Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Vampiric_Conure

Question About Longivity

Recommended Posts

I was just told by someone that retired racing Greyhounds don't age so well because they're bred only for racing. Also the rate of cancer is higher? Is there any truth to this? Ideas? Experiences? .../n00b questions, LOL


Beware of dog? Forget the dog - BEWARE OF CAT! No wait. The budgie is a killer, too.

 

35618219502_5f27c04249_s.jpgAaerro by Vampiric Conure, on Flickr

 

Rainbow Bridge - Aaerro march 2018

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would say they age as well as other large dogs and better than some. Yes they are bred for racing, but that means they are relatively healthy dogs with good temperments-their owners/trainers don't waste time on unhealthy dogs or dogs with bad temperaments. Their breedings are carefully planned. But show dogs are bred for their looks and temperament so there isn't much difference. Neither type of owners/breeders really look at quality of aging in the dogs. But looking at other old dogs that I have known, I would say they are no different from other dog breeds.

 

That said, greyhounds live about 12 years, plus or minus, similar to other large dogs. And like all long-legged dogs they are prone to bone cancer. And they do get other kinds of cancers but again no more than other breeds and fewer than some. I've had 5 greyhounds, only 2 died from cancers one of which was bone cancer.

Edited by Scoutsmom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the National Canine Cancer Foundation:

 

Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor found in dogs. It accounts for up to 85% of all malignancies originating in the skeleton. It mostly occurs in middle aged to older dogs, with a median age of 7 years. Primary rib OS tends to occur in younger adult dogs with a median age of 4.5 to 5.4 years. Larger breeds have a high propensity for the disease. Dogs like Great Dane, Irish setter, Doberman pinscher, Rottweiler, German Shepherd and Golden Retriever are at greater risk of contracting osteosarcoma because of their size and weight. Intact males and females are also highly predisposed.

 

 

Although they aren't named in that list, greyhounds fit the description of "larger breeds." A Greyhound is more likely to suffer from osteosarcoma than a smaller breed is. But it's not necessarily related to racing since Great Danes, Irish setters, Doberman pinschers, Rotties, GSDs and Goldens are on the osteo list, and none of those breeds race. But osteo can appear in the same limbs as previous injuries, and if your retired racer has an old race injury, you might see any osteo that does occur show up in the previously injured leg.

I've lost four greyhounds, and I have two at present:

  • Oreo, lost to a blood clot during surgery at age 8, but the surgery was to repair a broken leg where osteo probably was present; she had unreadable tattoos, so I have no idea about her racing career except that I got her when she was 4 and she had bounced from another home so she couldn't have raced for long
  • Jacey, lost to an unexpected immune system failure at age 8; a double-handful of not impressive races at one of the worst tracks in the country
  • Sam, lost to a variety of old age symptoms at age 13; never raced, never trained
  • Tigger, lost to osteo at nearly 9; he was a successful, long-term racer with no previous injuries recorded; son of Flying Penske, who is not from one of the more common osteo lines
  • Silver, still chugging along at nearly 11 and a half; a successful racer until she retired with a slipped Achilles tendon eight years ago
  • Q, just 4, retired with a bone screw in his hock after a mediocre racing career that ended with a crash in January

So I've lost three 8-year-olds, and that's not common; one of them--maybe two of them--had osteo. Also, all the dogs but Silver were immediately spayed or neutered at the end of their careers. Silver wasn't spayed until I got my hands on her when she was six years old.

 


15060353021_97558ce7da.jpg
Kathy and Q (CRT Qadeer from Fuzzy's Cannon and CRT Bonnie) and
Jane (WW's Aunt Jane from Trent Lee and Aunt M); photos to come.

Missing Silver (5.19.2005-10.27.2016), Tigger (4.5.2007-3.18.2016),
darling Sam (5.10.2000-8.8.2013), Jacey-Kasey (5.19.2003-8.22.2011), and Oreo (1997-3.30.2006)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are generally healthy dogs, but they are considered a "large breed" which means they have a propensity for some diseases and conditions at a higher rate. We've had eight greyhounds and lost 5 - kidney failure (at 10 years of age), osteo (10), stroke (12), Protein Losing Enteropathy (11), liver cancer (11). We also had a foster who eventually died due to heart failure at 12. Average age in the literature says 12-15 years, and it's not uncommon for them to be teenagers.

 

I will say there is something very special about senior greyhounds, and though having them age can be hard, they are completely the sweetest, most loving dogs when they get there. Most of the greys we've had have been very active and spunky up until they were 10 or 11 years old, and only slowed down gradually after that.


Chris - Mom to: Lilly, Felicity (DeLand), and Andi (Braska Pandora)

35764734494_93de5b5963_b.jpg

Angels: Libby (Everlast), Dorie (Dog Gone Holly), Dude (TNJ VooDoo), Copper (Kid's Copper), Cash (GSI Payncash), Toni (LPH Cry Baby), Whiskey (KT's Phys Ed), Atom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a list of the ages I lost my girls. You can judge by this.

 

Topaz - 5 liver disease

Brindle - 8 hemangiosarcoma

Pearl - 12 hemangiosarcoma

Diamond - 12 osteosarcoma

Crystal - 11 hemangiosarcoma

Onyx - 15 hind end paralysis

Opal - 10 mauling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Sportingfields

Just from personal experience, I think 9-11 is more realistic than 12-15 I also don't believe this has anything to do with whether they raced or not.

 

IMO, anything over 11 is a gift and 14-15 yr olds are exceptional blessings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I expect the person who told you that was on the anti-racing side of the discussion.

 

Typically, the larger the breed, the shorter the lifespan. The so-called giant breeds often don't live past 8 or 9. Lap dogs tend to live the longest.

 

I think greyhounds live as long as any other large breed dog. I grew up with English setters, and although we had one make it to 15, none of the rest made it to their teens. Most dogs die of some form of cancer or another, although it is true that greyhounds seem to have more bone cancer than other breeds, but it has nothing to do with whether they raced or not.



Hamish-siggy1.jpg

Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest DarkHorse

So far of our four, we've only lost one. Araley died at 10.5 of liver cancer. Dexter will be turning 12 in December and he's not showing any real problems. Although he's a little off right now, but the vet thinks it's probably Giardia or possibly worms, which can strike at any age.

 

I do think some adoption groups over sell the greyhound lifespan. I think 11 or 12 is a reasonable average age, but obviously they can die from illness and disease at any age. But the average age is certainly not much different from other similar sized dogs. My parents have had two large dogs, a mutt (GSD/Lab, about 65-70lbs) who was put down at about 10 due to unmanageable pain, and a lab (about 80-90lbs) who is 6 months younger than Dexter and doing just as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest sireltonsmom

My Sir Elton passed at 14.5. I have a 12 year old now and a 6 year old. They are the best and easiest breed of dog to have. :ghplaybow :gh_runner:ghplaybow

Sir Elton Mindy Beau

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our kids:

 

Gracie - 10.5 - bone cancer

Annie - 11 - kidney disease

Steely - 11 - heart disease

Payne - 11 - bone cancer

Bindi - 6 - heart attack

Twilite - 14 - old age

Janie - 12 - collapsed esophagus

Sophie - 13 - did not wake up from a dental

Dazzle - will be 11 in March, and is in good health :-)

Tangerine - will be 8 in January and is in good health, except for arthritis from a badly broken leg when she was a puppy

 

Bindi's sudden death shattered us. The only consolation was that it was instant and we were there.


 

Jackie with Tangerine and Chimes

Always missing Gracie, Steely, Annie, Payne, Twilite, Janey Bug, Bindi, Sophie, and Dazzle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dogs bred for work purposes, actually tend to be a LOT healthier dogs. Greyhounds do not have a lot of hereditary problems (hip dysplasia, etc.) that most large breed purebreds have as they have been bred for a sound body (not looks for the show ring). Working sleddogs and sheepdogs tend to be quite healthy as well. Greyhounds are unfortunately prone to things like osteo, which could be more prevalent in some racing lines. As a whole though, I am thankful that greyhounds have not been bred large scale in the pet/breeder industry.... it has ruined a lot of breeds.

Edited by RedHead

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wheat - 4 - hit by car

Icabod - 11 - hemangiosarcoma

Scarlett - 12.5 - was diagnosed with a spindle cell tumor but died from electrocution

Rhett - 14 - old age, suffered from lumbosacaral stenosis

Dixie - 12 - laryngeal paralysis

Pogo - 8 - bone cancer


Annette, mom to Miriam (Miriam of Ruckus) & Casey (kitty), wife to Roy. Mom to bridgekids: Wheat (GH), Icabod (GH), Scarlett (Cab's Peg Bundy), Rhett (Kiowa Day Juice), Dixie (Pazzo Dixie), and Pogo/Gleason (Rambunctious) and Spooky, Taffy, Garfield, & Lefty (kitties)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Little Girl - 4.5 - AIHA
Harley - 6 - Got out or went over fence after a storm and was HBC. Five other dogs were safe in the yard.
Bella - just shy of 11 - spinal problems
Rex - 6 - GME
Buck - 9 - Osteo
Buddy - 9 - Lymphoma

My vet from Ohio State says 9 - 12 is probably a more reasonable time frame than 12 - 14. As much as I adore them I'll never have another grey. The ones that I had almost bankrupted me in vet bills. Their medical care was far more than my dobie, yorkies, poodles and mixes. Maybe I just always drew the wrong hand.

 

Sometimes I wonder if it is partly because there are so few tremendously popular sires (like Molotov with almost 8,000 offspring) that both good and bad things get amplified in greys...beside the fact well know racing owners have bred litter brothers and sisters. Who could ever think that was a good idea? :dunno


Scarlett - 12.5 - was diagnosed with a spindle cell tumor but died from electrocution

 

:grouphug. I was there. :(


gallery_8149_3261_283.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As much as I adore them I'll never have another grey. The ones that I had almost bankrupted me in vet bills. Their medical care was far more than my dobie, yorkies, poodles and mixes. Maybe I just always drew the wrong hand.

 

 

I understand vet bills. Miriam cost us over $3000.00 just last week and we still do not know what is ailing her. Don't even want to think about Pogo's bills.


Annette, mom to Miriam (Miriam of Ruckus) & Casey (kitty), wife to Roy. Mom to bridgekids: Wheat (GH), Icabod (GH), Scarlett (Cab's Peg Bundy), Rhett (Kiowa Day Juice), Dixie (Pazzo Dixie), and Pogo/Gleason (Rambunctious) and Spooky, Taffy, Garfield, & Lefty (kitties)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nixon 11, Ruby 9 and Nigel 8 are all alive and thriving.

 

The three Dobermans that we owned prior to them did not make it to age 10. Heart disease.

Our 'mutts' made it to 12 and 14.


NSK-Winter.jpg.a6ea578c2e544932c5222b81cda3216d.jpg

Nancy...Mom to Nigel (Nigel) , Sid (Peteles Tiger) and Kibo (112 Carlota Galgos)Missing Casey, Gomer, Mona, Penelope, BillieJean, Bandit, Nixon (Starz Sammie) and especially Ruby (Watch Me Dash) waiting at the Bridge.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Longevity and good health are obviously connected and good breeders strive to breed for good health & longevity, not just athletic ability that lasts for 3-5 years or a beautiful dog that has a slew of health issues. But this is a controversial subject. So in my personal greyhound owner experience I had 6 greyhounds including my two current boys:

Corky: raced until he was 4 fairly successful. He died at 10 of hemangiosarcoma

Lance: adopted by me at 10 months of age he ran a few races and was retired. Died at 14 back end issues/LS

Henry: adopted by me at age 2 he barely raced. Died at age 15 age related/back end issues/LS

Primetime was a fairly successful racer adopted by me when he was 4. Died of osteo at age 8

 

My current boys are Onyx age 8 doing well and Jasper age 6 also doing well. Knock on wood! I am paranoid about every little thing.

Edited by forevergrey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was just told by someone that retired racing Greyhounds don't age so well because they're bred only for racing. Also the rate of cancer is higher? Is there any truth to this? Ideas? Experiences? .../n00b questions, LOL

Loca, 13.5 - osteosarcoma

Treasure, 12 - osteosarcoma

Phoenix, 11 - osteosarcoma

 

I've read research that suggests that since dogs are bred for speed, little consideration is given to whether osteo is in a particular genetic line. I would agree with your friend.


siggy_robinw_tbqslg.jpg
Xavi the galgo and Allen the cat. Missing Iker the galgo ?-Feb.9/19, Treasure (USS Treasure) April 12/01-May 6/13, Phoenix (Hallo Top Son) Dec.14/99-June 4/11 and Loca (Reko Swahili) Oct.9/95 - June 1/09.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately cancer takes most dogs regardless of breed. Greyhounds live a decent length of time however many are cut short due to Osteo or another type of cancer. We have lost two at 8.5 and 9.5 yrs, one to Osteo the other to a believed embolism. We hope we are luckier with Stewie and get to enjoy his senior years. Our girl Shelby who we adopted at 11 lived to 14 so it is a toss up on how long they will live. Genetics definitely plays a part just like it does in other breeds. Just love them while you have them.


Kyle with Stewie ('Super C Ledoux, Super C Sampson x Sing It Blondie) and forever missing my three angels, Jack ('Roy Jack', Greys Flambeau x Miss Cobblepot) and Charlie ('CTR Midas Touch', Leo's Midas x Hallo Argentina) and Shelby ('Shari's Hooty', Flying Viper x Shari Carusi) running free across the bridge.

Gus an coinnich sinn a'rithist my boys and little girl.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My greyhounds both died of soft tissue sarcomas. Sahara was 8.5; Coltrane was 11.5. It was hard because neither were ailing or showing many signs of aging prior to the cancers.


Rebecca
with Atlas the borzoi, Luna the pyr, and Madison the cat, always missing Sahara(Flyin Tara Lyn) and Coltrane(Blue on By) the greyhounds

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Specky was 10 - spleen and liver tumors

 

Gizzy was just shy of 14 - old age. Her body just gave out on her, mostly her rear end.

 

Riley was 13 - old age. His back end could no longer support him and he was in pain and stopped eating very much.

 

Specky was the easiest to make the 'decision' for. Our vet performed a splenectomy, but after the spleen was out he could see that the liver was covered in tumors. We opted to euthanize her while she was under anesthetic.

 

Gizzy told us clearly that she was ready to go. Tried several different medications, but in the end her rear end just gave up on her.

 

Neither Gizzy or Specky were successful racers. Both were adopted when they were two years old, so basically they had no race career.

 

Riley was a difficult decision. We probably could have let him go longer, but his quality of life was poor, and he was in pain. My DH and I are firm believers in the adage of 'better a day early then a day late', so we let him go before the pain got worse. An old racing injury to his rear leg definitely played into his condition, as that leg had always been weak for him. He was a strong racer and had quite a few races.


gallery_9381_2904_4242.jpg

Molly Weasley Carpenter-Caro - Standard Poodle 2 Year Old Teenager!!

Gizzy, Specky, Riley Roo & Lady - Our beloved Greyhounds waiting at the Rainbow Bridge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Diesel -11 osteosarcoma

Sully - 12.5 heart failure most likely but he had several things going on as well as the heart issues- LP as well as LS which had gotten pretty bad.
Sebau (mutt - GSD x Dalmatian x Shar-pei) 19 - seizures (most likely brain tumor/cancer per vet as she had never had seizures before)


In vino veritas
Rachael with Rook, missing Sully, Sebau, and Diesel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you everyone :) Seems that Greyhounds are on par with whippets and larger breeds of dog when it comes to longevity, as what many of you have said. My Family whippets lived to be 12 and a bit (cancer), 13 and a bit (Stroke that made family decide to PTS) and almost 14 (Old age). Who knows how long my whippet cross will live :)


Beware of dog? Forget the dog - BEWARE OF CAT! No wait. The budgie is a killer, too.

 

35618219502_5f27c04249_s.jpgAaerro by Vampiric Conure, on Flickr

 

Rainbow Bridge - Aaerro march 2018

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...