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GreytNut

Adopting A Coyote Dog

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We weren't planning on getting another greyhound after Riley died. Sarge and Lora get along great and keep each other company.

 

However we saw a greyhound (?) our group will be collecting from a coyote hunter and felt a connection. He's the runt of his litter, only about 45 pounds at 1 year old. He's even tinier than our little black girl hound Lora, whom we always say could fit in a teacup. My guess is that he didn't make it as a coyote dog due to his size. He's a black and white cowdog who *looks* like he's 100% greyhound except that he has pale blue eyes. I have no idea what--if anything--he might be crossed with.

 

He is very shy, but we've had both a shy dog and a spook so that's not a deal breaker for us.

 

He'll need to be cat tested and assessed to see if he's a digger or fence jumper to make sure he passes the first hurdle (we have cats and a 4-foot chain link fence), and after that we would foster with intent. We'd do the cat testing and fence observation ourselves but it's 1,000 miles round trip to go pick him up, so....

 

Most coyote dogs IIRC tend to be good jumpers and avid hunters, but this little guy never made the grade so we're hopeful.

 

If anyone has adopted a former (or failed) coyote dog, what was your experience like? Any advice? Do hunters use squawkers to call their dogs back as handlers do for racing dogs at the track?


Kristen with

Penguin (L the Penguin) Flying Penske x L Alysana

Costarring The Fabulous Felines: Squeak, Merlin, Bailey & Mystic

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The first dog we took in when my daughter & I started an adoption group was a wonderful coyote dog. Copper was aprox 4 & had been running his entire life, had a severe case of heartworms. He could climb my 4 ft fence but got along with my cats & didn't leave the yard very often. He was a very loving dog & got along with all the other dogs. He had a wonderful family adopt him & lived a good long life with them.The other coyote girl we took in was also a very loving dog, she got along with all dogs & cats & didn't want to leave the yard after she found her home. Go for it & enjot this boy.

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We adopted a lurcher last year. He was a field trial runner who was going to be shot. Someone took him literally at the last minute and got him into rescue.

 

We think he's mixed with coon hound, wanted to play with the cats at first. Mean cat fixed that quickly! He can clear a baby gate with no problem, but has never looked to jump out of the yard. (or any outdoor enclosure)

 

He's more dog than greyhound. Wants soooo badly to be a good boy. So obedience is fun for both of us. He's a digger in woodchips! He doesn't dig to get out of the yard, but to get me to hollar at him. Then he starts insane zoomies. Rinse and repeat! He's a hysterical hoot!

 

I would vote to go get this pup!


------

 

Jessica

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Hmm, maybe Catahoula Leopard Hound? They were bred to be hog dogs. The blue eyes are a distinctive feature.


Me & John Reese (Gable Dodge x O Jays) and the 4 kittehs!

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I adopted a dog bred for coyote hunting but the litter made it into adoption just after weening. She was 1/2 Deerhound. She could jump our fence, but never did it. She was raised with cats so we never had a problem. She was quite cautious of strange dogs, to the point of fear aggression when she was young. Working to boost her confidence around other dogs solved that. She could have run down anything, but never tried it. The only time I ever had a problem with her chasing was at agility class. If I lost her attention, usually because I was lost on the course or didn't keep in visual/verbal contact with her, she would sometimes take off to join another dog in an adjoining ring. The speed at which she darted towards the other dogs was breathtaking and for me it was heart-stopping when the other dog was a small morsel. Thankfully she had very good recall. She also did a couple practice runs with Whippets in lure coursing and if she lost sight of the lure, she would course the Whippets instead. Again that was heart-stopping, but at no time in agility or lure coursing did she actually treat the other dogs as prey. That didn't stop it from being scary.

 

Another of my dogs is a lurcher bred for hunting, though not coyotes. She did jump our fence a number of times in the beginning. Her reason for jumping was to get to us if we were outside the fence. Once she settled in and felt secure, she quit jumping. The only animal she has ever chased is my horse.

 

PS In agility, we worked very hard to coordinate her runs so she was not off leash at the same time as small dogs. It just wasn't always successful when multiple classes were in session at the same time.

Edited by kudzu

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Lilly is our coyote dog, but we got her as a puppy , so I'm not sure our experience is similar enough to give advice. She's also a full greyhound and not a cross. But I can say that, as with all true "rescues" you never really know until you try! He sounds adorable! And if he's calling to you then you should *at least* try!


Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

35764734494_93de5b5963_b.jpg

Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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Hmm, maybe Catahoula Leopard Hound? They were bred to be hog dogs. The blue eyes are a distinctive feature.

I think you nailed it. Not only does he have blue eyes, some of his black patches have a bit of mottling such as you would see in a blue leopard / blue merle Catahoula. They're popular crosses with greyhounds amongst coyote hunters so that makes complete sense.

 

You guys are giving me hope / enablement. Will find out more about this little dude and see if he could be a fit for our pack. :)

 

The group is also picking up some woolly ones that appear to be crossed with deerhounds or wolfhounds.

Edited by GreytNut

Kristen with

Penguin (L the Penguin) Flying Penske x L Alysana

Costarring The Fabulous Felines: Squeak, Merlin, Bailey & Mystic

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One of our hounds is a former coyote hunter. While probably not 100% greyhound - she's got a bit of wirey hair and is 50-55lbs. She bounced through several homes before we fostered (and eventually adopted) her because she would dig under fences to get out. We have a 6 ft wood fence and she has never given any indication of wanting to go over. But would definitely dig her way out if left unsupervised outside!

 

She does have a pretty good prey drive but is the most cuddly, loving couch potato ever!!

 

We just love her and wouldn't hesitate to adopt another coyote dog!


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Blue eyes occur in purebred Greyhounds. They aren't common and often turn amber (as puppies) but I know several adult Greyhounds with blue eyes (AKC and NGA).

 

I have not adopted a coyote dog but have had a hound used specifically for hunting and several that hunt our fenced property whether we want them to or not. One of my Ibizans' littermates spent years as a coyote hunter and, despite the breed's propensity for jumping exceptionally high, he did not escape yards and fields.

 

You might consider connecting with some open field coursing folks with questions on recall and training. I know some use whistles and such and their dogs wear gps collars. I can ask some of the OFC I know if you would like.

Edited by GreytHoundPoet

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Milo is a presumed lurcher, probably bred to be a hunting dog of who knows what. He weighs 60 lbs. He has a high prey drive toward everything smaller than him except other dogs. Also bigger things -- deer, and a neighborhood (very temporarily) bear. He has both speed and endurance. He has good obedience skills. He is good at recall in practice, and by some miracle has also come when called when he's escaped several times through spaces that I would have sworn were not big enough. He has never tried to jump our 5' fence, although it is clear that he could. In other words, he has jumped with ease through things that I would never dream a greyhound would try, but is contained by the fence barrier. I carry a squawker in the car trunk and he ran to it when I tested him, but the couple of times he escaped he came to voice recall. He is more fun than a barrel of monkeys.

 

We think he's mixed with coon hound,

JAJ2010 -- this is what I think Milo is, too.


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Ellen, Milo, and Jeter

remembering Eve, Baz, Scout, Romie, and Nutmeg

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There was a girl pair posted earlier this summer that had the merling--I hope they found a good home.


Me & John Reese (Gable Dodge x O Jays) and the 4 kittehs!

36938152140_1a2fd29a1f.jpg

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I think you nailed it. Not only does he have blue eyes, some of his black patches have a bit of mottling such as you would see in a blue leopard / blue merle Catahoula. They're popular crosses with greyhounds amongst coyote hunters so that makes complete sense.

 

You guys are giving me hope / enablement. Will find out more about this little dude and see if he could be a fit for our pack. :)a

 

The group is also picking up some woolly ones that appear to be crossed with deerhounds or wolfhounds.

Sounds like you now have a good guess as to the mix. Could also be some Australian Shepard in there instead. They're good working dogs and can have blue eyes. There may be other breeds in there too. This is a Lurcher that was bred to hunt. SO - you're looking at higher energy, higher prey drive than an AKC or NGA greyhound. A dog bred for speed, prey drive, and stamina. Do you want that? I'd be surprised if it can be cat-safe. Maybe indoors, but probably not outdoors. JMHO.

 

If this was a greyhound that was raised as a Coyote-dog, fine. But this is NOT a greyhound. This is a greyhound on steroids. I'm not saying DON'T do it. I'm just saying - KNOW that this is more than a greyhound. Think more "dog" than "greyhound". You're likely to get a dog that looks like a grey and acts like a Catahoola or Aussie, or something in-between.

 

I think - if this is the kind of dog you want - it could be great. This sounds like my DH's "Perfect Dog".

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Is there a link to a picture of this blue-eyed cowdoggy?


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Ellen, Milo, and Jeter

remembering Eve, Baz, Scout, Romie, and Nutmeg

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Found out just a little bit about him. We'll know much more after the group picks him up. He's going to stay first with a local foster family. I've been ill and can't travel right now, but DH will go there on his way home from a job and pick him up. The family will cat test him (not sure if it's actually their cat or a "volunteer") and see how he respects fences before we get him. If he doesn't work for our situation the initial foster family gets first dibs on him. I agree that we should know exactly what we're getting into before we adopt our first lurcher. He WILL have more energy than a typical greyhound, if only because he's just a year old. It's a safe bet that all of the toys which have been lying around collecting dust since Riley died will be put to the ultimate test. Whether that extra energy dissipates with age or not remains to be seen. But... we have a big yard, friends for him to play with, and DH had given up on ever having a running buddy. Our hounds tire too easily for that and have to be practically carried home. :P

 

Apparently he failed to make the grade as a coyote dog because along with being the runt of his litter he just didn't have the will to chase / hunt. Although he's only 45 lbs. we think he probably still has some growing to do. He has a super cute overbite. We still don't know exactly what he's crossed with, though you'll see in the pics below why Catahoula comes to mind. Aussie could be a possibility too, though I didn't know they were used for coyote hunting. The hunter will be able to give us all the details when he's picked up. Coyote and hog hunters know their dogs very well.

 

None of our greyhounds have ever been cat safe outside. Indoors, yes. Outdoors, any cat, rabbit, etc. that blunders into the yard is toast. Our cats are strictly indoors though and are never left unsupervised with the hounds just in case things go sideways. That has not happened but... ounce of prevention = pound of cure.

 

If it's not a good fit we won't force it.

 

This is Andy.

 

oWlf9ex.jpg

 

Catahoula leopard dog, blue merle. Both pics from Wikipedia Commons.

 

9VMTPtj.jpg

 

Catahoula leopard dog, red merle puppy. Check out those peepers. They come in a lot of strange colors including green, gold, odd, all shades of blue and sometimes more than one color in the same eye. Solid ice blue is the most common.

 

EH9ABrg.jpg

Edited by GreytNut

Kristen with

Penguin (L the Penguin) Flying Penske x L Alysana

Costarring The Fabulous Felines: Squeak, Merlin, Bailey & Mystic

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I hope he works out for you, he is gorgeous! When I was volunteering for our local humane society we got in a Catahoula leopard dog, he was turned in for repeatedly jumping a 7ft fence! He was a blue Merle with the blue eyes, such a sweetheart. He ended up being adopted by a rancher, it was a good fit. I really hope Andy is a good fit for you.

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GreytHoundPoet, if you don't mind asking the OFC folks how they call their dogs in that would be good. When our crew got out we were able to get everyone back using a squawker. They came to us like greased lightning. I was wondering if coyote hunters use the same techniques, just in case an escape were to happen.


Kristen with

Penguin (L the Penguin) Flying Penske x L Alysana

Costarring The Fabulous Felines: Squeak, Merlin, Bailey & Mystic

68sgSRq.jpg

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This is Andy.

Oh, my. (fans self) I do believe I feel a spasm coming on


siggy_z1ybzn.jpg

Ellen, Milo, and Jeter

remembering Eve, Baz, Scout, Romie, and Nutmeg

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If they are prey driven at all they should respond to a squawker, whether they've been trained to it or not. It imitates a prey distress call, so they *should* come running!


Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

35764734494_93de5b5963_b.jpg

Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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It's not universal. My retired racer didn't give a sh** about a squawker even if it was right nearby.

 

I've had one like that. He did, however, respond to a box of dog cookies being shaken. Too bad the sound doesn't carry far. :P

 

In case of emergency I do have an app on my phone's home screen called Predator Calls. It's designed for predator hunters. It's got rabbit, fawn and squirrel distress calls along with all sorts of coyote calls (never thought I might use the last set). The rabbit calls sound just like a squawker and are set as favorites, though the sound doesn't carry as far as the real deal. When it's all you've got on you though....


Kristen with

Penguin (L the Penguin) Flying Penske x L Alysana

Costarring The Fabulous Felines: Squeak, Merlin, Bailey & Mystic

68sgSRq.jpg

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It's not universal. My retired racer didn't give a sh** about a squawker even if it was right nearby.

 

Yes, I've had two that didn't give a rip about the squawker - one was my Stakes winner. However, both dogs who didn't respond (including the best racer) were actively fearful of small prey animals like cats and squirrels. I'm not sure how or if that correlates at all.


Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

35764734494_93de5b5963_b.jpg

Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

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