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Does Anyone In This Group Have A Greyhound That Has No Health Issues?


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I would generally consider greyhounds to be a healthy breed, but every breed has problems they are more at risk for, and almost every dog (even healthy ones) are likely to have one or two health issues if they live long enough.

 

11.5 year old Summit - diagnosed with pannus (a treatable but lifelong eye condition) at adoption at the age of 5.5. No issues up until this past May when he herniated a disc in his neck and had to have surgery for it. Has only had 1 dental cleaning while he's been with me, and that was only because I was taking off a small lump already and figured I might as well. The lump was benign.

 

4 year old Kili - had a persistent hymen resulting in recurrent UTIs as a puppy. Corrected with surgery at 7 months old. She's my problem child medically, but so far everything is relatively mild. From 10 months until about 3 years old she had some mild, ongoing back issues. She's an competitive agility and disc dog. She would get regular chiro treatments and sometimes laser and that kept things under control. It was never severe, it was only noticeable in agility. For the past year or so she seems to have sort of outgrown the problem. She still gets maintenance chiro, but she hasn't shown any evidence of pain and "needing" an adjustment in quite awhile. About once a year she also seems to have some mild allergies resulting in some mild skin issues that clear up easily on antibiotics. Currently she has a weird patch of scaly skin on her one wrist. It doesn't bother her so I've just left it alone. Teeth are beautiful, has never had a dental cleaning.

 

8 month old Kenna - no major health issues so far. She's caught a cough twice which went away with antibiotics, so was probably kennel cough. She also got round worms once and coccidia once. And the other day my boyfriend left her unsupervised for who knows how long, and I came home to discover she had eaten several toys. I had to drive back to work with her and make her vomit them up so they wouldn't get stuck.

 

I brush teeth daily which I swear by. It's not perfect because genetics play a role, but good oral hygiene goes a long way to avoiding or spacing out dentals.

Edited by krissy

Kristie and the Apex Agility Greyhounds: Kili (ATChC AgMCh Lakilanni Where Eagles Fly RN IP MSCDC MTRDC ExS Bronze ExJ Bronze ) and Kenna (Lakilanni Kiss The Sky RN MADC MJDC AGDC AGEx AGExJ). Waiting at the Bridge: Retired racer Summit (Bbf Dropout) May 5, 2005-Jan 30, 2019

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Guest Sportingfields

My personal experience with my 4 greys, 1 we lost to osteo @ age 6, we'd had him for 2 years. The other three were fine with the exception a few accidents that needed stitches and regular dentals despite daily brushing, until the age of the 10. That seemed to be our magic number for things going to heck in a hand basket. We lost one to kidney disease @ 12, one to osteo @ 10 and one to congestive heart failure @ 12.75. Age 13 was a number that we couldn't hit.

 

Due to our age & related health issues, we downsized to Whippets, same personality in a smaller package. Our rescue made it to 15, lost her to CHF, the other two came from breeder, was assured that this breed did not have the major health issues as greys. Lost those two from paralysis due to cervical disk disease, one had CHF and tumors growing on her neck and in her brain also. I've only heard of one Whippet with osteo, the rest is pretty much the same as greyhounds health. Through the grapevine, I've heard the breeding lines that are used for coursing are more hardy with less genetic problems than the show bred lines, although they still do occur.

 

IMO, only from my experience, greyhounds live 9-11 years, anything beyond that is a gift. Honestly, it is in your best interest to get pet insurance. Otherwise you risk paying out of pocket for the new wing on your vets office, as we did. Not complaining, it wasn't a financial hardship for us, just that isn't the case with everyone. Personality wise, you can't beat a Greyhound. They are truly a special breed and will forever have my heart, although it is doubtful that we'll ever own one again. For the moment, we are dogless although we recently adopted a 2 year old shelter cat, whom has urinary crystals that we need to deal with. I knew about this when we adopted him and took his health problems on without qualm. It really doesn't matter, if you want a pet, be ready to deal with health issues, whether purebred or mutt or cat.

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Bella = 11.5 years old. We have had her since she was 5. No serious issues, just yearly vet visits and basic shots. She is on Deramaxx now to relive any discomfort due to arthritis and such, and still does zoomies almost daily, as well as bounds up and down stairs and onto furniture. Only unexpected vet visit was because she sliced open her paw doing said zoomies :)

 

Kirby = 4 years old, we've had him 5 months. He's been a little more challenging as it took us a while to realize that he has allergies, so we're trying to figure out exactly what he is allergic to. He's been on Apoquel for a few weeks while we try and determine whether it's food, seasonal or environmental allergies.

Dave (GLS DeviousDavid) - 6/27/18
Gracie (AMF Saying Grace) - 10/21/12
Bella (KT Britta) - 4/29/05 to 2/13/20

 

 

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Both of my greys were very healthy until they developed the conditions that ended their lives. I know that sounds counter-intuitive, but what I mean is that they never had any medical problems at all for many years. One got cancer and the other kidney disease. They all die from something eventually.

Edited by sobesmom
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There's no way of knowing how healthy your greyhound will be, so I'd get health insurance for him or her as soon as you adopt. If you wait until you have a problem to get health insurance, that problem will be excluded as a "prior condition".

 

We've had amazing experience with Healthy Paws, and I highly recommend them: https://www.healthypawspetinsurance.com

 

Good luck with your adoption!

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I think Greyhounds are generally very healthy. They are not prone to many other joint aliments that plague other large breeds.

 

Nixon ran over 130 races. He turned 11 in June and has no issues. At all. We have had him for 6 years. Perhaps a bit slower going up our steep wooden staircase.

Ruby is 9 1/2 and raced over 80 times. She had to have two molars removed about 3 years ago. Nothing else.

Nigel is 8 and is also super healthy. He had a rather non-productive career with only 11 starts ;(

 

We have had many large breed dogs over the years. The 'mutts' were the healthiest and lived the longest...over 14 for one and another 12.

Our 'breed of choice' before we got 'into' Greyhounds was Dobermans. Wonderful, wonderful dogs, but only one made it age 10. Barely. Another passed at 7 and another at 8. Heart disease for 2 and bloat for the last one.

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Nancy...Mom to Sid (Peteles Tiger) and Kibo (112 Carlota Galgos).   Missing Casey, Gomer, Mona, Penelope, BillieJean, Bandit, Nixon (Starz Sammie),  Ruby (Watch Me Dash) and especially  Nigel (Nigel), waiting at the Bridge

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Glad you feel reassured. Just remember that because they are big dogs, their life spans are shorter than many smaller dogs'. And maintenance -- food, vaccines, flea protection, etc. -- will also cost more than for a small dog, because they require larger amounts.

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Ellen, Milo, and Jeter

remembering Eve, Baz, Scout, Romie, and Nutmeg

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Most breeds have genetic baggage. Check with the akc breed clubs and compare the other problems with those of the NGA track dogs and compare.

 

Temperament wise you can't beat a greyhound. Health wise,large dogs usually have shorter lives and along with prolonging life comes complications. Yes,there are some genetic predispositions:pannus,osteo,lumbar stenosis,a form of wonwilliebran(hemophilia), seizures and cons to mention a few. Not all dogs are afflicted. With any dog,mixed or purebred it's luck of the draw.

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ALL DOGS have medical issues from time to time.

 

My greyhound is almost 100% routine care.

 

I spent well over $15,000 on a mixed breed dog from the shelter.

 

If your #1 concern is vet bills, perhaps you should select a breed from the toy store? Just kidding--you can never tell if a dog you adopt is going to be healthy or not. Injuries are often preventable with some common sense. The digestive issues you see on GreyTalk don't really generally happen at the track, or with greyhound professionals. It seems to be an adopter issue.

 

My dog has vomited once in three years. Has great poops. Has never been injured, and so far his only problem seems to be a slight back problem.

 

No pet of any kind is without health issues except the kind that is stuffed.


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Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

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ALL DOGS have medical issues from time to time.

 

My greyhound is almost 100% routine care.

 

I spent well over $15,000 on a mixed breed dog from the shelter.

 

If your #1 concern is vet bills, perhaps you should select a breed from the toy store? Just kidding--you can never tell if a dog you adopt is going to be healthy or not. Injuries are often preventable with some common sense. The digestive issues you see on GreyTalk don't really generally happen at the track, or with greyhound professionals. It seems to be an adopter issue.

 

My dog has vomited once in three years. Has great poops. Has never been injured, and so far his only problem seems to be a slight back problem.

 

No pet of any kind is without health issues except the kind that is stuffed.

 

Not to totally hijack this thread, but would love your thoughts on why that is. :) I wish I knew what Kirby had eaten at the track as he seems to be allergic to everything except chicken.

Dave (GLS DeviousDavid) - 6/27/18
Gracie (AMF Saying Grace) - 10/21/12
Bella (KT Britta) - 4/29/05 to 2/13/20

 

 

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Guest Sportingfields

 

Not to totally hijack this thread, but would love your thoughts on why that is. :) I wish I knew what Kirby had eaten at the track as he seems to be allergic to everything except chicken.

Call the track and ask them to forward your name, phone # and email add to the kennel that Kirby raced in. Tell them you are in need of finding out what & how much they fed, as he's having tummy issues you can't resolve. Honestly in my experience, despite some folks doing thumbs down on kennel food, it works the best for some pups. They aren't going race if they don't feel good. Always good to have a great relationship with their trainers, they know their dogs well :)

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We also have a super healthy, sturdy greyhound. We've had Marvin for 4.5+ years now, adopting him just as he was turning 3. He has awesome teeth, minus some damage from chewing on metal crate bars during his track days, and he has one needed one dental with us, just recently because I pushed for it. He loves his inexpensive IAMS green bag food (it's my parents' pug who needs crazy expensive special food). Aside from his occasional interest to eat something he shouldn't (with no indication that he would ever have contemplated doing so in the weeks/months/years prior to said 'eating events'), he has had zero health issues. Not even minor ones. The health and medical board does scare me sometimes, but it's there for people to seek help and advice. Most every breed of dog has something to keep an eye out for, and I feel so much more prepared to address any issues should they arise with the support of this community. Greyhounds rock :)

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I feel like I should knock on wood by writing this, but I also have two healthy hounds. Luna is 9.5 and Nova is 7.5. Neither of my girls have ever had vet visits beyond their annual exam and one dental cleaning each. My first greyhound that I had while growing up was also very healthy, until around his 13 birthday, when old age crept in and starting catching up to him. Really, it is just luck of the draw. But, as far as purebred dogs go, greyhounds are relatively healthy.

Laura, mom to Luna (Boc's Duchess) and Nova (Atascocita Venus).
Forever in my heart, Phantom (Tequila Nights) and Zippy (Iruska Monte).

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ALL DOGS have medical issues from time to time.

 

My greyhound is almost 100% routine care.

 

I spent well over $15,000 on a mixed breed dog from the shelter.

 

If your #1 concern is vet bills, perhaps you should select a breed from the toy store? Just kidding--you can never tell if a dog you adopt is going to be healthy or not. Injuries are often preventable with some common sense. The digestive issues you see on GreyTalk don't really generally happen at the track, or with greyhound professionals. It seems to be an adopter issue.

 

My dog has vomited once in three years. Has great poops. Has never been injured, and so far his only problem seems to be a slight back problem.

 

No pet of any kind is without health issues except the kind that is stuffed.

TONE??? Seriously? A potential new adopter is asking an intelligent, thoughtful question and you need to go there? In that way? Why? They never said vet costs were their #1 concern, they just asked for information. Condescension is neither appropriate nor called for.

 

The back-handed insult to people with greys with digestive issues is also noted.

 

You can share your insights without insulting people if you try.

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Most breeds have genetic baggage. Check with the akc breed clubs and compare the other problems with those of the NGA track dogs and compare.

Temperament wise you can't beat a greyhound. Health wise,large dogs usually have shorter lives and along with prolonging life comes complications. Yes,there are some genetic predispositions:pannus,osteo,lumbar stenosis,a form of wonwilliebran(hemophilia), seizures and cons to mention a few. Not all dogs are afflicted. With any dog,mixed or purebred it's luck of the draw.

Oh,i wanted to add pancreatitis and other digestive problems. Annie,who as a young dog,under 7, could eat ground tires. Now she has colitis,not from too many tires,the vet mentioned just about every greyhound has digestive issues as they age.

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I would argue that if you are alive, you have health Issues - it is a requisite of life. Look at your friends, family, coworkers, pets of all species/breeds, and yourself. I don't mean this to sound harsh, but we all have greater or lesser health issues to deal with. These are mostly due to the luck of the draw, or the genetics we had no control over.

 

Twelve years ago, after having all of my pets at that point die from cancer (cats & non-sighthound dogs), I asked my vet "What am I doing wrong????" He said: Nothing. You are giving them the care that they need so that nothing is left to claim them except cancer". Maybe that is true, maybe not, but it helped me at the time.

 

Now, I have the exception to the rule: Twiggy has defeated osteosarcoma (diagnosed/amp'd/chemo'd at 6 years old, now 12 years old), but her kidneys are struggling. Something gets all of us in the end.

 

Greyhounds have as long a life-span or more as any similarly large breed dog. And they are amazing. If you feel one would be a good fit for your home and lifestyle - go for it!

Wendy with Twiggy, fosterless while Twiggy's fighting the good fight, and Donnie & Aiden the kitties

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If your #1 concern is vet bills, perhaps you should select a breed from the toy store? Just kidding--you can never tell if a dog you adopt is going to be healthy or not. Injuries are often preventable with some common sense. The digestive issues you see on GreyTalk don't really generally happen at the track, or with greyhound professionals. It seems to be an adopter issue.

 

 

 

 

Not to totally hijack this thread, but would love your thoughts on why that is. :) I wish I knew what Kirby had eaten at the track as he seems to be allergic to everything except chicken.

Of course, few GTers actually know firsthand what goes on in the track kennels digestivewise and what the trainers do to cure/avoid them. IMO adopters who want "the very best for their dog' feed food that is expensive and too rich for their dog. My longtime trainer friend fed his dogs Purina Hi-Pro, 4-D meat, vegetables, pasta and a supplement called(I think) Clovalite. To the best of my knowledge until Purina discontinued it a great many trainers fed Hi-Pro.

 

There is one trainer still fairly active on here. I'll PM her to chime in.

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Joy is healthy. Apparently when she came off the track in March of 2015, she had some sort of respiratory problem but she's fine now. She has been at the vet a few times for eating what she shouldn't eat (wild mushroom, 2 bags of raisins, and a high protein human snack).


Carol, missing Magic (1/5/01 - 4/15/15) but welcoming Fuzzy's Joy Behar (Joy) into my life on 5/31/15.

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I am sure there are a lot of healthy Greyhounds out there, but mine were not healthy. I lost Huck at 6 from bone cancer. Lady at 11 from bone cancer. David is still alive at 11, but Huck, Lady and DaVid have had to go to vet for corn removal once a week for their whole life. DaVid has had back surgery 2 times and it was thousands of dollars each time. Lady had back surgery 3 times and it was again thousands of dollars. I also have 2 Galgos and so far they seem very healthy. I have Trupanion insurance on DaVid and Healthy Paws on Mousie and Ronnie (Ronaldo). Insurance REALLY pays off. I told my vet I will not consider getting another Greyhound, but would definitely consider a Galgo. But, your story may be different in a few years and I do wish you the best.

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Of course, few GTers actually know firsthand what goes on in the track kennels digestivewise and what the trainers do to cure/avoid them. IMO adopters who want "the very best for their dog' feed food that is expensive and too rich for their dog. My longtime trainer friend fed his dogs Purina Hi-Pro, 4-D meat, vegetables, pasta and a supplement called(I think) Clovalite. To the best of my knowledge until Purina discontinued it a great many trainers fed Hi-Pro.

 

There is one trainer still fairly active on here. I'll PM her to chime in.

Hi Pam :wave

 

Yep, the dreaded 4 D meat, whichever kibble you liked. That ranged from Purina brands to Diamond, I know one who fed nutro, another fed that science diet crap. :sick Figure for a kennel of 60-70 greys, you used about 100 lbs of meat, Then you had add ins, Fish meal, bone meal, flax, veggies, fruits, stews, There were also a variety of vitamins and supplements to add in. Bones, some fed raw bones, some cooked. Some used marrow bones like femurs, others used knuckle bones. I'm afraid that a lot of the broken fangs come from the bones, not from crate chewing.

 

You really had to know your individual dogs. When they first come to the kennel, you clean them up, worm them, sometimes use antibiotics like tf 15 (a powder) if they're coming from far away. Sometimes they get sick from changes in water and food and the different bacterias in a given area. Then you had to figure out their optimum weight by body style and form. You adjust their feed according to that and if they are easy keepers or hard keepers. Some dogs hold their weight very well, (the easy ones), Others weight fluctuates up and down so you really have to keep an eye on intake.

 

Cookies of some sort are readity available. Everything from actual dog biscuits to Nilla wafers or vanilla sandwich cookies. I used to give them all Yogurt (active cultures) about once a month, or if they had to be wormed. Probiotics are favorites of some trainers. Pre race snack could be anything, from a little portion of regular feed to a mackerel noodle concoction to honey based snacks. That said, I feed all my greyhounds at home straight out of the kennel feed tub and they all did very well until age related stuff started hitting them around age 10. Except for Bernie who dies at 7 with some bizarre form of leukemia. My vet was very surprised, he had never seen that in a grey before. He was very experienced with greys, we all took our track dogs to him and our pets. Sometimes it's just a crap shoot.

Edited by Cheryl2

Those who would give up Essential Liberty
to purchase a little Temporary Safety,
deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
Ben Franklin

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I think it's just the luck of the draw. I had 6 greyhounds over the past 20 years. Two passed away from cancer at the ages of 10 and 8 both boys were very healthy up until they became ill. Two lived to age 14 and 15 and had very few health issues (one had corns but other then that was very healthy). My current boys are 8 and 6. They are active and healthy, although this past summer my 6 year old had acute gastroenteritis which was costly because he had to stay at the emergency vet for two days. He is totally fine now. Also this past summer (this was a bad summer!) my 8 year old boy stepped on something very sharp (we were walking in the park not even running) and whatever it was cut his paw pad almost to the bone. He needed sutures and had to be put under for the surgery and was bandaged up for two weeks. That was also expensive. But thankfully neither of my dogs have chronic issues. They eat a raw diet, get lots of exercise, I live in an apartment so we go for daily long walks and some of leash running when possible. I am also one of these neurotic dog owners who constantly worries that something is wrong! LOL!

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Cookies of some sort are readity available. Everything from actual dog biscuits to Nilla wafers or vanilla sandwich cookies.

...and marshmallows. Anyone who visited the GHOF during certain years will remember people leaving Twinkies at the throne of talentedmrripley. The dog was Twinkie obsessed.

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Guest DarkHorse

I would like to add that the single most expensive issue we've dealt with came at the paws of Tycho, our little cat. Having to take him in to the e-vet for a urinary blockage and then getting it treated and the tests afterwards were upwards of $3000 - Dexter's final weeks were about $2000. He's probably been our overall costliest animal, too, though that's a little more difficult to tell. He's been on vet food for almost four years now, which is not cheap. A quick tally says about $6000 on him (and we've had him 4 years so far), and about $6500 on Dexter, who we had for 8. Araley was about $4000 for seven years, because she never had surgery and we didn't get to do many tests before losing her. So Tycho will easily eclipse both of them, especially as we can expect another 8-10 years with him (I'm estimating about $10,000 total, even if he never has anything other than yearly visits until the end).

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I have had 7 greyhounds thus far. On the average, they haven't been very costly. I have had cats who cost more. I also got several of them as seniors and that costs more simply due to age. I lost Dante one week shy of 12 due to a broken leg (bone cancer). He had NO symptoms prior to coming home to a broken leg dog. Zoe arrested after a dental at 11.25 years. She had horrific teeth no matter what I did. Brady died at 13 - his body gave out. I got him at 11 and he was a hot mess when he arrived. Goose developed a nerve sheath tumor at 9.75 and we couldn't manage his pain. Maverick broke his leg while running in the yard with Fancy. Again, no symptoms prior to the break. At least I was there when it happened. Fancy is 7 going on 3 and Paris is 3. I feed raw and Fancy jogs 2-5 miles 3 times a week. Paris is the laziest dog I have ever had the privilege of catering. She was a winner on the track, injured her tricep and has wholly embraced the couch, lol.

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Cindy with Miss Fancypants
Dante (Dg's Boyd), Zoe (In a While), Brady (Devilish Effect), Goose (BG Shotgun), Maverick (BG ShoMe) and Indy (BYB whippet) forever in my heart
The flame that burns the brightest, burns the fastest and leaves the biggest shadow

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