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Rookie Mistake With New Hound And Cat


Guest aceyouknow
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Guest aceyouknow

Hello Everyone!

 

I've really enjoyed reading through these forums in anticipation of getting my hound, Sammy (formerly Cry Haymitch new name TBD?). He was just dropped off today and I'm worried I may have made a crucial mistake already. Grab a cup of tea because I do feel some backstory is necessary. Thanks in advance for your time :)

 

Before we got him he was living in a home with young kids and cats, all of which he got along with just fine. His owners started neglecting him when they had a baby and realized he was stressed by the crying. They decided to lock him in a laundry room where he proceeded to chew through a waterline and flood their house (serves them right...). They then put him up for adoption on a local SPCA website and kept him outside in that time. Someone from the Grey rescue found him and took him away and put him in a foster home, where he was for about a week before we got him. At his foster he lived with two Yorkies that apparently terrified and bossed him around. I was assured by both my adoption coordinator and by his foster mom that he was cat/small furry friendly and the most mellow dog ever. This sounded like my ideal dog since we have a cat.

 

We've had Macaroni Cat since January. He's a foster turned sponsor cat from the humane society I volunteer with. We ended up keeping him since he had multiple health problems from living outdoors and he's on the older side and would have been much harder to adopt out, also he's super cute with a great personality. We had a pretty serious health scare last month which resulted in him spending the weekend at the e-vet. Vet's orders were to keep him as calm as possible. Before anyone jumps to call into question my motives of getting a dog anyway, be aware that I've gotten the opinion of multiple vets about the possibility of him having a happy and healthy while living with a dog life. When we bought this house the intention was always to get a dog. I've been planning for this moment for nearly 30 years. I've worked at training facilities, studied scientific papers, considered breed types and I feel I have a stronger than average knowledge of dog behavior for someone that has never actually owned a dog. I installed Feliway a week ago after his last vet visit and have been dropping not so subtle hints to him that he would not be an only child for long. We actually dogsat a known cat friendly Frenchie for a weekend and Mac handled it much better than i could have hoped, by giving clear step away signals which the dog respected.

 

When the coordinator brought Sammy to the door today Mac was sitting downstairs in the chair beside me. I asked if i needed to take him upstairs or if Sammy needed to be muzzled and he assured me it would be ok. So against my best judgement I let him in and stood anxiously beside the chair to act as interference. Sammy totally ignored both of us due to his lack of socialization and initial fear of strangers. Coordinator advised that he was like that with everyone upon meeting and was fine after a few hours (it's been a few hours and he has definitely warmed up). He brushed passed the chair multiple times and Mac would hiss but stayed put and Sammy would shuffle away. Went outside for a potty, and coordinator advised to take the leash off (again against my better judgement) as when we came back in, Mac was in the same place and Sammy continued to pace avoiding the cat at each hiss. He was here for almost 10 minutes pacing the bottom floor of the house and Mac finally growled at him walking by so I decided he'd done ok and to take him upstairs. I wasn't really paying attention to where the dog was when I went to pick the cat up since he's be avoiding me, but when I did Mac hissed and this seemed to finally get his attention. Sammy reached up to.. engage?? It's hard to say what the real intention was as I immediately turned away when I saw him reaching. I only felt him brush against my arm. The coordinator called him and he immediately backed off but when I went to take Mac upstairs and put up the baby gate he followed me and tried to poke his nose through the stair rail. I put my body between him and the stairs and walked him back into the living room. The entire time the coordinator was going through the adoption packet he continued to pace with lazer focus on the stairs and trying to put his head through the railing and walking up to the baby gate. The coordinator did not seemed super concerned with the whole interaction. He said it would just take time for them to get used to each other, but his sudden intense focus on the cat his my anxiety on level 10.

 

I totally take responsibility for not going with my gut and using the muzzle, keeping him leashed and for picking up Mac when I started to panic. I've witnessed this very situation in dog parks and knew exactly what not to do, but in the moment I reacted on instinct out of fear for Mac. For the better part of an hour after the coordinator left he continued to pace and show interest by putting his head over the gate and sniff the stairs and the chair Mac was in. He's a big guy and probably could move the baby gate without much effort. He eventually calmed enough to hop up on the sofa with me, eat and play with a toy for a bit. I crated and muzzled Sammy before leaving to run an errand and checked on kitty upstairs. He heard Sammy whimpering and moving in the crate (I was told he has some SA) and went back under the bed. I'm worried I've ruined both of these animals. Sammy, by awakening latent prey drive and Mac by stressing him out beyond his limits. I've read through the forums here and have posts on cat desensitization bookmarked. I was feeling pretty confident about my ability to handle the introduction, but I'm really kicking myself. Sammy is dozing on the sofa looking super cute right now. I'm committed to both of these animals. Any recommendations on how to handle the situation? I'm just paranoid about there being irreparable damage, right?...

 

Much appreciated if you made it through the novel!

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Welcome to GreyTalk! Congratulations on your adoption of Sammy! So happy he's found a good home where he can be well-treated as your beloved family member.

 

Perhaps reconsider the idea of encouraging (or elevating, so to speak) Sammy up on humans' furniture so soon. Better for him to learn to use pet beds on the floor. It can take several months or longer for a dog to begin to reveal his true personality in a new home. It's too soon to see if he has (or will develop) protective resting space issues. Also, better to keep him off furniture to eliminate unnecessary territorial issues between the cat and dog trying to share humans' furniture.

 

Try not to worry too much about what happened today. It's a common reaction when an unfamiliar small animal is picked-up (moves unexpectedly, or runs), but you're very smart to reevaluate and implement introductory dog and cat safety measures. I absolutely agree to keep your hound muzzled when not crated. During this brief introductory period, briefly leashing your hound to your body (never tethered to an object) whenever the cat is roaming freely inside the house will help protect the cat, dog, and enable you to ensure house training gets off to a good start. Otherwise, crate the dog when the cat is not behind a fully closed/latched door. Even though Sammy lived with small animals, he's much more stressed being placed in another new environment. It will take time to settle in and for the cat and dog to adjust to each other. Be aware that muzzled Greyhounds can harm a cat with their muzzle or by pouncing on the cat with their long legs, even during play. Best to discourage any chasing of cats. You probably know that it's considered "game on" if a Greyhound is allowed outside in a fenced yard with any cat (whether it's your family cat, a neighbor's cat or stray, etc.). It's very likely (from what you've written) that Sammy will be able to learn fairly quickly that Mac is also a valued indoor family member.

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Your hound, Sammy may excel a bit faster in his training since he's lived with cats before, but the important safety precautions below will help you too. :)

 

GreyTalk member, Greyt_dog_lover (Chad) was kind enough to write the following guidelines for new Greyhound adopters who live with cats.

Quoted from GT post April 9, 2015:

 

"First week:

1) Muzzle does not come off the hound unless the cats are behind closed door, or hound is in crate, PERIOD.

2) Cats will be put behind closed doors for more than half of the day the hound is awake and I am home.

3) When the cats are around, the hound will have a leash attached (as well as muzzle, see above).

4) to work on desensitization, get some good small bites of food, such as cheese. Have significant other/friend help with the next few steps

5) One person has hound with muzzle and leash on one side of room, second person gets cat and walks into room holding cat. Person with cat sits on floor on opposite side of room and allows the hound to see the cat. Person holding hound calls his/her name, once the hound looks, give treat. REPEAT for 5-10 minutes. DO NOT allow cat to move or otherwise stir and make noise. If the cat gets upset, remove the cat, do not allow the cat to run or make noise as this may excite the hound.

6) do this multiple times during the day. After each session, the cat should be placed in a room, do not allow interaction.

Second week:

1) Muzzle does not come off the hound unless the cats are behind closed door, or hound is in crate, PERIOD.

2) Again, two people. One brings cat into room, one holds the hound with muzzle and leash. Person with cat should sit much closer to hound. The hound can be allowed to approach the cat and sniff. All the while the person holding the hound should call his/her name and treat when the hound looks away from the cat. If the hound does not look away from the cat, the person holding the hound on the leash should move away from the cat and get the hounds attention, if needed show the treat to the hound to break the hounds' attention.

3) REPEAT for 5-10 minutes multiple times during the day.

4) After each session the cat should be placed in a room, do not allow interaction.

Third week:

1) Muzzle does not come off the hound unless the cats are behind closed door, or hound is in crate, PERIOD (see the trend?).

2) Again, two people. The hound still has muzzle and leash. By this time the hound should be nearly 100% reliable in looking away from the cat for a treat. If not, repeat second week until you have 100% reliability.

3) Second person brings cat into room, sets the cat down and allows the cat to move around the room. The person with the hound should be ready for the hound to try to move, do NOT allow the hound to follow or approach the cat when it is moving around. Instead call the hounds name and treat. If during this week the cat takes off or the hound starts to get anxious (barking, panting, drooling, excessive pulling) you need to go back a week.

4) If you can now distract the hound while the cat is moving around the room, good. Keep this training up for a week.

Fourth week:

1) Muzzle does not come off the hound unless the cats are behind closed door, or hound is in crate, PERIOD.

2) Two people, same drill (muzzle and leash).

3) Now you want to get the cat riled up when you have the cat and hound in the room together. If the cat is calm, then push the cat to run out of the room or otherwise get the kitty to make noise. Hold the leash and repeat treating when the hound looks at you. If you cannot get the hounds attention, go back a few weeks in the training.

4) Repeat daily.

Once you can have the cat in the room running around and making noise and be able to get the hound to look at you for treats, THEN you can allow the cat to have free run of the house. At this time, put up the baby gates at strategic places around the home (such as hallways and maybe doorways) about 6" above the ground. This will allow for the cats to move freely, but the hound cannot follow. Also as others have said, pull away the furniture from the walls to allow the cats to slide behind. At this time I may allow the cats and dogs to be able to move around at night, but have to see both how calm the cats are around the hound and vise versa. Before this I do not allow the cats and dogs to be able to be in the same room at night when I sleep, period.

This method of desensitization is much more effective at getting hounds and cats to live together as it reinforces the behavior you want, as opposed to correcting the behavior you don't want. For correction to work, you have to be present.

Do not allow your cats and dogs to co-mingle while you are gone for at least the first 3-6 months, you never know what can happen when you are gone. The muzzle does not guarantee that your cat will not be harmed. A greyhound can still kill small animals with a muzzle on.

The thing you need to realize is that if you cannot break the stare of the hound, if the hound constantly hunts the cats in weeks 2 and 3 after the cat leaves the room, if your hound will not eat a treat when a cat is near, all these things add up to - NO cats for this hound. Good luck and be sure to keep your little one's safe at all times (as you already are doing).

Chad"

End Quote.

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When we're doing cat tests/intros with two people, the hounds are leashed and muzzled. The cat is harnessed, leashed and controlled by another person. The cat walks normally on the floor. Cat workable, muzzled hounds are permitted to sniff the cat's rear end (as a normal animal-to-animal introduction).

Edited by 3greytjoys
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Guest aceyouknow

Thanks so much for the advice!

 

After I typed the original post I tried the method you posted with them being in the same room this was about 6 hours after the original interaction. Cyrus (formerly Sammy as of last night :hehe ) didn't seem to have much interested in being involved in the process. He was being held on leash by my partner whom he'd met a few hours after me and barely wanted to stay in the room so that might have outweighed any interest in the cat. Mac didn't seem too stressed by the dog as later that evening he came down to the baby gate and started meowing and looking for cuddles. Cyrus lifted his head when he heard the meow but immediately went back to sleep. All hope is not lost?? Cyrus did not have a good night of sleep though as his separation anxiety seems to be a lot worse than I was anticipating. But I guess one hurdle at a time?

 

I do think it's interesting what you mentioned about not encouraging him to sit on our furniture yet. We actually got him about a week earlier than we were planning after his foster mom had an emergency hospitalization so all of his stuff, including the bed we bought is in transit. He showed very little interest in his crate (seems to actively hate it tbh) so that makes it a little harder. As I type this he's actually in the chair Mac was sitting in. I'll go ahead and shuffle him off...

 

Do you recommend allowing the cat to have free reign of the house when we take Cyrus out of the house? He's not one to stand in front of the door when we come in but he's usually in the living room waiting for us.

 

Thanks again!

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FWIW I do not buy into dogs having a sense of entitlement if allowed on human furniture...that is a matter of human preference.

I've received flack over the years for not making my dogs wait behind me until I've walked through the door. Around here it is sort of a mutual respect for each other. I'm a firm believer in that if you take the time to listen to your dogs (and cats) they'll teach you. Heck, I've been declared crazy by a federal judge so don't put too much into what I say but my dogs have taught me a LOT over the years by listening to them vs. asserting power over them. My first grey was the biggest spook ever and the second greyhound I've ever seen outside of the clubhouse at a track. I met Bets on Chig the greeter at the greyhound hall of fame about 30 minutes before they brought me Little Girl. Her owner had died and she was basically tossed food for a year. She and I taught each other a lot. She taught me about greyhounds and I taught her about being a pet.

Sounds like you're doing just fine. On hurdle at a time is a great thought.


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From my reading of your first post, it sounded like a typical interaction of a somewhat stressed hound in a new situation. I think they will adjust to each other just fine. I would definitely watch them closely for the first few months, and keep them separated when you are not home at first. How long is "at first"? That will depend on Cyrus and Mac and how you see them interacting.

 

Honestly, my introductions between cat and dogs have not been as cautious and elaborate as what Chad recommends, but my cats have a room that they can get to that the dogs can't get into.

 

My dogs get on the furniture if they want to, I've never had any problem getting them to mind me and get off if I need them to. I don't crate my dogs, but if Cyrus has SA, you may need to at first. Or, if he really hates the crate, that could make it worse :) Helpful, huh? Again, you'll just have to watch him and see how he reacts.

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Guest aceyouknow

I really appreciate the reassurance with the introductions. Mac has been mostly hanging out under the bed, which isn't too different than his normal behavior, but I do notice him clutching tighter when I pick him up. I guess it's all a matter of time. We do need to working on making the crate a happy place in the time being.

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You've already gotten good advice regarding the cat. You mentioned a rough night because of SA. Are you trying to have him sleep separate from you? Dogs are social creatures. I believe very strongly that they should be able to sleep with their humans at night, not isolated for 6-8 hours or longer, especially a dog with separation anxiety issues. If you are worried about cat interactions use a crate or an x-pen around his dog bed in your bedroom. I think you will find he may settle quite well in a crate overnight in the room with you and that may help him start to feel more comfortable in it.

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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Mac didn't seem too stressed by the dog as later that evening he came down to the baby gate and started meowing and looking for cuddles. Cyrus lifted his head when he heard the meow but immediately went back to sleep. All hope is not lost??

 

Do you recommend allowing the cat to have free reign of the house when we take Cyrus out of the house? He's not one to stand in front of the door when we come in but he's usually in the living room waiting for us.

 

Great news about Mac resurfacing so soon. Given carefully supervised cat/dog management, I think both of your fur babies will be able to live together very well.

 

It's fine for Mac (cat) to have free reign of the house whenever Cyrus (hound) is away/outside with you; however, entrances/exits are very common times when accidents happen. It will help to keep a muzzle at the door to ensure Cyrus can be muzzled before entering since Mac's quiet presence or movement might surprise him. Also, keep Cyrus leashed while entering the house (which is important for Greyhounds anyway if coming back inside from an unfenced area).

 

FWIW I do not buy into dogs having a sense of entitlement if allowed on human furniture...that is a matter of human preference.

 

Just to clarify: My comment regarding waiting before (or if ever) allowing dogs up on human furniture is based on general canine positive training practices. Many adopters (any breed) suddenly realized their dogs had or developed resting space issues, resource guarding, sleep startle, etc. intensified by sharing humans' furniture. While not all dogs have space issues, being proactive becomes more important when small, fragile animals like cats (and/or children or adult visitors) are sharing humans' furniture. IME, it's beneficial for new dogs to be set-up for success in the early months vs. required retraining after an incident.

 

Separately, for dogs with separation anxiety, it's important to help them build self-confidence by the dog resting undisturbed on his/her own pet bed (vs. e.g., physically touching their owner for excessive time periods while sharing their humans' sofa or bed). Of course, it's human's choice; just wanted to provide some reasons behind the adage: "Let resting dogs lie undisturbed" (on their own pet beds). :)

 

OP: If needed to coax a dog off of furniture, helps to call the dog into another room for treats or fun activity, or toss treats on the floor within dog's sight to entice him off furniture freely. (Please do not lean over/grab/pull the dog's collar since that can be considered a threatening action in dog language.)

 

Often helps to feed meals (and treats) in the open door crate to help form positive, happy associations with the crate. Later, closing crate door only while dog is eating meals, eventually leaving crate door closed a few minutes after meal is finished - then taking him outside to potty. Thereafter, gradually leaving door closed a little longer while you are still in sight for brief blocks of time, etc...

 

Good luck, and have fun with Cyrus. We'd enjoy seeing pictures; he seems like a great dog! :)

Edited by 3greytjoys
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Guest aceyouknow

You've already gotten good advice regarding the cat. You mentioned a rough night because of SA. Are you trying to have him sleep separate from you? Dogs are social creatures. I believe very strongly that they should be able to sleep with their humans at night, not isolated for 6-8 hours or longer, especially a dog with separation anxiety issues. If you are worried about cat interactions use a crate or an x-pen around his dog bed in your bedroom. I think you will find he may settle quite well in a crate overnight in the room with you and that may help him start to feel more comfortable in it.

 

So I'm not actually opposed to him sleeping with us I'd like him to, but up until now that has been Mac has slept on or under our bed. The vets all advised that we initially keep a "safe space" for the cat. This happens to be our bedroom. It always has been. It's interesting with Mac the way he reacts. I sat at the top of the stairs on one side of the baby gate grooming him and my boyfriend came to the bottom of the stairs to talk and Cyrus came up beside him. Mac saw Cyrus and immediately hissed but continued rubbing against me in the open and asking for me to continue grooming. He did not seem distressed. Cyrus watched us but made no attempt to come up the stairs and walked away with my boyfriend when he called him. Mac and I went into the bedroom where we sat on the bed cuddling, until we heard Cyrus. I could hear his nails on the floor below and Mac jumped off the bed and ran under it. I'm guessing because he can see the barrier and where the dog is he feels more comfortable standing his ground so to speak. I have no problem with Cyrus being upstairs but I want Mac to continue feeling safe. He's a pretty skittish cat in general and is still adjusting to indoor life in a lot of ways. So I can only imagine the dog scratching around in a crate in his bedroom could really set him back in terms of trust. Does that make sense?

 

Anyway, I "slept" downstairs with Cyrus last night, which didn't seem to do much even with the radio on. He's not bonded with us at all but he does seem distressed when we're both upstairs, he actually knocked over the baby gate this morning at the bottom of the stairs (Mac was in the bedroom) but responded pretty well to a leave it command. He eventually calms down enough alone to find a cozy spot on the sofa though... I don't know if it would be causing more stress with one animal to make the other more comfortable.

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Consider getting Feliway diffusers and plugging them in throughout the house, especially the bedroom. Hexk, might as well get DAP for Cyrus too. DAP comes in a collar option - might help him settle. Then you can do the Feliway diffusers for the cat.

gallery_12662_3351_862.jpg

Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

"The great thing about science is that you're free to disagree with it, but you'll be wrong."

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Guest aceyouknow

 

Great news about Mac resurfacing so soon. Given carefully supervised cat/dog management, I think both of your fur babies will be able to live together very well.

 

It's fine for Mac (cat) to have free reign of the house whenever Cyrus (hound) is away/outside with you; however, entrances/exits are very common times when accidents happen. It will help to keep a muzzle at the door to ensure Cyrus can be muzzled before entering since Mac's quiet presence or movement might surprise him. Also, keep Cyrus leashed while entering the house (which is important for Greyhounds anyway if coming back inside from an unfenced area).

 

 

Just to clarify: My comment regarding waiting before (or if ever) allowing dogs up on human furniture is based on general canine positive training practices. Many adopters (any breed) suddenly realized their dogs had or developed resting space issues, resource guarding, sleep startle, etc. intensified by sharing humans' furniture. While not all dogs have space issues, being proactive becomes more important when small, fragile animals like cats (and/or children or adult visitors) are sharing humans' furniture. IME, it's beneficial for new dogs to be set-up for success in the early months vs. required retraining after an incident.

 

Separately, for dogs with separation anxiety, it's important to help them build self-confidence by the dog resting undisturbed on his/her own pet bed (vs. e.g., physically touching their owner for excessive time periods while sharing their humans' sofa or bed). Of course, it's human's choice; just wanted to provide some reasons behind the adage: "Let resting dogs lie undisturbed" (on their own pet beds). :)

 

OP: If needed to coax a dog off of furniture, helps to call the dog into another room for treats or fun activity, or toss treats on the floor within dog's sight to entice him off furniture freely. (Please do not lean over/grab/pull the dog's collar since that can be considered a threatening action in dog language.)

 

Often helps to feed meals (and treats) in the open door crate to help form positive, happy associations with the crate. Later, closing crate door only while dog is eating meals, eventually leaving crate door closed a few minutes after meal is finished - then taking him outside to potty. Thereafter, gradually leaving door closed a little longer while you are still in sight for brief blocks of time, etc...

 

Good luck, and have fun with Cyrus. We'd enjoy seeing pictures; he seems like a great dog! :)

 

He seems to have pretty good manners about getting off when I give a strong off command. He's a very passive dog in general. This morning we went on a sighthound walk. Was it such a good idea to throw him into the wolves so to speak? I don't know, but he behaved so well. Everyone was surprised that we'd only just gotten him with how well he behaved on leash. He seems to be a very passive dog in general.

We're going to try what you mentioned about feeding in the crate while we're around. Does it matter that his food is not elevated? Or should it be something along the lines of treats? He's pretty reluctant in general to follow treats into it.

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Both your fur babies are beautiful! I wouldn't worry about taking him to the walk, most greyhounds love being around other greys :)

 

Cyrus is probably subdued because he has been through a lot of changes recently and is still figuring things out. He will probably start to come out of his shell over the next few weeks and months.

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Guest aceyouknow

Consider getting Feliway diffusers and plugging them in throughout the house, especially the bedroom. Hexk, might as well get DAP for Cyrus too. DAP comes in a collar option - might help him settle. Then you can do the Feliway diffusers for the cat.

 

I bought Feliway and plugged it in a week ago. Not sure if it's making a difference really. I'll look into DAP for Cyrus. I've been dropping the Bach's Remedy in all the food and water. Can't really say if that's helping either. I need to be taking these for myself with how stressed out I am. Need all the essences!!

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They are both handsome fur babies! :)

 

This morning we went on a sighthound walk. Was it such a good idea to throw him into the wolves so to speak?

 

We're going to try what you mentioned about feeding in the crate while we're around. Does it matter that his food is not elevated? Or should it be something along the lines of treats? He's pretty reluctant in general to follow treats into it.

 

Agree that the walk was probably fun for him to be around other sighthounds. As mentioned above, they love being around their own kind after spending early years on Greyhound farms and in racing kennels. Cyrus really seems like an instapet. (Racers straight off the track take extra adjustment time learning about pet life, homes, TVs, mirrors, etc.)

BTW, if his previous longer-term family named him Sammy, consider calling him "Sammy-Cyrus" for a week before dropping Sammy. It will help him feel less bewildered during his transition.

 

If you want him to begin trusting/bonding with you first (before starting meal feedings in crate), you can try quietly sitting on the floor holding his dog food cupped in your hands (or holding his dog bowl) low enough for him to eat comfortably from your hands during his first few meals. If you hand feed, look away from him (no direct eye contact) and do not pet him during those feedings so he can feel more secure while eating. Afterward, praise him with a goood boy.

 

If you have an empty house plant basket (or similar), a dog bowl can be dropped into the rim to gain several inches of height without taking up extra space in the crate during meal times. (Remove basket when dog is not eating and not supervised.)

He may be more reluctant to follow treats into the crate if he's been locked inside previously for extended periods without enough potty outings. If he were ever placed in the crate for punishment, it will take more effort to counter-condition that type of negative association. If the crate happens to have two doors, leave both doors open during meals, and while tossing treats around the outside of the crate, then gradually toss treats inside the crate as a fun, happy "find it" game (without him feeling too nervous that he will be locked inside and left alone). The crate should have a thick, comfortable dog bed. Many Greyhounds are sensitive to hard surfaces (breed's lack of body fat).

 

Good luck. :)

 

 

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For what it's worth, I disagree on the name change. Call him whatever you want. Start now and in three days he won't give a rat's necktie what he used to be called.

 

I have two cats and a greyhound. Sounds to me like things are going to work out fine based on the progress you've made so far. Just have a safe space the cat can run to that the dog can't get--they actually make a baby gate that has a tiny door at the bottom that you can open for a cat to go in and out of. The gate itself has hinges so you can swing it open while it remains mounted in the door frame. I'd suggest putting something similar in the doorway of whatever room houses your litter box. It's important the cat never be disturbed by the dog whilst using the box. The last thing you want is the cat deciding elsewhere is more private.

 

What a handsome boy he is! And the cat too.


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Susan,  Hamish,  Mister Bigglesworth and Nikita Stanislav. Missing Ming, George, and Buck

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Guest aceyouknow

We went with Cyrus because I wanted something with a similar "S" sound. He only seemed to answer to Sammy about 50% of the time so we went ahead and attempted the switch. We actually called Mac "Kitty" for a good 2 months since we thought his foster name was pretty silly and now he answers to both :) My friend told me about a game they played with their puppy to get them to learn the name so we're going to try that.

We tried the greeting again, hound on leash and muzzled, cat on my lap. When Mac hisses Cyrus turns to hide between my boyfriend's legs and peek out. He doesn't make any attempt to engage with the cat. He's also getting less and less interested in the stairs. I don't think he's going to be a problem. What worries me that Mac is becoming more and more stressed, especially by the noises the dog makes in the crate at night. Last night we gave him a yummy kong and after some coaxing he spent a good hour in the crate and eventually fell asleep. When we went to go to bed he woke up and his calm only last about an hour before he starting stressing. I stayed downstairs with him for about 4 hours before the bf came and sent me to bed. Around 7 he started really stressing and he's been out since then. We'll start his feeding in the crate tonight and see how that goes.

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Guest aceyouknow

For what it's worth, I disagree on the name change. Call him whatever you want. Start now and in three days he won't give a rat's necktie what he used to be called.

 

I have two cats and a greyhound. Sounds to me like things are going to work out fine based on the progress you've made so far. Just have a safe space the cat can run to that the dog can't get--they actually make a baby gate that has a tiny door at the bottom that you can open for a cat to go in and out of. The gate itself has hinges so you can swing it open while it remains mounted in the door frame. I'd suggest putting something similar in the doorway of whatever room houses your litter box. It's important the cat never be disturbed by the dog whilst using the box. The last thing you want is the cat deciding elsewhere is more private.

 

What a handsome boy he is! And the cat too.

 

 

This is what has me really worried about bringing the dog into the bedroom. I'd be removing that safe space. Because of the way our house is designed we don't really have a way to introduce Cyrus to the upstairs without invading kitty's space.

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i have found that cats will rule the dog, no matter the dog's size... I tend to believe a boy that has lived outdoors knows how to defend himself if he needs to... but i don't think it'll come to that... dogs know instinctively to fear the little monsters...

 

i also think Cyrus should be allowed to sleep with his people at nite... how else will he bond and learn you are his pack/family? I think the noises he makes in the crate, downstairs, when he's all alone, will disappear if he's allowed on the floor in your bedroom, and Mac will be fine in bed with you guys, if that's where he sleeps... he can also hide under the bed, where Cyrus can't reach him... and the room can remain his safe space the rest of the time... he'll just have to share it at nite... i really do think Mac will be fine, and i think Cyrus will respect his older brother and give him his space, as soon as he hears that hiss...

 

Call him what you want, but always call him by that name, in a happy voice and with good things associated with it, and he will respond to it in no time...

 

Most importantly, relax and enjoy your boys... spend time with them, talk to them, and they will begin to relax too.. Cyrus is still shell-shocked.... it will take some time for his personality to come out... i think he will fit in beautifully... Mac may always keep his distance since he was an outdoor kitty... but he may surprise you and warm up to Cyrus too... it is much too soon to know.... just enjoy your time with them... they are both beautiful, and you are a wonderful mom to have taken them in...

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When we first got Brandy both of my cats were terrified, and I wasn't sure how Brandy would react to them either. I set up a safe room for them as well, and periodically through the day I would muzzle and leash Brandy and walk her into the room. We would just stand by the door, let the cats and dog get an eyeful of each other, and exit. I made sure to keep the times random that we would appear. At first, the cats would fluff themselves up, hiss, make crazy eyes, and dart. Slowly, they started to just freeze and fluff up, until it got to the point that while they would go very, very still and not let their eyes leave Brandy, they lost their super intense fight-or-flight reaction. Throughout it all I would ask for Brandy's attention, and praise when she looked away from the cats. She never really had an interest in them though. Within a week I was confident that she wouldn't try to catch a cat, and let them have free reign of the house. The cats rarely left the room, but when they did venture out I would keep a close eye on Brandy, and praise her when she lost interest and would put her head back down. Any time she tried to get up to investigate I told her no. Pretty quickly she learned that the cats were off limits.

 

Perhaps you could try something similar as far as letting Cyrus 'intrude' occasionally so to speak, into Mac's space? Neither of them are going to particularly like it, but eventually they have to get used to each other. Your cat will be stressed, but it will click that bad things don't happen when the dog is around. My cats went from being ultra stressed, hiding, and shedding like crazy, and now they will walk up and sniff Brandy's paws (as long as she doesn't move a muscle) and will swat at her back playfully when she walks by where either of them are perched. If Cyrus is calm, then I would allow Mac to warm up at his own pace. Maybe you could also try letting Cyrus sleep in your room, muzzled?

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