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Friend's Greyhound Pees Indoors Whenever He Visits - Help!


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My friend has had her greyhound for 8-9 months now - he is a 2 year old male tripod and has been adjusting to life on 3 legs quite well for the most part. Sometimes she brings him over to our place to visit our greyhound Max, but lately he has gotten himself un-invited because he cannot hold his pee in for even an hour or two! Our friend thought that he was housebroken, but she says that he used to soil his crate and still pees on her mat by the door. She has taken him to the vet and the vet has ruled out a UTI, Diabetes, and other medical issues so it seems to be behavioral.

 

Obviously we don't want him coming over until he is better housebroken, but I just don't get why, close to a year after adoption, he still doesn't understand that he needs to go potty outside only. We had the back sliding door OPEN and he still chose to pee in our hallway. He does not respond AT ALL to a sharp "No!" or any sort of verbal reprimand. I have no idea how to offer help to our friend on this subject as our boy was a dream to train and we've never had any problems on this front. Now our friend wants Miles (the pesky piddler) to be invited back, saying that she doesn't think there will be any more problems, but our carpet begs to differ.

 

Please help! Is this a behavioral issue? Could he just not be potty trained after all this time? How do you potty train a dog that doesn't respond to verbal reprimands OR positive reinforcement (she still "Good Potty"s him for every outdoor pee and poo after all this time, so it's definitely not that he hasn't had positive reinforcement).

Loving life with my first greyhound Max (4 year old dark brindle boy)! :wub:

Check out our hiking blog! www.greythikes.blogspot.com

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Sometimes they have difficulty "signalling" that they have to go. Keep in mind they did everything that humans told them to do and when, i.e. they were let out of their crates to eliminate at routine times at the track, so they never had to say when they had to go, they just went when they were told to do so. Ryder also never signalled when he had to go. I had to learn that his pacing around the house was a sign. There was no other indicator. Kasey on the other hand stood by the door.

 

Of course naturally, have the dog eliminate before coming in the house, watch when he drinks water and for how long. For instance, I know if Ryder has a big slug of water, I should know that in about an hour he should go out. I do this to make sure he won't pee in doors, and I'll do it because I'd rather be safe than sorry! Take him out regularly and routinely. Routine really is the key. SOme also have hard time developing that "bladder of steel". He might just be one of those dogs that can't or won't hold it.

 

You mention he's a tripod....is he on any other meds right now that would increase thirst or other symptoms like that?

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Of course naturally, have the dog eliminate before coming in the house, watch when he drinks water and for how long. For instance, I know if Ryder has a big slug of water, I should know that in about an hour he should go out. I do this to make sure he won't pee in doors, and I'll do it because I'd rather be safe than sorry! Take him out regularly and routinely. Routine really is the key. SOme also have hard time developing that "bladder of steel". He might just be one of those dogs that can't or won't hold it.

 

You mention he's a tripod....is he on any other meds right now that would increase thirst or other symptoms like that?

 

She does have Miles go potty before he comes in, then he'll go out once or twice for a visit that's only 2-3 hours. He had already gone out to potty twice this last time and still unleashed a bucket of pee on our carpet. :ohno Like you mention, he just seems to not want to hold it at all.

 

He does seem to drink a lot of water, but he's not on any medication (As far as I know, and I'm pretty sure about that). This last visit, we put the water bowl out of reach, but that's not really fair to my boy, because then he can't drink if he is thirsty.

Loving life with my first greyhound Max (4 year old dark brindle boy)! :wub:

Check out our hiking blog! www.greythikes.blogspot.com

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No reprimands.

 

Keep him on leash (or at least in the same room with you, so you can watch him), and if he starts to make a move, cheerful "Let's go out!" and convey him outside and praise.

 

If he's peeing a bucket, he isn't just marking -- he has to go, badly.

Star aka Starz Ovation (Ronco x Oneco Maggie*, litter #48538), Coco aka Low Key (Kiowa Mon Manny x Party Hardy, litter # 59881), and mom in Illinois
We miss Reko Batman (Trouper Zeke x Marque Louisiana), 11/15/95-6/29/06, Rocco the thistledown whippet, 04/29/93-10/14/08, Reko Zema (Mo Kick x Reko Princess), 8/16/98-4/18/10, the most beautiful girl in the whole USA, my good egg Joseph aka Won by a Nose (Oneco Cufflink x Buy Back), 09/22/2003-03/01/2013, and our gentle sweet Gidget (Digitizer, Dodgem by Design x Sobe Mulberry), 1/29/2006-11/22/2014, gone much too soon. Never forgetting CJC's Buckshot, 1/2/07-10/25/10.

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No reprimands.

 

Keep him on leash (or at least in the same room with you, so you can watch him), and if he starts to make a move, cheerful "Let's go out!" and convey him outside and praise.

 

If he's peeing a bucket, he isn't just marking -- he has to go, badly.

 

If/when he is invited back to our home, I'll make sure his owner has him on a leash the whole time. That is good advice, thank you.

 

(Though, at this point, I'm leaning towards not having him come over at any point in the foreseeable future for the sake of our carpets and our rental deposit.)

Edited by inaandmax

Loving life with my first greyhound Max (4 year old dark brindle boy)! :wub:

Check out our hiking blog! www.greythikes.blogspot.com

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No reprimands.

 

Keep him on leash (or at least in the same room with you, so you can watch him), and if he starts to make a move, cheerful "Let's go out!" and convey him outside and praise.

 

If he's peeing a bucket, he isn't just marking -- he has to go, badly.

This. And honestly, it's not the end of the world if your dog doesn't have access to water for a few hours provided he doesn't have a medical condition.

 

Fyi, I have a friend whose male dog guzzled water when he comes over. He does it because he's somewhat stressed. Does the same thing when they travel or when his mom dogsits. Eventually if he stays for any length of time it lessens. So we just watch him like a hawk and he runs him out if there's any question.

 

If the dog's behavior is like this at home though, I would wonder if they're not missing something medical. Cushing's isn't always easy to spot and would cause those symptoms. I might suggest a urinalysis to see what his specific gravity is like. If his urine is dilute, they might want to dig further.

Edited by NeylasMom

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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Fyi, I have a friend whose male dog guzzled water when he comes over. He does it because he's somewhat stressed. Does the same thing when they travel or when his mom dogsits. Eventually if he stays for any length of time it lessens. So we just watch him like a hawk and he runs him out if there's any question.

 

If the dog's behavior is like this at home though, I would wonder if they're not missing something medical. Cushing's isn't always easy to spot and would cause those symptoms. I might suggest a urinalysis to see what his specific gravity is like. If his urine is dilute, they might want to dig further.

The stress thing makes a lot of sense to me. Our friend told us that her vet described Miles as "a nervous wreck" in general.

 

I really doubt she will spring for an expensive test, so I hope it is just nerves and not Cushing's, but I will definitely pass on the info, thank you.

Loving life with my first greyhound Max (4 year old dark brindle boy)! :wub:

Check out our hiking blog! www.greythikes.blogspot.com

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I can't believe no one has suggested a belly band!

 

I would absolutely ask your friend to have him wear one, or leave him at home.

 

Yes I think she has one for him that he wore for only a few days after she got him & I wish I'd remembered it sooner!! It will be a must for future visits, along with the leash and no water. Hopefully that will cover everything.

 

I did send my friend a link on Cushing's and she doesn't seem too interested in pursuing it since Miles is only 2 years old. :\

Loving life with my first greyhound Max (4 year old dark brindle boy)! :wub:

Check out our hiking blog! www.greythikes.blogspot.com

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  • 3 weeks later...

Just a little update on the peeing - we haven't had Miles over to our house since I first made this thread, but apparently he has been peeing indoors at home according to our friend if she doesn't restrict his water. I can't help but be concerned about this being a medical issue even though he's had urine tests done already. Should a healthy dog need to have water restricted? Or has anyone had difficulty with potty training up to 9 months after adoption?

Loving life with my first greyhound Max (4 year old dark brindle boy)! :wub:

Check out our hiking blog! www.greythikes.blogspot.com

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There is something called psychogenic polydypsia where a dog drinks and needs to urinate excessively for behavioral reasons, but it's a diagnosis of elimination, meaning you rule out all of the potential medical causes first. Depending on the tests they've already done, I'd say they should likely pursue pursue further testing.

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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I'm not sure if this was already suggested or not, but make sure the grey sees a vet who is very familiar with greyhounds. We have one that I know of in our area and it is worth every cent to drive to see him. I like answers and they can rule out a medical cause vs. behavioral. My 2-year-old peed a few times when we first got him upon visiting a new house that had dogs. I think he was just marking. Hasn't happened again though. This seems like an extensively long time to be doing that. Good luck to your friend!

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Guest makalataylor

Molly only gets a full water bowl from 5 am until 9:30 pm. I pick it up at night. We've taken her to the vet and she checked out fine. She just isn't used to a large amount of water because she was only given water 4 times a day(usually during potty time outside) at the adoption kennel, and the track (except after races).

 

After talking to my vet, who works alongside Auburn University, it is definitely okay to restrict a dog's access to water for a short period of time. You could let him potty, and then pick up water while you're visiting

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Molly only gets a full water bowl from 5 am until 9:30 pm. I pick it up at night. We've taken her to the vet and she checked out fine. She just isn't used to a large amount of water because she was only given water 4 times a day(usually during potty time outside) at the adoption kennel, and the track (except after races).

 

After talking to my vet, who works alongside Auburn University, it is definitely okay to restrict a dog's access to water for a short period of time. You could let him potty, and then pick up water while you're visiting

It's not okay to restrict a dog's access to water if you don't know if the dog has a medical condition. Doing so with a dog that has, for instance, kidney failure could make the dog much sicker. Hence the recommendations that the owner get the dog checked out thoroughly by a vet.

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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Guest makalataylor

I understand that, I thought I had read that the dog had been seen by the vet.

 

In a healthy dog however, limiting water may work in this case.

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Yes, Miles has been to the vet and gotten checked out for at least basic tests (UTI, diabetes). Not sure if they did tests for a kidney infection or not, but his owner doesn't want to pursue further testing at this point for something like Cushings because her dog is so young. Since this is the case, I'm hoping it's behavioral and that there is something we can do to help besides restricting water, as that doesn't seem to be helping the underlying issue.

Loving life with my first greyhound Max (4 year old dark brindle boy)! :wub:

Check out our hiking blog! www.greythikes.blogspot.com

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I'm not sure if this was already suggested or not, but make sure the grey sees a vet who is very familiar with greyhounds. We have one that I know of in our area and it is worth every cent to drive to see him. I like answers and they can rule out a medical cause vs. behavioral. My 2-year-old peed a few times when we first got him upon visiting a new house that had dogs. I think he was just marking. Hasn't happened again though. This seems like an extensively long time to be doing that. Good luck to your friend!

 

I will suggest this to her - thank you! Does anyone know of a good Greyhound vet in the North Seattle area?

Edited by inaandmax

Loving life with my first greyhound Max (4 year old dark brindle boy)! :wub:

Check out our hiking blog! www.greythikes.blogspot.com

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I'm "late to the party" as usual but ... there was a question earlier regarding having difficulty potty training 9 months after adoption ...

 

One of my experiences: I had off and on issues with one of my girls for about her first 2 years. First, she didn't give any obvious (to me initially) signal when she needed to go out - so it was up to ME to watch her very closely 100% of the time so I could learn her signal and get her outside and get her to associate me saying 'outside' with what she needed to do .... She was one who would get up an pace/move around, so, if you weren't 'in tune' with her, you could easily miss/overlook this signal. So, Miles owner needs to be super observant, even at home, to be sure she's not just missing something... since you said he is having accidents at home. If necessary, she needs to keep him leashed at home so she can catch him before the accident happens.

 

This same girl, for me, also took a while to understand that she needed to 'hold it' until I got her signal - though there comes a time that no one can hold it any longer if the dog is being ignored. She would get up and pace/move around, I would miss this signal, then she would just 'go'. So, it took me first being more observant and never, NEVER letting her out of my sight when I was home so I could see this signal and get her out before an accident happened, then it took her understanding that she needed to hold it and let me know 'again' that she needed something.

 

Eventually, she would still initially just get up and move around, if I didn't happen to notice that, she would come over and intently stare at me. Then, when I would ask if she needed to go out, she would bounce, get excited and wag her tail. But this took close to 2 years for us to fully understand each other.

 

Ruling out medical issues is very important, because if it is a medical issue, it needs to be resolved. But being super observant and going back to house training 101 might be helpful since she's not wanting to go further medically at this time.

Lee: (RR's Busy): Oswald Cobblepot X Lively Layla (10/14/97 - 01/22/10) ; Cool: (P's Cool Runner): P's Raising Cain X My Cool Runner (3/3/97 - 12/26/09) ; Nutty: (Itsanutterbutter): State of the Art X Itsalmostsaintly ; Waterproof: (KB's Waterproof): Oshkosh Slammer X Special Lady* ; Sadie: my sweet silly girl: 5/5/98 - 11/26/05
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I'm "late to the party" as usual but ... there was a question earlier regarding having difficulty potty training 9 months after adoption ...

 

One of my experiences: I had off and on issues with one of my girls for about her first 2 years. First, she didn't give any obvious (to me initially) signal when she needed to go out - so it was up to ME to watch her very closely 100% of the time so I could learn her signal and get her outside and get her to associate me saying 'outside' with what she needed to do .... She was one who would get up an pace/move around, so, if you weren't 'in tune' with her, you could easily miss/overlook this signal. So, Miles owner needs to be super observant, even at home, to be sure she's not just missing something... since you said he is having accidents at home. If necessary, she needs to keep him leashed at home so she can catch him before the accident happens.

 

This same girl, for me, also took a while to understand that she needed to 'hold it' until I got her signal - though there comes a time that no one can hold it any longer if the dog is being ignored. She would get up and pace/move around, I would miss this signal, then she would just 'go'. So, it took me first being more observant and never, NEVER letting her out of my sight when I was home so I could see this signal and get her out before an accident happened, then it took her understanding that she needed to hold it and let me know 'again' that she needed something.

 

Eventually, she would still initially just get up and move around, if I didn't happen to notice that, she would come over and intently stare at me. Then, when I would ask if she needed to go out, she would bounce, get excited and wag her tail. But this took close to 2 years for us to fully understand each other.

 

Ruling out medical issues is very important, because if it is a medical issue, it needs to be resolved. But being super observant and going back to house training 101 might be helpful since she's not wanting to go further medically at this time.

 

This is the type of response I've been hoping for this whole time, thank you! Your girl sounds very similar to Miles - subtle signs and not understanding needing to "hold it".

 

This is kind of a silly request, but when you say "house training 101", could you outline that step by step? I just want to make sure we aren't missing anything that could help Miles and his owner out. (The pressure is kind of on as our friend keeps asking if she can bring Miles over and doesn't want to visit us without him, aaahhhh!)

Loving life with my first greyhound Max (4 year old dark brindle boy)! :wub:

Check out our hiking blog! www.greythikes.blogspot.com

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Well, for me, housebreaking 101:

 

If/when I will be leaving them - they go out immediately before I leave. Might need to go out with him/them to witness them actually 'going'.

When I come home, they go out immediately and directly.

 

While I did still slip up on occasion with my girl, it became more and more rare that I screwed up on my side .. Basically, all the rest of the time, I either have the dog leashed to me so they can't 'sneak' off or behind a chair or couch .. or I don't let myself get so distracted as to not notice if the dog gets up/moves around.

 

When the dog gets up when leashed or being observant, ask if they need to go out (or whatever word/phrase you choose to use), then take them out. Then, any and every time they potty outside, treat/reward/praise them for doing the 'right' thing - even at the above leaving or coming home times.

 

A big part of it is being observant enough to set the dog up for success and rewarding that.

 

If/when she brings Miles to your house, just don't let him off his leash in the house, period --- and/or bellyband him. I knew my girl was also absolutely a marker. So, when I had her at someone else's house, I kept her on leash unless I had panties on her. THough, even with the panties, I would watch closely to try to head off any marking. If we were staying with someone, she would have to wear the panties for possibly several days before I felt she had settled in enough to go without.

 

Here is one, sort of humorous, story about my marker girl. It did take, I think, visiting 2 houses for me to 'know' my girl. Well, I took my 2 girls, at the time, to another friend's house. It was my/our first time to visit her house, so first, I had failed to have panties on hand for my girl, so she was going to have to stay on leash. She was showing me around the house, and indeed, it was a bit cumbersome to have my one girl on leash with 3 or 4 other dogs loose, trying to go through doorways. She kept telling me to let her off the leash. I kept refusing. Eventually, I gave in .. which I KNEW better! I bet it was within moments of me releasing her, she went right over to her nice 'oriental' rug promptly marked it. I looked at my friend said that is why I didn't want to let her loose! I listened to myself better from then on!

 

But again, it's mostly being observant and setting them up for success.

Lee: (RR's Busy): Oswald Cobblepot X Lively Layla (10/14/97 - 01/22/10) ; Cool: (P's Cool Runner): P's Raising Cain X My Cool Runner (3/3/97 - 12/26/09) ; Nutty: (Itsanutterbutter): State of the Art X Itsalmostsaintly ; Waterproof: (KB's Waterproof): Oshkosh Slammer X Special Lady* ; Sadie: my sweet silly girl: 5/5/98 - 11/26/05
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Here is one, sort of humorous, story about my marker girl. It did take, I think, visiting 2 houses for me to 'know' my girl. Well, I took my 2 girls, at the time, to another friend's house. It was my/our first time to visit her house, so first, I had failed to have panties on hand for my girl, so she was going to have to stay on leash. She was showing me around the house, and indeed, it was a bit cumbersome to have my one girl on leash with 3 or 4 other dogs loose, trying to go through doorways. She kept telling me to let her off the leash. I kept refusing. Eventually, I gave in .. which I KNEW better! I bet it was within moments of me releasing her, she went right over to her nice 'oriental' rug promptly marked it. I looked at my friend said that is why I didn't want to let her loose! I listened to myself better from then on!

 

 

 

OMG! Haha that is too funny. I hope she was not too upset about the rug!

 

Thank you so much for the advice. I feel like I have a bit of a plan now if a Miles visit is unavoidable in the future. :nod

 

PS - Lee and my boy Max would have been half-brothers! He is an Oswald Cobblepot pup as well.

 

 

Loving life with my first greyhound Max (4 year old dark brindle boy)! :wub:

Check out our hiking blog! www.greythikes.blogspot.com

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Just a little update - Miles' owner is still having trouble with him peeing indoors, so I gave her the tip you all suggested of keeping him on a leash when she is home with him to help him learn a routine and so she can learn his warning signs better. Hopefully this will help.

 

Unfortunately, she says he is home alone for much of the day and she doesn't want to crate him because 1. she thinks it's cruel to leave him in his crate all the time, and 2. he's peed in his crate many times.

 

The good thing is that she contacted her adoption agency after he peed indoors again yesterday while she was home, but in another room. She says he had gone out maybe an hour before this happened and had not had access to water since (she heavily restricts his water, which I am not really on board with, but Miles isn't my dog, so I don't really have much of a say) before he peed inside. I'm hoping they will recommend either a vet better-versed in greyhounds, or a behavioral specialist, so they can get to the root of this issue.

 

Thanks again to everyone for your suggestions. I will update when we get more news, in case it does turn out to be a rare medical issue or a behavioral one that might help somebody else down the road.

Loving life with my first greyhound Max (4 year old dark brindle boy)! :wub:

Check out our hiking blog! www.greythikes.blogspot.com

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When he went out the hour before, is she sure he actually urinated? A full pee, rather than marking? People sometimes make the mistake of assuming their dogs emptied out while turned out, which may not always be the case and would explain why he then went indoors.

 

If she is positive he did a full pee outside, then she really needs to revisit a medical issue. It's really bumming me out that she's restricting access to water in a dog that's having so many accidents despite it though we obviously don't have anywhere near the full amount of information. When he has accidents inside, is he marking or full on peeing? Is it only when they're away or sometimes when they're home? Does he have other signs of anxiety when they leave - won't eat treats left with him, whining, barking, pacing, agitated, destroying things, defecating, etc. There are so many things that could be going on, but without the help of a trainer and/or further investigation into medical issues she's probably not going to get anywhere.

 

Do you think there's any chance they are thinking of rehoming him and that's part of her reluctance to spend more money? From a trainer perspective, a lot of people are willing to deal with a lot of behavioral issues, but the accidents in the house are somehow often a dealbreaker. :dunno

Edited by NeylasMom

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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I'm not positive if she went out with him or not, but I know Miles isn't a marker from experience (we have been on many walks together with our two hounds). He just has one big pee and is done until the next one, whereas Max has a bladder of steel but marks (outdoors, not indoors, thank goodness!) like crazy. So Miles' indoor accidents are full pees as well. It happens often when she is home with him. I don't think he suffers from separation anxiety or that that is a trigger for his urination - he's peed right in front of me, my boyfriend, our greyhound, and our friend, and I hear about more instances of him peeing while she's home than of her coming home to a mess.

 

I don't think she's considering rehoming him. She is still paying off vet bills from his accident earlier this year when he got hit by a car (resulting in many surgeries and eventually having to amputate his leg). I think that's why she doesn't want to accrue more vet bills, which I understand, but it's obvious to me that there is a real problem with Miles. I hope to have better news on this subject soon.

Loving life with my first greyhound Max (4 year old dark brindle boy)! :wub:

Check out our hiking blog! www.greythikes.blogspot.com

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