Jump to content

Hi All


Greymike
 Share

Recommended Posts

That's it. You are now an officially greyhound addict.

 

Hello from Germany.

Sorry for butchering the english language. I try to keep the mistakes to a minimum.

 

Nadine with Paddy (Zippy Mullane), Saoirse (Lizzie Be Nice), Abu (Cillowen Abu) and bridge angels Colin (Dessies Hero) and Andy (Riot Officer).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you all for the warm welcome. I'm in New Jersey, USA. I'm hoping to adopt 2 females. I've heard that male dogs and female dogs get along better but I just can't deal with the leg lifting thing. I plan to take them on walks frequently and train the dogs well, but I also understand that accidents happen. When an accident does happen, I'd prefer it to be on the floor and not halfway up a wall.

 

 

I live in an apartment where large dog aren't allowed. I'm in the process of buying a home so when I get settled in, I'll be able to adopt.

 

I think the previous occupants were animal lovers because the home has a smell of urine. It's going to take some work to get the smell out completely and I plan to put in a wood floor. I'm a little worried that wood floors aren't great with dogs. I can also choose tile but tile is so cold and hard. No one likes that, probably not greyhounds.

 

Im adopting 2 because I want to minimize and chance of anxiety. I live alone so it wouldn't be fair to leave a dog home alone while I'm at work. I previously had a Yorkie and it broke my heart to leave the apartment because she'd get upset.

 

 

Anyway, time for bed. Thanks again for the warm welcome.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you all for the warm welcome. I'm in New Jersey, USA. I'm hoping to adopt 2 females. I've heard that male dogs and female dogs get along better but I just can't deal with the leg lifting thing. I plan to take them on walks frequently and train the dogs well, but I also understand that accidents happen. When an accident does happen, I'd prefer it to be on the floor and not halfway up a wall.

 

 

I live in an apartment where large dog aren't allowed. I'm in the process of buying a home so when I get settled in, I'll be able to adopt.

 

I think the previous occupants were animal lovers because the home has a smell of urine. It's going to take some work to get the smell out completely and I plan to put in a wood floor. I'm a little worried that wood floors aren't great with dogs. I can also choose tile but tile is so cold and hard. No one likes that, probably not greyhounds.

 

Im adopting 2 because I want to minimize and chance of anxiety. I live alone so it wouldn't be fair to leave a dog home alone while I'm at work. I previously had a Yorkie and it broke my heart to leave the apartment because she'd get upset.

 

 

Anyway, time for bed. Thanks again for the warm welcome.

I wouldn't think you'd have much problem with the boys lifting their legs once the initial adjustment period is over, and they make belly bands for that. That being said, there is nothing wrong with getting two girls. I think it's more about personality than sex, especially when they're fixed. We have tile and Jake doesn't have a problem unless he's going really fast. I would be prepared to temporarily use rugs if they're uncomfortable at first. We have one guy only and both work all day, and I no longer feel much guilt because if we come home early you can tell we woke him up :) Again though, your plan sounds good too.

jakesigsmall_zps254e191c.jpg

Photographer in Phoenix, AZ www.northmountainphoto.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi from Texas :) Once you put in the wood floor, you could use runners to help with traction or area rugs if they have problems on the floor.

 

Since I adopt mostly seniors, slippery flooring is always a concern for me. The younger ones don't have as much trouble as a general rule (some don't like it at all).

 

When you go to get chosen, see who chooses you -- don't worry about gender. I've had tons of males since greyhounds (only 3 males the 30 years before) and I've only had one or two lift their legs in the house and they learned quick. Most of the males would bust a gut before going in the house.

 

Looking forward to see who you come home with!

Diane & The Senior Gang

Burpdog Biscuits

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Rubbles_Mom

I was hellbent on a girl because I wanted one on the smaller side...

I have a 72 pound boy 😆. It's definitely about which dog chooses you. I wouldn't trade him for the world!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

 

Thanks for the advice everyone.

 

 

 

I've warmed up to the idea of getting a male. I'll probably go with the wood floor and just put down a bunch of carpets.

 

I've been reading through the behavior section and I'm getting super worried about separation anxiety. It's seems like a super common problem.

 

One of the reasons I chose the greyhound breed is because they're supposed to be so relaxed. Apparently, that's not the case.

 

There's a few rescues in NJ, and a big one way down South. I think it's a five hour drive. I was browsing their website and they had a few that were describes as "wonderful for therapy dog". I'm guessing that means that those particular dogs are really relaxed and not prone to anxiety, but I could be totally wrong. I think it's a good idea to take the long trip in the hopes they will have more dogs to choose from. It seems like they have lots more dogs than the closer rescues. I really don't want to adopt a dog and have to return it because of anxiety.

 

I'm prone to anxiety myself and couldn't handle a dog who had anxiety issues.

 

Beyond reading the description on the rescues web page, can anyone give advice on how to not choose a dog prone to anxiety? Of course I'll take the rescues recommendations into consideration, but I think I need to educate myself a little more.

 

 

Thanks all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Rubbles_Mom

On the issue of the floor, I have wall-to-wall hardwood downstairs and much prefer it to carpet...much easier cleanup! He had no issue with the wood floors at all. I did have to buy some $25 stair treads from amazon for the wood stairs but I was warned I'd probably need those.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest DarkHorse

We have almost all hardwood and Dexter does fine on it, despite being a senior. It's just a matter of being patient. Also, nice old style hardwood tends to be easier for them to handle. The one place we put down carpet was on the stairs, and he would use them before, but we didn't want to chance him slipping. We put a carpet runner down both sets for a couple hundred dollars, and I think it was worht it.

 

I'd recommend going to a group that does in-home fostering if you're concerned about separation anxiety. They won't catch all cases, but they're usually pretty good about noticing dogs that might have issues. A group with a very involved volunteer base is good too, as they will tend to be the sort that are more understanding of and helpful with any issues you do have. I would prioritize both of those attributes over the size of the group or the number of dogs they have. A good group will be able to find your match out of the dogs they have or wait until they get one that will work. Other groups may just encourage you to take one you like without assessing if it's a good fit. If they're asking loads of questions and encouraging you to come to events, that's usually a good sign.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We haven't had to deal with separation anxiety, but I will say that reading the "Training and Behavior" and "Health and Medical" threads can make diseases and behavior issues seem more common because people are specifically going there for help. I haven't posted about SA because my boy stays home alone all day and is 100% okay with it (if we come home early he is still sleeping). My adoption coordinator seemed to think he would be good alone because he was only fostered with one other dog, not a whole pack. Also it should be better if you get two.

jakesigsmall_zps254e191c.jpg

Photographer in Phoenix, AZ www.northmountainphoto.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your best bet for a dog without anxiety issues is, as someone else mentioned, to adopt a dog that has been fostered in a home. It's still not fool-proof, but you'll have a MUCH better idea than just pulling a dog from the kennel.

 

BTW, I've had 3 male greyhounds and none has ever lifted a leg in my house :)


Meredith with Heyokha (HUS Me Teddy) and Crow (Mike Milbury). Missing Turbo (Sendahl Boss), Pancho, JoJo, and "Fat Stacks" Juana, the psycho kitty. Canku wakan kin manipi.

"Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." - Voltaire

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have had three greyhounds and never had an issue with anxiety but I have always had at least two dogs in my home, at one time three. Many greyhounds can do well as a single dog but I think they really do prefer the company of another dog.

I have anxiety too and my hounds help me so much. Hard to feel bad when loving on your hound!

Welcome to the cult, I mean club. Visit Greytalk often for much needed advice and support. Everyone has been wonderful to me in the years I have had hounds.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your best bet for a dog without anxiety issues is, as someone else mentioned, to adopt a dog that has been fostered in a home. It's still not fool-proof, but you'll have a MUCH better idea than just pulling a dog from the kennel.

 

BTW, I've had 3 male greyhounds and none has ever lifted a leg in my house :)

This. And to add, the majority of my male dogs have been squatters not leg lifters :lol

 

Welcome ! Be sure to post pics when you get your new friends!

Old Dogs are the Best Dogs. :heartThank you, campers. Current enrollees:  Punkin. Annie Oooh M. 

Angels: Pal :heart. Segugio. Sorella (TPGIT). LadyBug. Zeke-aroni. MiMi Sizzle Pants. Gracie. Seamie :heart:brokenheart. (Foster)Sweet. Andy. PaddyALVIN!Mayhem. Bosco. Bruno. Dottie B. Trevor Double-Heart. Bea. Cletus, KLTO. Aiden.

:paw Upon reflection, our lives are often referenced in parts defined by the all-too-short lives of our dogs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone. I'll look into getting dogs that have been previously fostered. That should help in a few different ways.

 

Just last night I was wondering about teaching the dogs stairs. If I were to get 2 that were new to staircases, it would make for an interested few days, getting them both up and down safely.

 

So much to think about.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...