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Life With A Podenco Versus Greyhound

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For the last year or so I have had my eye on a newish podenco rescue. They were in California when I first discovered them, but have now moved to Oregon, about two hours away from me. I have been thinking about getting involved with this rescue for a while, but since Irene died, I have been positively obsessed. I definitely want to help the founder get established in her new region and help with outreach and fundraising in Oregon. What I can't decide is if a podenco is right for my household.

 

Greytalk, what do you say? How would you compare life with a greyhound to life with a podenco? I am concerned mostly with energy level.

 

I live in the city, and have a smallish yard with a very high fence. I cannot think of a fenced dog park with a high enough fence, but maybe there is one. Although I never would have run her in an unenclosed area, Irene was not a flight risk in dog parks. She only cared about visiting the other dog owners and eating crab grass.

 

What other differences are big enough to warrant consideration? I would take another greyhound in a heartbeat, but I am also taken with the plight (and the giant ears) of the podencos.

 

Apologies if this is in the wrong category.


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I don't live with a podenco, but I have a lot of experience with them and I live with two galgos. They are more active than greyhounds, more curious and are very silly. They can also jump VERY high! They'd don't usually have the space issues that greyhounds often have and they are used to sleeping in piles, so they are great snugglers.

 

Re: fence; when I adopted my galgos I had a 4.5" fence and thought it was fine. I couldn't understand why some groups required a 6' fence. Then I saw one of my galgos jump 6' into a tree to go after a squirrel, and replaced my fence with a six footer that weekend. Even now, I don't like to leave them unsupervised because I'm sure they'd could jump the 6' fence with motivation. My understanding is that pods are even better jumpers than galgos.

 

My galgos do better in dog parks than my greyhounds did because galgos (and pods) have been exposed to all kinds of dogs. They play more like normal dogs, and I understand it's the same with pods.

 

Personally I wouldn't hesitate to adopt one, despite their higher energy level.

 

I'm going to send the link to this thread to GreyhoundPoet, as she has both and could give you more information than I can.

 

GreyHoundPoet can't receive messages. Can anybody contact her?

Edited by robinw

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Xavi the galgo and Allen the cat. Missing Iker the galgo ?-Feb.9/19, Treasure (USS Treasure) April 12/01-May 6/13, Phoenix (Hallo Top Son) Dec.14/99-June 4/11 and Loca (Reko Swahili) Oct.9/95 - June 1/09.

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No personal experience, but what Robin said above seems to be the case. Pods and galgos seem to be much more athletic, and more inclined to ignore barriers than greyhounds. Most pod/glago rescues require a full 6 foot fence around the yard for adoption approval.

 

What's the name of the group?? I haven't heard of another sighthound adoption agency coming to Oregon recently. It would be nice to have someone closer.


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It's called Hound Sanctuary. They are in Warrenton, OR, near Astoria.

 

We have a 6 foot fence, but I have the same feeling, that they should not be unsupervised. My feeling was also that they do not seem as fragile as our noble greyhounds, skin not as thin. What about diseases? Like we have to be aware of tick-borne diseases with greyhounds, I assume these dogs are coming in with parasites as well. Any other interesting health-related differences?

 

I like the sound of a cuddler. Irene had pretty bad sleep aggression. We had to love her according to her rules, bless her soul.


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My galgos were all tested for diseases before they came to Canada, including Heartworm. They big concern is leishmaniasis, which can show up later. I know some people who have had to deal with it, but I haven't.

 

My guys have been very healthy and hearty.

 

One thing, many of these dogs were street dogs, so they might have some strange habits. They can also be real escape artists. I use heavy duty non escape harnesses for my galgos, and would do the same if I had a pod.

 

Anyway, they crack me up. You see pictures of them standing on all kinds of furniture, like counters and table tops.


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Xavi the galgo and Allen the cat. Missing Iker the galgo ?-Feb.9/19, Treasure (USS Treasure) April 12/01-May 6/13, Phoenix (Hallo Top Son) Dec.14/99-June 4/11 and Loca (Reko Swahili) Oct.9/95 - June 1/09.

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OMG... "the CDC recommends euthanasia of infected dogs due to their concerns of spreading the disease and its zoonotic nature." I get it, but, ouch!

 

So, when they say it sometimes doesn't show up for years, does that mean it can't be detected or they don't show symptoms?


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It's called Hound Sanctuary. They are in Warrenton, OR, near Astoria.

 

We have a 6 foot fence, but I have the same feeling, that they should not be unsupervised. My feeling was also that they do not seem as fragile as our noble greyhounds, skin not as thin. What about diseases? Like we have to be aware of tick-borne diseases with greyhounds, I assume these dogs are coming in with parasites as well. Any other interesting health-related differences?

 

I like the sound of a cuddler. Irene had pretty bad sleep aggression. We had to love her according to her rules, bless her soul.

Would definitely talk to Rain about your concerns and questions, not every pod is the same and some may be more suitable than others.

If you'd like to do some more research on the types, I would suggest checking out this Dutch website, it has a translate button for English and if you scroll down all the way, into the green part you will see a list with almost all types and descriptions. http://www.podencoworld.nl

 

In general, pods are a healthy breed, in Europe they are listed as 'half' sighthounds, not sighthounds.

They are sturdy, intelligent, agile and totally fun dogs. If you enjoy doing things with your dogs, a podenco would suit you, classes, adventures, never a dull moment with a pod.

 

As for health, they should not come to the US riddled with parasites, a good Spanish organization deworms, defleas and certainly no ticks.

There should be blood tests for heart worm, Leishmania, Ehrlichia and most test for Anaplasma also.

 

 

 

OMG... "the CDC recommends euthanasia of infected dogs due to their concerns of spreading the disease and its zoonotic nature." I get it, but, ouch!

 

So, when they say it sometimes doesn't show up for years, does that mean it can't be detected or they don't show symptoms?

That is such nonsense, Leishmania is transmitted through a certain type of sandfly, which is extremely rare in the US.

But, the disease can be dormant for up to 7 years.

If a dog is tested positive, it still doesn't mean the disease is active, but stress or another disease can bring it out.

This is why it is wise to know the symptoms and have a dog imported from countries with Leish. tested once a year.

To be honest, I have as much change on carrying it without knowing as my dogs have, since I have been in Spain several times during the season this sandfly is active.

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I got to talk with a lady named Terrianne at a greyhound event last year who is a big podenco fan. She's the lucky lady who adopted Lucas from Galgos del Sol, anybody remember his adorableness? He's doing GREAT. Anyway, she had two poddies at the time I met her, and she's since adopted another one. She knows her dogs. She runs her poddies through agility tournaments and takes them running with her a lot. She was telling me that they're fantastic dogs but you absolutely HAVE to know what you're getting into, and be prepared to supply them with enough exercise that they don't go crazy. Think border collies with adorable pointy faces. They need a LOT of both mental and physical exercise.


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I have been in touch with Rain, and I am planning to go out to meet her and the dogs in the next month or so, but I am trying not to drive her crazy with too many questions until then. Even if we ultimately decide that podencos are not for us, I still want to help.

 

Thanks for the info and the perspective and the Dutch website!


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I know there will be a podenco in my future, but still have my hands full with Sami, Lehto and Brisa, all galgos that act like 2 year olds.
But I enjoy doing agility with my dogs and hope to be able to do it with a pod in the future also :)

They really are great dogs, but definitely not greyhounds.

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Oh, we're not planning to bring another dog in until the end of the summer, so plenty of time in any case, and we'll probably foster to begin with, either way. Although, I can well imagine that after a visit with the dogs our timeline might accelerate.


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I love podencos. I met and became very smitten with a lot of them in Spain. They are so silly, affectionate, busy and smart. I've thought about adopting one, but it wouldn't be practical. I don't think I could keep up with their energy. At my age, I prefer a lower activity level. But if you are active and love spending time with your dog, a podenco would be so much fun. Maybe doing agility if you don't have a big yard?

 

I think a young, healthy, happy pod could do this all day! :offwall

 


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I love podencos. I met and became very smitten with a lot of them in Spain. They are so silly, affectionate, busy and smart. I've thought about adopting one, but it wouldn't be practical. I don't think I could keep up with their energy. At my age, I prefer a lower activity level. But if you are active and love spending time with your dog, a podenco would be so much fun. Maybe doing agility if you don't have a big yard?

 

I think a young, healthy, happy pod could do this all day! :offwall

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M43DDPboigA

OMG, it's Xavi in a pod suit!

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Xavi the galgo and Allen the cat. Missing Iker the galgo ?-Feb.9/19, Treasure (USS Treasure) April 12/01-May 6/13, Phoenix (Hallo Top Son) Dec.14/99-June 4/11 and Loca (Reko Swahili) Oct.9/95 - June 1/09.

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That video! :omg Crazy! One thing I learned from it: Our Galgo pup Jules (almost 1) is crazy, but NOT as crazy as that! Something to be thankful for :colgate


Tin and Michael, Greyhound: Ambi, plus Lucas, Baltasar, Picasso, Hero, Oasis, Galina, Neizan and Enzo the Galgos.
Remembering houndie Bridge Angels Tosca, Jamey, Master, Jules, Marco and Diego.

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Disclaimer: I can only speak for Podenco Ibicenco (Ibizan Hounds) as they are the only Podenco breed that I have owned. In addition to living with some, I am in the breed club and active in the breed community. I’ve spent a ton of time with a lot of Beezers and their people. The description I give you is of a typical Podenco Ibicenco and does not include variations of individuals or anything specific to being rescues. My only Spanish rescue has been my Galgo. My Podencos are American-bred.

 

Podencos coming from Spain may be pure or mixed, as you know. The Podenco breeds are all regional and their differences stem from specific breeding for various purposes and terrain. Contrary to popular belief, they are not all Ibizan Hounds or even just one breed. ;) They are a family. However, much like any family of dogs, there are similarities. I would recommend researching which Podenco breed would best fit and working with the group to find one that fits your needs. Just like any dog, differences happen and not all fit the "mold".

 

Ibizans are super affectionate (lots of love and kisses), snuggly, goofy, comical, intelligent, energetic, engaging, active (mind and body), mischievous dogs. They live to entertain and to hunt. My husband and I are so incredibly smitten that we will always have some. However, they are not for everyone and most of my Greyhound-owning friends say that they like to visit and play but would not want to live with them. :rofl They are known as "Peter Pan dogs" because they are forever puppies. :wub:

 

They need extensive physical exercise. Some are low-key, however, just like there are high energy Greyhounds, they are not the norm. This is not a breed family to get into if you are not very active yourself because it is unfair to a high-energy dog to get them and force them to be a couch potato. Plus, they want to do stuff with you! Mine love to go on adventures with me. Exercise needs will vary by dog but most folks end up with walks/hikes of 5-10+ miles, biking with them, structured running (not just putting them in a yard), agility, etc. Basically, tire those bodies and know it takes a lot more work than Greyhounds. They are specifically bred for a hunting style that incorporates both high and long continuous jumping and endurance, so I certainly would not be comfortable with anything less than a 6’ fence and I wish I could go higher. Mine jump up and grab birds out of the air and they are higher than my 6’ fence when they do it.

 

In addition to active bodies, they have very active brains. I find them to be both intelligent and biddable (for a hound). They are major problem-solvers. They still have their independence but, at least all of the ones I know and my own, love their people and want to make them happy…most of the time. ;) You know, when there isn’t anything more exciting going on and it doesn’t inconvenience them too terribly much. ;) Because they are intelligent problem-solvers they need their brains engaged a lot. A Podenco that is not getting enough brain challenge will find ways to keep themselves active. This can include opening crates from the inside and getting on top of the fridge and opening cupboards, etc. Finn’s sister, at 8-weeks-old, literally pushed a chair across a floor to place it next to a counter and use it as a stepping stool to get on said counter and try to grab butter. One of mine opens kid gates that adults can’t get through without asking how. :P I joke that they would make fantastic evil geniuses if it wasn’t for the “Yay” factor.

 

That’s right…Yay. As soon as I brought home my first I coined the term “life is YAY”. Basically, they are happy, happy, happy, dogs and make it difficult to be in a bad mood around them (well, if you have patience and a sense of humor anyways). You can come home and find that they ate part of the wall (not typical, just an example) but they are so darn happy to see you that you can’t be mad between the dancing, leaping, flailing, and kissing. They also make great alert dogs. ;) They can be noisy when they spot something exciting and when they play. That is my only complaint about them, actually. ;) Podencos play differently than typical Greyhounds (rougher) but, fortunately, they are much hardier. Their skin is not as thin and they don't have a lot of the feet/toe issues that Greyhounds tend to have. They typically are good with all types of dogs but I will say that a common sentiment in the community is that they have special relationships with their own breed. Mine are super snuggly and spend a lot of time bathing our faces in kisses. They actually spend a good deal of time hunting in the yard. My Greyhounds will course something if they see it. My Ibizans go looking for the thing that they want to course. ;)

 

I will say that I absolutely love them and think they are nearly perfect dogs. However, I can certainly see how a lot of people don't want to deal with them. :lol:

 

Check out Ella (not mine, bred by a friend): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vB4uBSOrQ0I

 

 

 

I think a young, healthy, happy pod could do this all day! :offwall

 

 

Yup! After a 10 mile hike and several runs. :lol:

Edited by GreytHoundPoet

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GreyHoundPoet can't receive messages. Can anybody contact her?

 

I have no idea why I can't receive messages, but thanks for messaging me on FB.

I like the sound of a cuddler. Irene had pretty bad sleep aggression. We had to love her according to her rules, bless her soul.

 

One of mine literally sleeps on top of my chest and stomach. They also snuggle around me or snuggle each other. :wub:

 

Anyway, they crack me up. You see pictures of them standing on all kinds of furniture, like counters and table tops.

 

They certainly like high places. :lol: I have to constantly clean my half wall because somebody keeps standing on top of it and then napping there. :P

Edited by GreytHoundPoet

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Thanks, GreyhoundPoet! After all this information, and frankly, it's just confirming what I expected, I will probably foster and just see if I can make a podenco happy in my home. My greyhound was super easy for the most part. Not into mischief, not even particularly clever for a greyhound. I think the only thing she ever stole and ate was a post-it note, and that was mostly out of frustration. You could pretty much trap her in a room by putting an extension cord across the exit. Irene loved to walk more than the average greyhound, but she could also live without it. I'll have to see if I can actually handle a dog dog, instead of a cat dog. I'm willing to try it out and see.

 

Would you say they have the same issues with recall that greyhounds have? Like you wouldn't trust them off leash?


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The only time mine are off leash in an unfenced area is at lure coursing trials. I retrieve them at the end of the course. Quite frankly, I would not trust them otherwise. I have friends who have successful off-leash Ibizans but I would never attempt it personally because I worry too much, I don't have a safe place or the background in training off-leash hunting dogs, and I don't have the technology (fancy GPS collars and the like) needed for me to feel comfortable. I'm a worrier and protective. I do train recall but if they go off hunting I fear that it won't be enough with my dogs. I don't think any rescue would allow it either.

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I am also a worrier, and a rule follower, so if someone tells me not to do it, there is no way I would risk my dog's safety. I just wanted to verify what the thinking was. Don't know where I will end up. Gonna take it all in, meet some dogs, see how it feels and go from there. Thanks so much for the perspective. I really appreciate it.


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GreyhoundPoet, what about sociability? You mentioned they are cuddly with you,but are they particularly social, even with strangers? As in, will seek out attention relatively immediately, or is it more on their own terms or when there's nothing better to do?

 

A puppy is SO far off in my future but it will happen some day and in the meantime I like to think about breeds. ;)

Edited by NeylasMom

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Jen, CPDT-KA with Zuri, lab in a greyhound suit, Violet, formerly known as Faith, Skye, the permanent puppy, Cisco, resident cat, and my baby girl Neyla, forever in my heart

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I've also seen them climb 6' fences to visit their friends; not jump but climb. Then again, I've seen galgos do the same.


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Xavi the galgo and Allen the cat. Missing Iker the galgo ?-Feb.9/19, Treasure (USS Treasure) April 12/01-May 6/13, Phoenix (Hallo Top Son) Dec.14/99-June 4/11 and Loca (Reko Swahili) Oct.9/95 - June 1/09.

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