wants me up for attention or cuddles.

Lisa x


Lisa, Eddie and Milo 💕 🐶 🐾

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Our hounds sleep longer when the bedroom is very dark, but they don't sleep in a separate room by themselves.

Perhaps he'd benefit from a little more exercise or mind stimulation games during the day at home.

Cloudy aging of the eyes or cataracts could cause significant loss of sight over time, but it's good that you don't think he's there yet.

 

BTW, your questions might be seen by more readers if you post a new thread. :)

 

If you post two more times somewhere on GT (Cute & Funny section doesn't count), you'll be able to private message Smurfette. You just need 50 posts to private message.

Edited by 3greytjoys

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